PATH Scholarship Comes at Right Time for Medical Student

first_img Without a $1-million scholarship from the Programme of Advancement Through Health and Education (PATH), Chedukia Langley, a fourth-year medical student at the University of the West Indies (UWI), says she would not have been able to meet her financial obligations to the university, and faced the possibility of being deregistered. Without a $1-million scholarship from the Programme of Advancement Through Health and Education (PATH), Chedukia Langley, a fourth-year medical student at the University of the West Indies (UWI), says she would not have been able to meet her financial obligations to the university, and faced the possibility of being deregistered.Chedukia, who spoke to JIS News at PATH’s 15th anniversary scholarship awards ceremony held at the Mona Visitors’ Lodge in St. Andrew on October 27, says with the money received, she was able to clear outstanding fees for last year and make a deposit on this year’s tuition.The 22-year-old, who started UWI in 2014, tells JIS News that even with two scholarships, she was unable to meet her full tuition cost of $3.5 million per annum for her Bachelor of Medicine,Bachelor of Surgery degree, in addition to other expenses, including travelling, as she is a commuting student.“I was at the brink of dropping out, because, although I had gotten scholarships, I still owed the university, and I did not know how I was going to pay,” she says.The student, who has been a PATH beneficiary since high school, says that when she heard that she would be a scholarship recipient she was “beyond elated”.“PATH is aimed at breaking the generational cycle (of poverty). They recognised that I needed the help, and they knew I could help other persons as well as contribute to Jamaica’s economic development. They made a wise investment in me,” Chedukia says.The former Glenmuir High School student, who was born in St. Elizabeth, tells JIS News that becoming a medical doctor is a dream she has had from a young age.“I wanted to become a doctor from I was very small. I always said I wanted to go to Glenmuir High School and become a doctor. Medicine is a rewarding career, and you get to help people where you can restore someone’s health,” she notes.Chedukia says it has taken much sacrifice to get to this point, including leaving home to live with an aunt in Old Harbour, and she is determined to persevere in order to make life better for herself and her family.“I can’t say I had an excellent childhood, but it was okay. I wasn’t living with my dad or my mom at one point in my life. We lived in one room with a zinc kitchen and (pit) latrine. My mother had six children, but it was okay,” the young woman tells JIS News.Amidst all her challenges, Chedukia says she remained determined to excel, scoring grade ones in Caribbean Secondary Education Certificate (CSEC) Mathematics, English Language, History,Spanish, Food and Nutrition, Physical Education, Office Administration, Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Electronic Document Preparation and Management (EPDM).Chedukia tells JIS News that her next major goal is to complete her degree programme. She intends to work in the public sector and then enter private practice.PATH is an initiative by the Government of Jamaica with support from donor partners, such as the World Bank, Inter-American Development Bank and other multilateral and bilateral agencies.It is aimed at delivering benefits by way of cash grants to the poorest and most vulnerable persons in the society.The programme is administrated by the Ministry of Labour and Social Security, and the main objectives are to increase educational attainment and improve health outcomes of the poor, break the intergenerational cycle of poverty, reduce child labour by requiring children to have minimum attendance in school, and serve as a safety net by preventing families from falling further into poverty in the event of adverse shock.As at June 2017, 70.62 per cent of registered PATH beneficiaries were children up to 18 years old.In celebration of its 15th year of service to the people of Jamaica, PATH offered tertiary scholarships valued at $15 million to beneficiaries pursuing bachelor’s degrees at accredited institutions, to assist in covering the cost of tuition and books.Seventeen students pursuing bachelor’s degrees in law, medicine, actuarial science, engineering, chemistry, plant biology and psychology received those awards.The funds will be disbursed over a period of up to three years, with the condition that the recipients maintain a GPA of at least 2.5. “PATH is aimed at breaking the generational cycle (of poverty). They recognised that I needed the help, and they knew I could help other persons as well as contribute to Jamaica’s economic development. They made a wise investment in me,” Chedukia says. The programme is administrated by the Ministry of Labour and Social Security, and the main objectives are to increase educational attainment and improve health outcomes of the poor, break the intergenerational cycle of poverty, reduce child labour by requiring children to have minimum attendance in school, and serve as a safety net by preventing families from falling further into poverty in the event of adverse shock. Story Highlightslast_img read more

