Sadly Tragedy Intrudes On Pro Athletes Lives Too As

Wayne Ellington, a reserve guard for the Los Angeles Lakers, lost his father to street violence in Philadelphia, a reminder that the glitz and wealth of professional sports life can be intruded upon with tragedy, too.You see them on television. You read about their hefty contracts. They are living their dreams. But for all they seem to have, they are not invincible. And they hurt just as any of us hurt.Just ask Ellington, whose father of the same name was shot in his car by unknown assailants at an intersection in Philadelphia Sunday night. Senseless violence. Again.“My family and I are devastated by the news of my father’s murder on Sunday night in Philadelphia,” Ellington said in a statement released by the Lakers. “We appreciate everyone’s support and ask that you respect the privacy of our family during this very difficult time.”Michael Jordan’s father was killed in similar fashion in North Carolina. Brian Shaw, coach of the Denver Nuggets, lost his parents and a sister in a horrific car accident. Mike Tyson had a daughter die in a freak accident. And on and on.“This is our livelihood, but it’s still just a game,” Lakers coach Byron Scott said. “This thing that’s happening with Wayne is real life. It kind of puts everything in perspective, too.”Ellington is in his sixth season after a stellar career at North Carolina. Police say there was no motive for the murder and there are no suspects. There’s only a family left behind to grieve. Ellington is on an indefinite leave of absence from the Lakers.“As a team, we’ll obviously keep going on and trying to win games, but I think all of us, every now and then— during the game, after the game, before the game—will have Wayne on our mind,” Scott said.No one is insulated from the horrors of the world. Money and fame can provide most everything except that. We get reminders every so often. . . sadly. read more

The Strange Dynasty Of The San Francisco Giants Is Over Yes It

Seasons ✓✓ Made Playoffs?Won Division?Won Pennant?Won World Series?Losing record90+ Wins?100+ Wins?Dynasty points Angels200220091112825.0 In general, a season contributes nothing to the dynasty if the team fails to make the playoffs or win 90 games.Source: Baseball Databank Dodgers1946196642772133.3 -3 ✓✓+4 ✓ ✓ Yankees19201943106162425.0 Dodgers1973199121381942.1 +3 +2 The weirdest dynasties ever?Among MLB dynasties (as defined by Bill James’s point system), largest share of seasons during a run that contributed zero points to the dynasty +5 Source: billjamesonline.com ✗ Cardinals196319712104944.4% ✓✓✓✓✓+6 ✓✓+2 ✓✓ ✗-2 Phillies197619831142825.0 Giants201020163103742.9 ✗ Yankees1976198621931127.3 ✓✓ +1 But every dynasty also has to end. When a team has a zero-point season, its rolling tally drops at least 2 points (it falls by 3 if the team also has a losing record). When the rolling tally dips to zero again, or the team has three straight pointless seasons, the dynasty is definitively over.2And the dynasty’s final season is retroactively set to the last year in which the team picked up any dynasty points.This decade’s Giants officially qualified as a dynasty by hitting 10 points after the 2014 World Series victory, ultimately extending the span of their run from 2010 to 2016 with one additional playoff appearance.3Technically the Giants haven’t had three straight zero-point seasons or a running total of zero yet (their running total was 3 through 2018, which was their second-straight zero-point season), but our model gives them next to no chance of picking up any dynasty points — and thereby extending the run — in 2019. But of those seven seasons, three contributed nothing to (and therefore actively detracted from) San Francisco’s running dynasty total. Among the 38 distinct teams that James’s system considers dynasties, only one — the 1963-71 St. Louis Cardinals — had a higher share of their “dynasty years” contribute nothing to the dynasty itself. ✓✓+3 ✓+1 ✓✓✓ Red Sox2002201841851729.4 TeamStartEndTitlesMax Dynasty PtsZero-PtTotalZero-Pt Share Over the course of the past decade, the San Francisco Giants put together one of the strangest dynasties in baseball history. And now it is officially coming to an end.The Giants still have five players left over from their 2014 championship season, but the returns have diminished greatly since then. The team is in last place in the National League West; the FiveThirtyEight model currently predicts it to finish 70-92, which would be one of the worst records in franchise history.1Technically the 2017 version was even worse, although that team at least had injuries to blame (and a playoff appearance the year before to suggest a potential turnaround). And it could get worse by season’s end, with ace Madison Bumgarner (among others) on the trade block.The Giants got here in part by trying to extend the dynasty past its expiration date. But who can blame them? When a team’s initial successes defy the odds, it