SA a nation of givers: survey

first_img19 December 2005South Africa is a nation of givers. A recent survey has revealed that a massive 93% of the country’s people support charities and other social causes, with 54% donating money, 31% giving food or goods, and 17% volunteering time to help the needy. For the first report of the State of Social Giving series, commissioned by the Centre for Civil Society, National Development Agency and SA Grantmakers’ Association, researchers questioned more than3 000 South Africans over the age of 18 in all parts of the country, including informal settlements and rural areas. The project cost of R9-million and took three years to complete.Extrapolating their results to the entire population, the researchers found that South Africans contribute an average of R920-million a month to poverty alleviation and development – a full 2.2% of the monthly income of the working age population.In addition to giving to formal charities, 45% of people donate money and/or goods directly to the poor – street children, people begging on the street and so on.“We found that a massive 93% of respondents gave (time, money or goods, to a cause or individual) in the month before being interviewed,” the researchers say.“We deliberately cast the net as wide as possible: these figures include respondents who made monthly financial contributions to a charity as well as those (for example) who gave a sandwich or cold-drink to a street child begging at a traffic light.”An inclusive culture of givingThe survey found that the culture of giving cuts across race and income levels in South Africa.“Giving seems to be ingrained in respondents,” the researchers say. “Giving is not the domain of the wealthy: it is part of everyday life for all South Africans, rich and poor alike.”A total 77% of those surveyed gave money directly to charities, causes or organisations or to poor people directly, adding up to a total of R100 571 at an average of R44 per respondent who gave money.“We can extrapolate these findings to the population as a whole. South African citizens mobilise almost R930-million in an average month for development and anti-poverty work. From one perspective, this is a massive amount of money. Seen in context, it amounts to 2.2% of the total monthly income for the working age population (as measured by Census 2001).”The causes supported are dominated by those serving children or youth (22%), followed by HIV/Aids (21%) and the poor (20%). These are followed by people with disabilities (8%) and the elderly (5%).South African giving behaviour by race (Source: State of Social Giving report)Giving behaviour is roughly the same across the racial groups. Some 96% of Indians donate money, goods or time, followed by 94% of blacks, 90% of coloureds and 89% of whites.An interesting finding was that Gauteng, South Africa’s wealthiest province, gives less than the Eastern Cape, one of the poorest provinces.Other findings are that men give more money than women, but women give more time. While white South Africans give to organisations more than black South Africans do, blacks give more time.A feature of giving in South Africa is the amount passed to extended families, which is not accounted for in philanthropic studies. Fifty-nine percent of blacks give to their extended families, compared to 58% of Indians, 42% of coloureds and 39% of whites.VolunteeringSeventeen percent of South Africans give their time to serve worthy causes, with women volunteering slightly more than men. African volunteers give the most time, followed by coloured people, Indians and lastly whites.The average amount of time volunteered is constant among young people and adults – between 10 and 11 hours – and only rises among those aged over 60 years of age, to an average of 12 hours.Poor people (23%) are more likely to volunteer than the more wealthy (17%). “Volunteering, in South Africa, is not the preserve of the middle class with time and resources at their disposal, which we also saw was true of other types of giving,” the researchers say.Reasons for givingTwo-thirds (68%) of South Africans give to the needy for feelings of human solidarity: “We should give because the poor have nothing, or are suffering, or are in need, or deserve something from us.”For 10% of the population, it is more of a rational decision to help tackle poverty. Almost one in 10 of those surveyed answered the question in religious terms, with 3% saying they give because their God requires it of them and 6% because by giving they will be blessed.A third (34%) give to people in immediate need, with a fifth saying both short-term need and long-term solutions deserve their support – in other words, that both charity and development have a support base to draw on.South Africans are highly motivated to give to local causes, but less so to global issues – only 8% have ever given money specifically to international causes.Download the full text of the State of Social Giving report in PDF format here. Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Hanli Prinsloo: ‘Fall in love with the ocean, to save it’

