Dine Dash 24hour food race kicks off tomorrow

first_imgDine & Dash: 24-hour food race kicks off tomorrow << Previous PostNext Post >> Share Tuesday, June 20, 2017 Posted bycenter_img TORONTO — 24 hours, 2 men, 1 airline and 150 years. This is the gist of an epic coast-to-coast race set to launch tomorrow in Charlottetown.Dubbed a ‘great Canadian food race’, the event teams up Ritz-Carlton, Toronto Executive Chef Daniel Craig with Culinary Adventure Co. owner Kevin Durkee on a 24-hour cross-country journey celebrating Canada’s 150th anniversary.The edible adventure will begin on June 21 at the home of Confederation in Charlottetown before jetting off via Air Canada to Halifax, Ottawa, Toronto and Calgary. The race ends in Vancouver at midnight on June 22.Sounds impossible? Maybe. But one thing’s for sure: there’ll be lots of eats, and plenty of Canadiana to make Canadians proud.The pair of racers will source ingredients to be used in a Taste of Canada menu at the hotel’s signature restaurant, TOCA, starting July 1.“Whether it’s Nova Scotia blueberries or sustainable fish farmed off the coast of B.C., our aim is to sample food from as many cities as we can within one day,” said Chef Craig. “We’re excited to share our adventure with guests when we return to Toronto and create a truly Canadian menu in honour of Canada’s 150th.”More news:  Can you guess the one and only hotel company to rank on Indeed’s Top Workplaces in Canada list?The coast-to-coast tour is part of the hotel’s new culinary program, ‘Off the Eaten Track’, a customized series of culinary tours curated exclusively for guests of The Ritz-Carlton, Toronto by Culinary Adventure Co.You can watch the team live @facebook/ritzcarltontoronto or on Instagram @culinaryadvco, or visit ritzcarlton.com/en/hotels/canada/toronto/area-activities/off-the-eaten-track for more information. Tags: Ritz Carlton Travelweek Group last_img read more

Software glitch causes check in delays at airports worldwide

first_imgTags: Airports, Amadeus MADRID — Authorities say passengers at airports around the world have suffered some delays because of a problem with check-in systems.The Spain-based company Amadeus, which provides software to airports, airlines and the tourism industry, confirmed Thursday that a network issue caused disruption to some of its systems and services.It said its technical teams identified the cause of the problem and services were gradually being restored.It would not say how many airlines or airports were affected.London’s Heathrow airport said a small number of airlines were experiencing intermittent issues with their check-in systems at airports around the world. It said there might be delays but that passengers would be able to check in. Share Software glitch causes check in delays at airports worldwide Source: The Associated Press Thursday, September 28, 2017 << Previous PostNext Post >>last_img read more

Paolo Soleri graduated from the Politechnico in T

first_img Paolo Soleri graduated from the Politechnico in Torino with highest honors and a Ph.D. in architecture in February 1946. He received a grant given to outstanding students; at that time, just after the war, the grant amounted to about ‘6 lb. of butter’. Soleri wrote F.L. Wright expressing his desire to study at Taliesin and was accepted. As it was the custom with students who could not afford Wright’s already high student fees, Soleri was initially assigned to work on the the kitchen and then to be personal aid at the dining table for the Wright family. Soleri became an apprentice to Wright, working primarily in the kitchen as a waiter and dishwasher, and also as a gardener and construction worker at both Taliesin East (Wisconsin) and Taliesin West (Arizona). Soleri also became a personal waiter to Mr. and Mrs. Wright. Soleri was still learning English while at Taliesin. He built a very simple shelter on Taliesin grounds, as other Wright’s apprentices do, as living quarters. Paolo studied with F.L. Wright for 18 months. March 24, 2005 The board of directors of the Taliesin Fellows held its annual meeting for Taliesin Fellowship, FLlW Staff and former apprentices of the FLlWSA at David Dodge,a long-time fellow at Taliesin, designed and built this house on his property adjacent to Taliesin West. [Photo:tt & text: sa] last_img read more