can be especially difficult to know when a downturn is permanent or just a detour along the road to another title. This is especially true of San Francisco, which sandwiched two mediocre nonplayoff seasons in between World Series titles. But we come here not to bury the Giants’ dynasty but to praise it — and imagine how Farhan Zaidi, the new president of baseball operations, might construct another one where the original once stood.So what makes the Giants’ dynasty of the 2010s — and yes, it was a bona fide dynasty — maybe the most interesting ever?Up and downThe simplest answer to that question lies with the team’s every-other-year pattern of success. In even-numbered years from 2010 through 2016, the Giants’ winning percentage was .557; in odd years, it was only .506. But plenty of teams have gone on wild championship roller-coaster rides. The Giants’ version was one of the most memorable because of how unexpectedly it materialized and how difficult it was to get a handle on, even while it was happening.Sabermetrics pioneer Bill James has a method of determining dynastic runs that involves giving out points for seasons of various accomplishments. He keeps a running tally of a team’s dynasty points after each season; whenever a team’s running total hits 10, it automatically becomes a dynasty — of which there have been only 38 in baseball history. Cardinals1926193531731030.0 ✓✓ Bill James’s dynasty accounting systemWhat an MLB team must do in a season to earn or lose dynasty points Keeping in mind that the majority of San Francisco’s dynasty took place in the double-wild-card era, where in theory it is easier to snag an occasional playoff berth to keep the run going, you could argue that a Giants-like run is even harder to pull off now than during the Cardinals’ era (most of which happened when the “playoffs” consisted only of the World Series).If all of this sounds like a knock on what San Francisco accomplished, it’s not. It actually just makes it more fascinating: Only nine teams in history ever won three World Series in a five-year period anyway, and none of those had anywhere near as many ups and downs — nor proved as many doubters wrong — as the 2010-16 Giants did.Growing a dynasty … on top of a dynasty?Surprisingly, that run actually began on the heels of another dynasty, at least according to James’s accounting system. The 2000-04 Giants hit a running total of 10 points as well, despite not winning any championships, because they won at least 90 games five years in a row with two division crowns, a pennant in 2002 and 100 victories in 2003. That team was powered by Barry Bonds at the peak of his historic hitting powers,4And with Bonds allegedly benefiting from performance-enhancing drugs. with help from second baseman Jeff Kent, pitcher Jason Schmidt and shortstop Rich Aurilia. But the club’s performance fell after much of Bonds’s supporting cast signed elsewhere (SB Nation recently made a great video about the bitter Bonds-Kent feud), and the Giants’ main attraction in the ensuing seasons was Bonds’s largely joyless pursuit of Hank Aaron’s all-time home run record.By 2008, Bonds was out of baseball and the Giants were terrible, winning just 72 games. They had just three players who had been ranked among Baseball America’s Top 100 prospects in the previous few seasons: pitchers Matt Cain, Tim Lincecum and Jonathan Sanchez. Their farm system ranked just 23rd in baseball. Practically nothing about the Giants’ situation suggested that another dynasty was around the corner.But as bleak as San Francisco’s outlook appeared to be, the ingredients were largely in place for the run that was to come. To go with Cain and Lincecum, fellow dynasty cornerstones Bumgarner, Posey, Brandon Crawford and Brandon Belt would all be drafted in 2007-09, while third baseman Pablo Sandoval and reliever Sergio Romo both made their MLB debuts in the summer of 2008. Nine players were on all three Giants championship squads — Posey, Bumgarner, Cain, Sandoval, Romo, Lincecum, Santiago Casilla, Jeremy Affeldt and Javier Lopez — and of those, six were either acquired by or made their MLB debuts for San Francisco in the 18-month span between May 2007 and November 2008. The team had also hired manager Bruce Bochy away from the division-rival San Diego Padres prior to the 2007 season.The Giants’ penchant for acquiring and developing homegrown talent helps explain a good amount of their success earlier this decade. From 2010 through 2016, only two teams (the St. Louis Cardinals and Tampa Bay Rays) got more total wins above replacement5Averaging together the WAR versions found at Baseball-Reference.com and FanGraphs. from players who initially debuted with the team than San Francisco did. That group was headlined by Posey and Bumgarner, both of whom were top-10 draft picks, but it also included a fourth-rounder (Crawford), fifth-rounder (Belt) and 18th-rounder (Matt Duffy) who each peaked as 4-win players or better despite their lack of