first_imgSouth African Hanli Prinsloo travels the world to capture images of life in the sea. She gives public talks about falling in love with the ocean, a necessary step to protect it. She also heads I Am Water, an organisation that teaches children about ocean conservation. Besides running projects to teach children about ocean conservation in South Africa, Hanli Prinsloo also works in Bermuda and Ecuador. As part of her desire to educate people about marine life, she makes films about protecting sharks (Image: Screengrab via YouTube) • How much do you know about the ocean? •Gallery: Celebrate Marine Month in South Africa • Top 50 Brands in South Africa named • Teen campaigns organ donation through social media • Sandton goes car-free for a month Compiled by Melissa JavanThe success of each of the 17 United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SGDs) would be the success of all, Hanli Prinsloo recently said at the World Economic Forum (WEF).The 17 SDGs include no poverty, zero hunger, good health and well-being, quality education, gender equality, clean water and sanitation, and affordable and clean energy. They were agreed for the world by the United Nations in August to continue from the Millennium Development Goals.Prinsloo, the chief executive officer of I Am Water Ocean Conservation Trust, said Goal 14 – on “life below water” – resonated with why she devoted her life and work to ocean conservation. “But as a woman and an African, every single one of the 17 SDGs will affect some part of my life,” she wrote on the WEF’s site.We are waterPrinsloo is an 11 times South African freediving record holder, filmmaker and avid ocean adventurer. In a TED Talk, she said: “I am nothing without the water inside me and the water around me.”TED began in 1984 as a conference where technology, entertainment and design converged. Today TED Talks cover almost all topics, from science to business to global issues. It is owned by a non-profit, non-partisan foundation that believes in the power of ideas to change attitudes, lives and, ultimately, the world.Prinsloo reminded her TED audience that one’s body consisted of more than 70% water. “This is even though we focus on air moving in and out of us, we are water. We move around in a world of air so we believe we are air.“Now we have become so used to breathing that we think it’s all we’ve done. But our first nine months of our lives we were in a watery world and we were born into this fantastically exciting world of smells and sights and sounds and air. All this air around us and then we forget about that watery world we come from,” she added.Using just one breathe, Prinsloo said, she could swim to a depth of 56m in the ocean, just using her arms and legs. “On one breathe I’ve held my breath in water for over six minutes and I am not the best in the world. Using weights to assist us and floatation devices to come back up, free divers have been down to up to 200m.“The most difficult thing I have learned is to trust myself and to trust what my body can do in water… The world record for men is over 11 minutes and that is not breathing pure oxygen. We know water; your body remembers water there’s a memory of water in us that we have just forgotten.”She challenged the audience to “spend some time in the water inside of you, in the water we have at our disposal and yes come on in the water is good”.“We are representatives of the ocean. I even see that with people who can’t swim who stand there and say to me: ‘I can’t swim but I love staring at the ocean.’ If you are an ocean gazer or explorer you’ve got that in you.”Watch Prinsloo pledge to protect the ocean, and explain why she was moved to do so:Why protect the ocean?In her report to the WEF, Prinsloo spoke about a study by the WWF and the Zoological Society of London, which said 40% of marine populations had halved since 1970. Many of the fish humans ate had posted a staggering 74% drop in population.“Oceans are the lifeblood,” she stressed. “Not only do 2.6 billion people depend on them for their primary source of protein, but more than half of the oxygen in the atmosphere is produced by the salty masses, while they absorb over 30% of CO2.”Chapter 5 of South Africa’s National Development Plan talks about protecting and enhancing the country’s environmental assets and natural resources. Prinsloo’s activism promotes this outcome of the plan. But it is not only a national issue; Goal 14 of the SDGs, she pointed out, had seven main targets, including a reduction of all kinds of marine pollution. It particularly mentioned land activities that resulted in marine pollution. Another target focused on community fishing practices and poverty.“As an ocean advocate, I have to believe that we can achieve SDG14.”More needed to be done to improve collaboration on this issue, especially between non-governmental organisations and governments, stakeholders and activists. “We know the challenges. The hard work now is to ensure that we work together to achieve the SDG14 targets – for the sake of the ocean and the planet.”I Am WaterI Am Water Ocean Conservation Trust was founded in South Africa in 2010. Its mandate is that humans and nature cannot survive without each other. “We believe ocean degradation is fundamentally due to human disconnect,” reads its website, “and the way to change the course for our oceans is engaging and educating individuals on their role for a healthy planet.”The aim for Prinsloo and her team is to make people fall in love with the ocean so that they will want to protect it. The trust’s projects include taking children from previously disadvantaged communities such as Masiphumelele township in Cape Town to the beach, teaching them to swim, and educating them about marine life and how to protect the ocean.Another project is raising awareness of the plight of shark populations around the world.Watch Prinsloo explain the importance of protecting sharks:Watch Prinsloo and others swim alongside sharks:last_img read more