Amazon Prime Instant Video is to launch in Japan

first_imgAmazon Prime Instant Video is to launch in Japan, putting it in direct competition with soon-to-launch streaming rival Netflix.The Amazon Prime delivery service is already in operation in the territory, but to this point it has not distributed its SVOD service there.The video service will launch next month, with Netflix set to roll out on September 2.“As we’ve shown with the launch of Prime Video in the US and around the world, we are investing significantly to bring high-quality, local and popular programming to Prime members, and our customers in Japan should expect the same investment,” said Amazon Japan president Jasper Cheung.“We’ve been offering videos and DVDs in Japan for 15 years — we know the entertainment customers want — and we plan to deliver it with Prime Video, all at no additional cost.”Industry sources have been pointing a Japanese launch for some time, though the announcement is the first concrete evidence.Amazon will likely create local content for Japanese customers, with anime and local drama mooted.The e-commerce giant currently streams programming such as Transparent for Prime customers in the US, the UK and Germany.“We are passionate about making distinct, exclusive entertainment that will become Prime member’s next favorite TV show or movie, and we know Prime members in Japan will love what we introduce just for them,” said Amazon Studios VP Roy Price.Prime currently costs ¥3,900 (US$32.50) per year, which means it will be markedly lower-priced than Netflix, which will be ¥650 per month. Other players in the SVOD market include broadcaster Nippon TV, which acquired the Hulu Japan assets in 2014.last_img read more

CAOIMHE MCKNIGHTCONCERN OVER SELLING OF RUNAROUND

first_img CAOIMHE MCKNIGHTCONCERN OVER SELLING OF RUNAROUND CARS – MCKNIGHTSinn Fein SINN Féin Councillor for the Galliagh area Caoimhe McKnight has called for car owners to be more responsible when they are selling on second hand cars.She was speaking after two more cars were burned out in the Galliagh area this weekSpeaking to the Journal Councillor Caoimhe McKnight said:“What happens on many occasions is once those driving about in these run-around cars think they have been spotted by police they get rid of the car as soon as possible with Galliagh unfortunately being the area of choice.“I am calling on anyone who is selling a car to be more vigilant , especially if they are being sold cheaply, in the region of a couple of hundred pounds. “They should check the age of the buyers and question if they believe the car is been genuinely bought to be driven safely and legally or if this person may have ulterior motives for buying it.“The community is plagued by this kind of anti-community behaviour and death driving through the area and residents should not have to put up with it.“It is only a matter of time before someone is seriously injured or killed with these death drivers and there is also concerns about the fire hazard of burning out the cars.“It takes time, money and resources of not only the emergency services and the police but also of the local Council workers to carry out clean ups. “This money could be better spent in helping develop the community for everyone to enjoy,” she added.CONCERN OVER SELLING OF RUNAROUND CARS – MCKNIGHT was last modified: October 27th, 2017 by John2John2 Tags: ShareTweetlast_img read more

2PG Company receives grant to develop sensitive lowcost molecular diagnostic tests for