pedigree.Spare parts to the rescueThose Giants were made all the more interesting by the odd veteran pieces that filled in the gaps around the homegrown talent, particularly in the postseason. Journeyman castoffs Andres Torres and Aubrey Huff led the 2010 Giants in regular-season WAR, while that year’s NLCS MVP was Cody Ross (who had been claimed off waivers from the Marlins in August), and the World Series MVP was veteran shortstop Edgar Renteria, who had missed more than half the regular season with injuries.The trend continued in subsequent title runs. Outfielder Angel Pagan rebounded from a disappointing 2011 season with the Mets to produce 4.4 WAR for the Giants in their 2012 championship campaign. Melky Cabrera, on his fourth team in four years, was the All-Star Game’s MVP and hit an NL-best .346 that year before being suspended for performance-enhancing drugs (and recusing himself from the batting crown). Second baseman Marco Scutaro, picked up via trade in July, claimed NLCS MVP honors. After Posey and Bumgarner, frenetic outfielder Hunter Pence, acquired four days after Scutaro, was the Giants’ best player by WAR in 2013 and 2014, posting an 1.167 on-base plus slugging in the 2014 World Series. Even in 2016, obscure third baseman Conor Gillaspie provided playoff heroics when his ninth-inning home run won the NL wild-card game over the Mets.This quirky combination of young draftees and veteran reclamation projects helped each Giants championship team forge a different identity. The 2010 team was widely identified with Lincecum, Cain and eccentric, heavily bearded closer Brian Wilson. The 2012 version had evolved to become Posey’s team (he was named NL MVP) with Sandoval, the “Kung Fu Panda,” inheriting the role of postseason talisman from Wilson. And the 2014 season was all about the dominance of Bumgarner, who became virtually unhittable in October, winning the NLCS and World Series MVPs. Bochy and general manager Brian Sabean continually found ways to retool the roster on the fly, returning it to a championship level even after a 76-win season in 2013 suggested to many that San Francisco’s days of winning it all were probably over.An extraordinary timeThe Giants’ dynasty was also lucky to come along during an era of comparative parity in Major League Baseball. In 2015, my colleague Rob Arthur and I noted that MLB was getting tougher and tougher to predict during the decade of the 2010s, which happened to overlap with the entirety of San Francisco’s run to that point. In particular, the share of variance in team records explained by luck — which tracks with how compressed team records are across the league — had spiked upward to 64 percent that season, the highest mark since right after the 1994 strike.The Giants weren’t particularly dominant on paper during their dynastic years, never finishing higher than sixth in baseball in Sports-Reference.com’s Simple Rating System during any of their championship seasons, but it was the perfect moment to be a good team that gets hot at exactly the right time. Although it is unlikely that San Francisco’s World Series runs were wholly (or even mostly) the product of making the playoffs and having the postseason crapshoot fall in their favor three times, there’s no denying that the Giants’ path was made easier by the lack of super-teams across the rest of MLB.And now, those days are gone. (Not that it would help the current Giants much if they weren’t.) Starting in 2016, the league became very much top-heavy and thus much easier to predict than it had been earlier in the decade. The simultaneous emergence of juggernauts in the Houston Astros, Boston Red Sox, New York Yankees, Los Angeles Dodgers, Chicago Cubs and Cleveland Indians over the past few seasons have left the next tier of teams feeling the squeeze. Yes, some of today’s reduced parity also owes to the surplus of tanking teams trying to emulate the championship runs of the Cubs and Astros, but the teams at the top are also just stacked with talent. That has made it much tougher to be a merely solid ballclub with World Series aspirations.The aftermathAfter falling short against the Cubs in the 2016 NL Division Series, the Giants hoped to return to contention with largely the same group plus ex-Nationals closer Mark Melancon (who’d been good the previous season). Instead, Bumgarner injured himself in an early season dirt bike accident, Melancon was terrible, and the team collapsed to 64 wins. Then San Francisco doubled down on reviving its even-year magic in 2018 by trading for 30-something stars Andrew McCutchen and Evan Longoria. It didn’t work: Longoria was a disappointment at 1.2 WAR, McCutchen was traded to the Yankees at midseason, and Bumgarner was injured again. After 73 wins last year and this season’s 20-26 start, and facing Bochy’s retirement at the end of 2019, the franchise has finally begun staring down the specter of a rebuild.It’s easy to look back with hindsight and criticize the moves San