WEF Africa 2016: The village of the future

first_img13 May 2016To technologically transform our villages, the government first needs to work on land reforms, Gisele Yitamben #af16 pic.twitter.com/oJulP69iNM— FACRA (@FACRA_Angola) May 12, 2016Panellists at the WEF on Africa 2016 session the Village of the Future included renewable energy expert Sameer Hajee, Babatunde Osotimehin director at the UN Population Fund (UNFPA), Millicom Africa CEO Cynthia Gordon and Cameroonian economist Gisele Yitamben.Kenyan entrepreneur James Mwangi moderated the session.The theme for the discussion asked the question How can rural economies become self-sufficient? The conversation covered a number of issues including:Moving from a consumer to producer mind-set;Fostering distributed manufacturing; and;Building on the strengths of their communities.The panel discussed at length the power of mobile technology and renewable energy in empowering rural communities to compete in the global market place.Issues and challenges such as climate change, gender equality and land reform were also weighed up against the backdrop of evolving African social and political structures.Watch the full panel discussion below:Source: WEF Africa 2016last_img read more

Yongnuo 50mm f/1.4: The Chinese Knockoff You’ve Been Waiting For

first_imgLens Construction6/7 Groups It’s no secret that photography and filmmaking is an expensive industry, so any opportunity to save a little money on quality is well received by consumers. This may shed some light on a shift in the gear industry…There will always be a demand for cheap equipment, but if more entry-level people begin purchasing less expensive ‘knockoff’ lenses, name-brand manufacturers may be forced to make lenses cheaper, effectively compromising quality for price.We’re going to be interested to see the quality of this lens. We are clearly not expecting it to be as good as the Canon 50mm, but eagerly await user tests.As of right now Yongnuo has not released a price or a release date for the 50mm f/1.4 lens. However, considering the price of the Canon is $400, we can probably expect to see the Yongnuo 50mm priced below $300.Is this lens going to be a good alternative to the Canon 50mm f1.4? Share your thoughts in the comments below. Aperture Blades8 Drive SystemDC motor Focal Length50mm Closest Focusing Distance0.45 m Filter Diameter58mm If you can’t beat ’em, create an exact copy and sell it for less?As far as Chinese knockoffs go Yongnuo is about as good as it gets. We’ve had some experience with shooting with a Yongnuo Speedlight and for the price you aren’t really going to find a better deal. Youngnuo products are primarily geared around lighting for photography. However, a recent announcement affirms that Yongnuo is expanding it’s product line by getting into the lens manufacturing business.One of these is a Canon Lens and the other is Yongnuo. Can you tell which one?Yongnuo has announced a 50mm f/1.4 that fits Canon EF lens mounts. The lens is a shameless ripoff of the similar Canon lens, but the specs are still pretty darn good. Most notably this cheap lens has 8 aperture blades making it a near replica of the Canon 50mm 1.4. The biggest difference comes in the form of the autofocus. The Canon has a patented Ultrasonic motor but the Yongnuo has a DC motor, so this might be a potential weak point in the Yongnuo lens. Here’s the rest of the specs:Yongnuo 50mm f/1.4 AF Lens Aperture Rangef/1.4-22last_img read more