first_img Source:https://www.twoporeguys.com/ Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Nov 19 2018Two Pore Guys, Inc. (2PG) today announced that the company has received a $2.8 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to develop sensitive, low-cost molecular diagnostic tests for tuberculosis (TB) using its solid-state nanopore technology. The 18-month grant will fund proof-of-concept work to determine if 2PG technology could provide an easy-to-use, sensitive and low-cost point-of-care device that would be compatible with automated, wireless reporting for resource-poor settings.TB is one of the top 10 causes of death worldwide, and the leading cause from a single infectious agent. Millions of people continue to fall sick with TB each year. WHO estimates 10 million people developed TB last year worldwide.Related StoriesECDC-WHO report: TB remains a major public health challenge in the European regionHIV patients diagnosed with tuberculosis more likely to die within 10 years, study findsScientists discover hundreds of protein-pairs through coevolution studyThe WHO 2018 Global TB Report, released in September, calls for an unprecedented mobilization of national and international commitments to meet the global target of ending TB by 2030. Underdiagnosis of TB is a major challenge: only about 6.4 million of the 10 million people who contracted TB in 2017 were officially recorded by national reporting systems, leaving 3.6 million people undiagnosed or detected but not reported. Late detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), the infectious organism that causes TB, increases the risk of transmission, delays treatment, and burdens the healthcare system. Lack of affordable, sensitive and rapid detection of MTB is a major hurdle in low- and middle-income countries. Implementing a low-cost, sensitive and portable molecular diagnostic test is expected to save thousands of dollars per patient.”Our point-of-care technology platform offers tremendous value to address medical testing needs in resource-limited areas,” said William Dunbar, Co-founder and interim CEO of Two Pore Guys. “We are grateful to the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation for this support and for their enthusiasm about the promise of our technology. We hope to make a difference in the lives of millions of people around the world who need better access to affordable TB care.”last_img read more

Asuragen launches assay to help diagnose Steinerts Disease

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Dec 4 2018Asuragen, Inc., a molecular diagnostics company delivering easy-to-use products for complex testing in genetics and oncology, today announced the CE marking and launch of the AmplideX® DM1 Dx Kit, which simplifies the analysis of repeat expansions within the DMPK gene and is intended to aid in the diagnosis of Myotonic Dystrophy Type I (DM1), also known as Steinert’s Disease.DM1 is an inherited form of muscular dystrophy that affects approximately 1 in 8,000 people worldwide. The condition is associated with a repeat expansion of 50 CTG trinucleotides or greater in the DMPK gene, with disease severity positively correlated to the number of repeats. These expansions can extend beyond a thousand repeats, requiring the use of cumbersome Southern blot technology to estimate their size and assess disease prognosis.Related StoriesScientists develop universal FACS-based approach to heterogenous cell sorting, propelling organoid researchNew natural product fractions library to advance drug discovery effortsPipettes of the Future: Automation for Acceleration”We have verified the [AmplideX DM1 Dx Kit] in our diagnostic laboratory and were delighted with the results,” said Nicola Williams, consultant clinical scientist of Queen Elizabeth University Hospital in Glasgow. “This assay is easy to use from test setup to analysis and reporting of results. It was able to detect and resolve every expansion we investigated and provided accurate sizing of large pathogenic repeats.”The AmplideX DM1 Dx Kit provides multiple benefits to laboratories analyzing this challenging target. The assay features a streamlined, PCR-only workflow with the ability to detect and size repeat expansions up to 200 repeats within an eight-hour laboratory shift. For larger expansions up to 1000 repeats, the assay also features an optional agarose gel electrophoresis (AGE) workflow to further estimate their size without the requirement for Southern blot. The kit provides all necessary reagents to accurately size these expansions from as little as 20 ng DNA. Powered by Asuragen’s proprietary AmplideX technology, the assay’s unique, three-primer design also helps to resolve zygosity and detect low-level mosaicism in patient samples. As with the broader AmplideX portfolio of products, the assay is indicated for use on the established suite of Applied Biosystems™ Genetic Analyzers, including the 3130, 3500, and 3730 platforms.”Despite recent technical advances within our industry, the detection and sizing of repeats in DMPK has remained a significant challenge for diagnostic laboratories worldwide,” said Matthew McManus, M.D., Ph.D., president and CEO of Asuragen. “With this launch, we continue to demonstrate that AmplideX technology is a powerful clinical tool with benefits not just for laboratorians, but also the clinicians and patients who depend on their results.”​ Source:https://asuragen.com/last_img read more