Francisco made to try to keep its window of contention open. Well after the 2014 championship, for instance, the Giants signed pitchers Johnny Cueto, Jeff Samardzija and Melancon to long-term deals totaling $282 million, which looks like a terrible waste now — as well as a betrayal of the dynasty’s original homegrown roots.But this was also the same team that rode out a playoff absence in 2011 to win again in 2012, and a 76-win disappointment in 2013 to win again in 2014. As Bumgarner told the L.A. Times before this season, “Pretty much every year we’ve won, we were not expected to win.”The retool-on-the-fly mindset served the Giants well — until it didn’t.As much as the failure of recent big-name acquisitions to recapture their former glory has hurt the Giants, another big factor has been the failure of the team’s homegrown core to age gracefully — and the lack of anything in the pipeline behind it. Although Crawford can still make the occasional spectacular play, he is down from a 5-win player in 2016 to a subreplacement one now, and he’ll make $15.2 million each of the next two seasons after 2019. Belt was worth 4.2 WAR in 2016; now he’s on pace for a more middling 2.2 WAR in 2019 despite his $17.2 million salary, which also repeats in 2020 and 2021. Duffy fell off in 2016 and was traded for Matt Moore, who was miserable for the Giants in 2017 and was himself dealt for peanuts.Even with Bumgarner healthy, the Giants have the league’s worst starting rotation according to WAR. And recent drafts have produced little of note. The farm system ranked 26th in Keith Law’s preseason rankings. Things suddenly look dire again.Rebuilding the next dynastyWith Sabean’s successor, Bobby Evans, removed from his post as general manager last September, the man tasked with rebuilding the Giants now is former Dodgers GM Farhan Zaidi, who has gained a reputation as an innovator and a genius since leaving his doctoral program at the University of California, Berkeley to join the Oakland A’s front office under billion-dollar Billy Beane in 2005.Zaidi began shaking up San Francisco’s usual methods with a seemingly endless stream of anonymous signings before the season, in the hopes that at least some of them turn into viable major leaguers. That dizzying roster carousel did not let up once the season got underway, either. The team has started to employ modern pitching tactics like using an opener (which went poorly) and having position players like Sandoval throw mop-up innings (which went well!).But Zaidi has also run into friction six months into his new job. Already a figure of suspicion among Giants fans for his Dodger background, Zaidi was booed by season-ticket holders (granted, at Zaidi’s own urging) during a preseason meet-and-greet after he mentioned potentially using the opener. More seriously, he was openly criticized by Derek Holland after the pitcher was demoted from the starting rotation.Maybe all the constant roster-shuffling and other analytics-minded front-office techniques will pay off for San Francisco in the long run. But for now, the Giants are a bad team that can only get worse. The players are noticing — and so are the fans. AT&T Park was home to baseball’s third-best attendance mark as recently as 2017, but no team has shed more fans per game this season than San Francisco, whose 2019 attendance is down by more than 6,000 as compared with last year.How long will the Giants’ rebuild last? It might take a while to clear the current roster’s worst financial obligations from the books. Even in a world without Bumgarner, the team has $124 million committed to just seven players next year, with a payroll that could balloon to $172 million after arbitration and options are picked up. But as San Francisco’s ill-fated late push to sign Bryce Harper showed, the team hasn’t ruled out shelling out money for talent despite starting a new chapter in franchise history. Zaidi’s tightrope walk between alienating one of baseball’s best fan bases and genuinely refreshing the roster should be interesting to watch over the next few seasons.But it does also mean that the Giants dynasty of the early teens is firmly in the rearview mirror. What San Francisco accomplished then still defies statistical explanation to a certain degree, even acknowledging that most dynasties need an unlikely string of good fortune to build a great roster with long-term staying power. Through a combination of strong starting pitching, an impressive homegrown core and unbelievably shrewd veteran pickups, the Giants put together one of baseball’s most improbable strings of championships ever — a run that will be better appreciated only as it recedes into the realm of history. Now we have to see what Zaidi can do as a follow-up act.Check out our latest MLB predictions. read more

Rethinking The NFLs Rooney Rule For More Diversity At The Top