10 months agoChelsea hero Essien: Very difficult for Hazard to resist Real Madrid

first_imgChelsea hero Essien: Very difficult for Hazard to resist Real Madridby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea hero Michael Essien admits Eden Hazard is likely to be tempted by Real Madrid.The Blues value their prized asset in excess of £150m but Essien has hinted that his old team-mate might want to test himself in La Liga.Essien told the Daily Express: “Hazard is one of the best players in the world.“He’s been playing in the Premier League very well and looks fantastic at the moment.“The interest of Real Madrid, I only hear from people in the media.“But I mean when Real Madrid come calling… every player would love to play for them.“He’s happy at Chelsea though and hopefully we can keep him.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

a month agoAndy Carroll in line for second Newcastle debut

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Andy Carroll in line for second Newcastle debutby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveAndy Carroll is in line for a second Newcastle United debut against Brighton tomorrow.Carroll hasn’t played since February towards the end of an injury-plagued six years at West Ham, and underwent surgery to address a long-standing ankle problem in April.However, the striker, who returned to Newcastle on a free transfer in August, is now closing in on a return to first team football after impressing in training. Newcastle boss Steve Bruce said: “As long as he comes through today (Friday) OK – touch wood, he’ll come through today OK – but yes, he will be involved, which is good news for all of us.”At the top end of the pitch, him and Allan Saint-Maximin as well, we have been a little bit short – and Dwight Gayle is another one – so we have had limited options up top, but certainly the return of Andy and Allan give us something which obviously can only benefit us.” last_img read more

Texas Coach Vance Bedford Goes On Rant About Tradition When Asked About Alternate Uniforms

first_imgThe Texas Longhorns football team running onto the field.STILLWATER, OK – OCTOBER 29: The Texas Longhorns run onto the field before a game against the Oklahoma State Cowboys October 29, 2005 at Boone Pickens Stadium in Stillwater, Oklahoma. (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)Last weekend against Kansas, Texas honored safety Freddie Steinmark, subject of the upcoming film My All-American, by wearing 1969 throwback uniforms.Texas wearing throwback uniforms as tribute to Freddie Steinmark. (via @Uniformswag) pic.twitter.com/YVnQnacZN0— ESPN CollegeFootball (@ESPNCFB) November 8, 2015Texas is a program with a classic look that rarely veers from what works, but most were probably okay with these clean-looking throwbacks. When asked about other alternate uniforms that some teams go to, defensive coordinator Vance Bedford went on a long rant about traditional powers in college football, that many fans who don’t like wild uniforms will appreciate.Asked Texas DC Vance Bedford about alternate unis today. His 600-word answer addressed a whole lot more. pic.twitter.com/q2mdv5UVkp— Max Olson (@max_olson) November 11, 2015We don’t think Bedford will be looking for a job at Oregon any time soon.last_img read more

City fields closed until further notice

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The City of Fort St. John has decided to close sports fields in local parks until further notice.The closing of the fields is due to the excessive rainfall that has hit the city since last night. Youth soccer, as well as minor baseball, will be cancelled because of this.The City’s Communications Coordinator Ryan Harvey explained that the fields will likely stay closed until they are safe to play on. The city will send out an update once they decide to reopen the fields.last_img read more

North Peace Fall Fairs Pioneers of the Year

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – This year’s ‘Pioneers of the Year’ have been named at the 2019 North Peace Fall Fair.An annual tradition for the Fall Fair, the Fair Committee chooses two individuals or couples to be the North Peace Fall Fair Pioneers of the Year. This year’s recipients are Dennis Davidson and Herbert and Katrina Keuth.The chosen Pioneers are awarded a plaque and receive a gift certificate for a dinner for two. The criteria to be nominated as a recipient of the Pioneer of the Year include; Must have been involved in agriculture in the North Peace Must have been a participant in the Fall Fair Must be over the age of 70 years Must have been a past member or faithful volunteer to the Fall Fair Must have lived a minimum of 25 years in the North Peacelast_img read more