Pulitzer Prizes Open Three More Categories to Magazines

first_img The board noted that all entries should still come from U.S.-based organizations that publish at least weekly and that are “primarily dedicated to original news reporting and coverage of ongoing stories.” The Pulitzer Prize Board announced that online and print magazines will be eligible for consideration in three additional categories: International Reporting, Criticism and Editorial Cartooning, beginning with the 2016 prizes, which honor work published this year. No magazines won in either of the eligible categories last year, although The New Yorker’s Jennifer Gonnerman was named a finalist in Feature Writing for her article, “Before the Law,” detailing the story of a teenager who spent three years on Rikers Island without trial after being accused of stealing. “Magazines are adapting to the digital age and accelerating their publication schedules to report on a timely basis consistent with what newspapers do,” said Mike Pride, administrator of the prizes, in a statement. “The board is attuned to this media convergence and is opening our competition in light of it.” Entries for the 2016 Pulitzer Prizes will open in December, with a deadline of January 25. Traditionally limited to newspaper journalism, the prizes first expanded the Investigative Reporting and Feature Writing categories to include magazine entries last year. The announcement comes a day after board chair Paul Gigot, editor of The Wall Street Journal, issued a call for wider participation in 2016 among U.S. news organizations large and small. The move also recognizes the reshaped role of magazines in a changing media environment.last_img read more

The Wilmington Insider For November 15 2018

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below is a round-up of what’s going on in Wilmington on Thursday, November 15, 2018:Happening Today:Weather: A chance of snow after 5pm. Partly sunny, with a high near 32. Light and variable wind. Chance of precipitation is 30%. Little or no snow accumulation expected.Municipal Meetings: The Wilmington Elderly Services Commission is scheduled to meet at 1:30pm at the Senior Center. Read the agenda HERE. … The Wilmington Water & Sewer Commission is scheduled to meet at 5:30pm in Town Hall’s Room 9. Read the agenda HERE.At Town Hall: The Metro North Regional Housing Services Office’s Housing Coordinator Laurie Stanton will be holding office hours from 2pm to 4:30pm in Wilmington Town Hall’s Small Conference Room. Stanton will assist residents with their affordable housing questions. The Metro North Regional Housing Services Office helps people find affordable housing in Reading, North Reading, Wilmington, and Saugus. If you are unable to attend office hours on this date, future dates will be announced. Laurie can also be reached at her Reading Office at 781-942-6667 during normal business hours.In The Community: The Wilmington Community Chorus rehearses every Thursday, from 7pm to 9pm, at St. Elizabeth’s (4 Forest Street). New members welcome. No tryout required. Learn more HERE.Live Music: Pianist Ricky Lauria performs at Tremezzo (2 Lowell Street) at 8pm.At The Library: Jazz and Bossa: Haley Peltz & Molly Flannery at 2:30pm. First Look Book Group at 2:30pm. Tech Buddies Drop-In at 6:30pm. Novel Ideas Fiction Book Group at 7pm. English Conversation Group at 7pm. [Learn more and register HERE.]At The Senior Center: Art Class at 10am. Aerobics at 10:30am. Knitting/Crocheting at 11am. Meditation Class at 12:15pm. Game Day at 1pm. Ceramics at 1pm. [Learn more HERE.]At Town Museum: The Town Museum (430 Salem Street) is open from 10am to 2pm. Come explore Wilmington’s history. Free admission.(NOTE: What did I miss? Let me know by commenting below, commenting on the Facebook page, or emailing wilmingtonapple@gmail.com. I may be able to update this post.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedAffordable Housing Assistance To Be Offered To Residents At Town Hall On September 10In “Government”The Wilmington Insider For October 2, 2018In “5 Things To Do Today”The Wilmington Insider For January 30, 2018In “5 Things To Do Today”last_img read more