As word spread quickly in January 2007 that Mike Tomlin would be the next head coach of the Pittsburgh Steelers, no one needed to explain the significance of the move to Steve Jackson. Then a safeties coach with the Washington Redskins, Jackson was among the many African-American assistants rooting for Tomlin to get the job. Just a few years earlier, Tomlin, who had just completed his first season as the Minnesota Vikings’ defensive coordinator, probably wouldn’t have been on the short list for one of the most prestigious coaching gigs in professional sports. But under the Rooney Rule, times were changing.“For me, that’s the one that really stood out,” said Jackson, now the Tennessee Titans’ assistant secondary coach. “It was the Steelers. That’s one of those jobs that everyone looks at. And he wasn’t the leading candidate when he walked in for the interview, but he got in that room and he made his case. That’s what we all want: just to have a real chance to compete for the job. A lot of us [black coaches] looked at that and said, ‘Yeah.’”There’s no debating that the Rooney Rule has had a positive impact on the NFL. By providing owners with the first leaguewide tool to make hiring potentially more inclusive, the NFL took a significant step toward changing its culture. The rule continues to be expanded, and major corporations have followed the league’s lead. But in a workplace in which the overwhelming majority of players are African-American, the NFL has many more opportunities to strengthen the rule and further increase diversity in its management ranks.In place since 2003 for head coaches and expanded in 2009 to include general manager jobs and equivalent front-office positions, the rule — named after Dan Rooney, Pittsburgh Steelers chairman and onetime head of the league’s diversity committee — mandates that an NFL team must interview at least one minority candidate for these jobs. The rule, however, has two fatal flaws: the temptation to substitute sham interviews in place of a search for real diversity, and coordinator-level positions, a crucial step to head-coaching jobs, are not under the umbrella.The NFL did recently expand the rule again to include women: For all executive openings in the commissioner’s office, a woman must be interviewed. The San Francisco 49ers were the first team to formally adopt the practice, but the same flaws still apply.But the league did provide a blueprint for corporate America to improve its poor hiring record when it comes to diversity. Facebook, Pinterest, Intel, Xerox and Amazon are among the major companies that have instituted their own version of the rule. Even the Pentagon has explored using some form of the rule to diversify its officer corps.“The Rooney Rule really has become the best practice for diversity and inclusion,” said Robert Gulliver, the NFL’s executive vice president of human resources and chief diversity officer. “The Rooney Rule is all about access and opportunity, and it’s exciting to see where we are now after having the Rooney Rule in place for 12 years when you look at what the Rooney Rule has delivered.”In the 12 seasons before the rule was instituted, the NFL had only six non-white head coaches. In 12 seasons under the rule, the league has added 14 head coaches of color. From the NFL’s standpoint, there were other encouraging numbers last season regarding diversity. The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sports at the University of Central Florida found that:At the start of last season, there were six head coaches of color, one more than in 2014. In 2011, the NFL had an all-time high of eight head coaches of color.There were seven African-American general managers in 2015 and for the ninth consecutive year, there were at least five general managers of color.Eight of the last 18 Super Bowl teams have had either an African-American head coach or general manager.Clearly, minorities have made modest strides in filling leadership positions. The problem is, there are 32 NFL teams. Even at its highest point, minority representation among coaches was a meager 25 percent. Almost 68 percent of the NFL’s players are African-American, but there are no African-American team presidents, and only one team president of color. Although the NFL received an A grade for overall racial-hiring practices from Central Florida, only 19.4 percent of the league’s professional positions — front-office and business-operations personnel — were filled by “people of color” in 2015. The numbers tell the story: There’s still plenty of work to do.Jeremi Duru wrote the book on the Rooney Rule. Literally. In Advancing The Ball: Race, Reformation, and the Quest for Equal Coaching Opportunity in the NFL, Duru masterfully details the history of the process that resulted in the rule. Duru, a law professor at American University’s Washington College of Law, agrees that the rule is not perfect, but “the whole idea of it is to prompt kind of a culture change in the league,” he said. “It’s not that the outcome of each particular interviewing season is going to vindicate the rule, but rather that the rule will put in place the sense that, in order to be the best, you have to think broadly. It’s the idea that in order to succeed and be competitive, you have to look at a deep pool of candidates.”One of the biggest criticisms of the rule is that it hasn’t effected change fast enough. For the rule to have been in place so long, some African-American commentators have argued, the NFL should have many more minorities in the highest-ranking positions. “It’s extremely difficult to eradicate a long-standing problem quickly,” Duru said. “The Emancipation Proclamation itself isn’t going to be a panacea. But it creates a culture where there’s no longer lawful slavery, and where we start to see progress, slowly but surely.