Brain synchronization depends on the language of communication

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Feb 15 2019Experts from the Basque research center BCBL have shown for the first time that the way in which the activity of two brains is connected depends on whether the dialogue takes place in the native language or in a foreign language.As two people speak, their brains begin to work simultaneously, synchronizing and establishing a unique bond. This is what in neuroscience is called brain synchronization.New research by the Basque Center on Cognition, Brain and Language (BCBL) in San Sebastián and published in Cortex magazine confirms that this phenomenon depends on the language we use to communicate.The study, carried out with the collaboration of several international institutions such as the University of Toronto (Canada) and the Nebrija University of Madrid, has allowed scientists to analyze how brain wave synchrony occurs in different linguistic contexts.Thus, experts have found for the first time that the way in which the activity of two brains becomes synchronized or similar depends on the language used in the conversation.This work, led by Alejandro Perez of the BCBL, adds to an earlier work done in 2017, which described the phenomenon of brain synchronization in communication between two people who speak in their native language.As in the first experiment, the researchers arranged 60 people into same-gender pairs, each composed of individuals who, separated by a screen, did not know each other and were similar in age and demographic characteristics.Following a script, the pairs engaged in a general conversation alternating their native language with a foreign language. Using electroencephalography (EEG) – a non-invasive test that analyzes the electrical activity of the brain – scientists measured the activity of brain waves simultaneously.”We have seen how the alignment of brain waves occurs differently when the conversation takes place in a native language or in a foreign language. This study has allowed us to move forward and show that brain synchrony depends on the linguistic context,” Pérez explains to SINC.”The brain areas that synchronize best between the two brains are different according to whether a foreign or a native language is being used,” adds the expert. “This new discovery raises many questions and new lines of research in neuroscience.”Synchronizing to understand the interlocutorRelated StoriesWearing a hearing aid may mitigate dementia riskPosterior parietal cortex plays crucial role in making decisions, research showsStudy provides new insight into longitudinal decline in brain network integrity associated with agingSpeaking a foreign language makes our brains align in a different way to understand the interlocutor. “The brains of two people who speak a foreign language establish a different neuronal bond from when they use their native language in order to understand the interlocutor,” assures Pérez.Although the specific reasons for this are not yet clear, those responsible for the study are mainly inclined to think that it is due to the so-called joint attention strategies, an essential phenomenon for coding and processing information in a coordinated manner, which is specific to each language.”When a conversation takes place in one’s native language, both interlocutors pay attention to it in a more global way, focusing on the sentences and the global content of the message,” stresses Jon Andoni Duñabeitia, co-author of the study.However, when done in a foreign language, attention resources focus primarily on other, more complex linguistic levels for non-native speakers, such as sounds and words.”In the latter communicative context we need to reconfigure our attention strategies so that we can understand each other, and this may be directly related to the difference in the areas synchronized during the conversation,” suggests Duñabeitia.Future ImplicationsFor the authors, this work opens up the future possibility of quantifying verbal communication between two people. “Real-time signal processing and cheaper devices that measure brain activity will make it possible to integrate sensors into the actual headphones of computers,” says Alejandro Pérez.”This will offer a quantitative assessment of the quality – personal involvement – and characteristics – language or emotional charge – of verbal interaction through online communication tools such as Skype,” concludes Pérez. Source:https://www.agenciasinc.es/en/News/The-language-of-conversation-impacts-on-the-synchronisation-of-our-brainslast_img read more

Thats cold Japan tech blasts snoozing workers with AC

first_img Air conditioning manufacturer Daikin and electronics giant NEC said Thursday they have begun trialling the system, which monitors the movement of the employee’s eyelids with a camera attached to a computer.The computer can automatically lower the room’s temperature if it detects dozing at desks.”We hope to introduce this system commercially in 2020,” a Daikin spokesman told AFP, adding that a trial had began this month.The system uses Daikin’s technology to automatically adjust temperatures and NEC’s facial recognition technology to monitor different types of eyelid movement that suggest sleepiness.It was developed after an initial study done by the companies on how best to keep people alert.They tried lowering temperatures by a few degrees, increasing brightness and spraying aromas in a room while participants did simple maths for about an hour.”Our study proved that lowering temperature is effective… especially when the early signs of sleepiness are detected,” the companies said in a joint statement.And in news likely to provide cold comfort to Japan’s infamously overworked salarymen, Daikin hopes to eventually develop air conditioners that can direct cool blasts to specific snoozing workers. © 2018 AFP A slightly warmer office won’t make it too hot to think Explore further Citation: That’s cold: Japan tech blasts snoozing workers with AC (2018, July 26) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-07-cold-japan-tech-blasts-snoozing.htmlcenter_img The system monitors the movement of employee’s eyelids with a camera attached to a computer Japanese office workers hoping to nod off on the job may need to sleep with one eye open thanks to a new system that can detect snoozers and blast them with cold air. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

5G presents security challenge for telecom operators

first_img “Nothing will ever be 100 percent secure” Explore further © 2019 AFP “Operators are moving from a hardware system to a virtualised and fully automated one,” said Darren Anstee, technology director at Netscout, which provides software for networks.”Security is about visibility, when you can’t see everything on your network, this is when you have a problem,” he added. Citation: 5G presents security challenge for telecom operators (2019, February 28) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-02-5g-telecom.html But a study by the University of Lorraine in France found that the new wireless network still contains some security holes which were already present in previous networks, 3G and 4G.5G offers “improved data protection when compared to the previous wireless norms” but “flaws persist and the weaknesses that have been identified” could allow “several cyberattacks and have an impact on the protection of privacy,” it said.Experts say the architecture of 5G networks also presents entirely new security challenges.Fifth generation wireless networks use “network virtualisation”, which refers to moving some resources which have traditionally been delivered in physical hardware to a virtual software-based network.It is designed to allow the network to make better use of data transfer rates and provide more flexibility to 5G networks. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Nothing 100% secure5G allows for the available bandwidth to be split up into channels, each of which is independent from others and can be separately secured, which some experts say can help boost security.”We can create a kind of micro-networks, with different levels of security. The idea is to compartmentalise the network according to different uses,” said Laurent Boutet, a systems engineer at US computer networking company F5Network.Mobile communications industry body GSMA, which stages the Mobile World Congress, estimates the number of connected devices will triple to 25 billion by 2025.For Dexter Thillien, an analysts at Fitch Solutions, the main challenge for security is this rise in the “number of entry points, considering the exponential number of objects which will be connected.””From the point of view of security, the network itself is secondary,” he said.”You have to keep in mind that nothing will ever be 100 percent secure. We still don’t have a precise idea of how billions or even trillions of connected objects could affect networks, it is still unknown at this point,” said Thillien. Uses for the lightning-fast 5G network will be virtually limitless and include autonomous cars While Washington’s concerns that future 5G wireless networks could be vulnerable to spying by China have dominated headlines, businesses have long been pushing to make sure the technology is as secure as possible. Huawei takes fight with US over spying fears to top mobile fair With fifth-generation wireless networks, or 5G, starting to be rolled out this year, the issue of 5G security was in focus at the Mobile World Congress trade fair which got under way Monday in Barcelona.Unlike upgrades of wireless networks in the past, 5G will deliver not just faster phone and computer data but also help connect up cars, appliances, cargo and crop equipment.Washington has warned that allowing Chinese firms like Huawei to provide the equipment to build 5G networks could leave them vulnerable to spying on the part of China but this is only one of the risks.5G’s much faster speeds, vast data capacity and lower latency—or response time—are expected to underpin entirely new technologies such as self-driving cars and telemedicine—which in turn may attract cyberintrusions by criminals or terrorists.”There will be more data which will be transferred…it is clear that security is much more complicated,” said Yannick Sadowy, the director for telecoms and media at consulting firm Accenture.Mathieu Lagrange, who is responsible for internet security at com institute, said the risks to 5G’s security “were taken into account” when the norms for the technology were established. 5G may just to be too complex to protect it from all attemps at interferencelast_img read more