“In the end in the NFL, hopefully, the idea is that it really becomes clear that the best coaches come from all sorts of different places. And if you think broadly about coaching and you slow down and take time with your hire, you’re going to find yourself with the best outcome. It’s not a consequence of the rule itself, but of the culture that the rule has ushered in.”Unfortunately for the NFL, the public perception is that sham interviews are integral to the league’s culture. Invariably each season, rumors have swirled that some teams interviewed African-American candidates only to comply with the rule. In January, the timing and execution of the Philadelphia Eagles’ hiring of new coach Doug Pederson raised questions about whether they had violated the spirit of the rule. The Eagles interviewed Duce Staley, a former Philadelphia player and current assistant coach on the team. Staley had never been a coordinator and only served as a position coach for three seasons. To many league observers, it appeared the Eagles had skirted the rule by interviewing an in-house candidate who obviously lacked the experience to be a head coach.That’s where the Fritz Pollard Alliance comes in. Together with the league’s front office, they determine whether a team’s interview process is legitimate. In the first year of the rule, commissioner Roger Goodell’s predecessor, Paul Tagliabue, fined former Detroit Lions general manager Matt Millen $200,000 for “failing to discharge his duties” under the rule.Although the specter of fines should serve as a deterrent to teams violating the rule, there’s another step the league could take to ensure compliance besides the removal of draft picks: require teams to provide transcripts of interviews with minority candidates. That way, the Fritz Pollard Alliance and the commissioner’s office could judge for themselves whether teams adhered to the spirit of the rule.“The Rooney Rule requires that there be a meaningful interview of a person of color, not just an interview,” Duru said. “Any mechanism that can be used to ensure an interview that is meaningful should be on the table.”However, among NFL decision-makers, there’s no momentum for detailed transcripts to become part of the process. “What is important is getting interview feedback,” the NFL’s Gulliver said. “We really do find that getting feedback, getting candidate feedback, on what worked and what didn’t work, and what can even be better the next time, will help candidates as they continue their quests to become a head coach or a general manager.”That being said, covering more potential candidates under the rule would seem to be a logical next step. Generally, coordinators have the most responsibility among assistant coaches. Owners often pluck coordinators from successful teams to become head coaches. If there were more minority coordinators in the pipeline, theoretically, there would be more minorities in the applicant pool for head coaching positions. The Rooney Rule does nothing to address that basic fact.In response to the NFL’s horrible hiring record after the 2012 season (eight head coaches and seven general managers were fired; 15 white guys were hired), the Fritz Pollard Alliance proposed that coordinator-level and team president positions should be covered under the rule. The NFL rejected the proposal, but in 2013 the league did restart the Career Development Symposium, which previously ran from 1998-2008.The commissioner’s office requested that teams send two representatives, including at least one person of color, who aspire to be general managers and head coaches, to a three-day program at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Besides networking with decision-makers from throughout the league, participants honed their interview skills through presentations and panel discussions. (In March, the league had its first Women’s Career Development Symposium.)But remember: Last season, the league had only six head coaches of color and seven African-American general managers. Obviously, the Career Development Symposium didn’t hobble efforts to improve minority hiring — but how much did it help? It just seems that including coordinator positions under the rule could be another major turning point in the ongoing struggle to level the playing field.In ESPN The Magazine’s Feb. 8 Super Bowl 50 Issue, senior writer Mina Kimes wrote that white position coaches and assistants are more than twice as likely to be promoted to coordinator than their African-American counterparts, according to research from professors at Georgetown, George Washington, Emory and Iowa State University. Moreover, those promotions occur regardless of the white coaches’ performance, experience and coaching background. The data shouldn’t be ignored.The Titans’ Jackson is a 13-year NFL assistant. Despite his experience, Jackson knows it’s downright impossible to make the leap from an assistant coach to a head coach without first being a coordinator.“There’s always a network, an inner circle, and then there are others,” he said. “And if you’re in the others, you have to do everything you can to get in the door.”The argument against expanding the rule to include coordinator positions is that head coaches should be allowed to pick their staffs without any restrictions on interviewing. There may be something to that.During the 2007 and 2008 seasons, Brian Stewart directed the Dallas Cowboys’ defense. If coordinators are covered under the rule, Stewart envisions the potential for conflict. “That would be rough,” said Stewart, now a college coach at Nebraska who works with defensive backs. “You really have to leave picking those guys [coordinators] to the head coaches. They have to be allowed to choose their own people.“That’s one of the benefits of reaching the level of head coach. And if you don’t let them interview only the guys they want to interview, it could really open up a can of worms when you talk about relationships on the staff. If guys feel like a coordinator didn’t get the job the right way, there could be a lot of resentment from all the other assistants. It could be a problem. It could be a big problem.”Of course, there’s often resistance to change. When the rule was instituted, many within the league suggested head coaches wouldn’t have credibility if they were hired as a result of the process. But who would argue that great coaches such as Hall of Famer Tony Dungy, Tomlin and Carolina Panthers’ Ron Rivera lack credibility? The Steelers’ pick of Tomlin worked out spectacularly.The Rooney Rule is still evolving and growing pains are part of the process. But with the NFL on the right track, it’s definitely not time to slow down. More stories from The Undefeated:Serena: The embodiment of it all by LZ GrandersonDon’t believe the fairy-tale mythology that sports promote by Domonique FoxworthWill my 2-year-old nephew end up like Michael Brown? by Wendi Thomas Editor’s note: Tuesday was opening day at The Undefeated, a new ESPN website that explores the intersections of race, sports and culture. In an introductory letter, Kevin Merida, its editor-in-chief, says the site won’t shrink from covering challenging subjects with a mix of original reporting, innovative storytelling, provocative commentary, must-see video, narratives and investigations. At FiveThirtyEight, we’re so excited at having a new sibling that we’ve been running several of The Undefeated’s articles on our site this week — including the one that follows here — and we have big plans for partnerships in the future. read more

How USCs Upset Of SMU Rattled The East Region

5Virginia00+100 1Villanova00+1+10 SEEDTEAMSWEET 16ELITE 8FINAL 4CHAMP.WIN Unsurprisingly, the changes in odds are mostly concentrated in SMU’s sector of the bracket. Baylor’s path became far easier with SMU out of the way (our model considered that Round of 32 game a virtual toss-up), and even Duke saw a slight increase in its probability of advancing deep into the tournament.The way this largely upset-free tournament has been going so far, those changes count for some of the most movement we’ve seen, and they show just how much impact the loss of one dark horse (or is it one dark Mustang?) can have at this stage of the tourney.Check out our March Madness predictions. 11USC+18+4+100 4Florida000+10 The NCAA tournament started with one of the chalkiest opening days in NCAA tournament history, and Friday wasn’t looking very different: better-seeded teams won the first five games of the day, bringing their record to 19-2 going into the late afternoon on the east coast. But what was shaping up to be one of the most boring opening rounds ever received some much-needed surprise when University of Southern California upset SMU on Friday afternoon, knocking out what the computer power ratings considered one of the tournament’s most tempting dark-horse picks.Despite being seeded sixth in the stacked East region, SMU was a trendy choice to go to the Sweet 16 — or beyond. After going 27-4 in the regular season and winning the American Athletic tournament, SMU was the 11th-best team in the country according to Ken Pomeroy’s ratings, and one of only 15 schools to rank among the top 30 in both offensive and defensive efficiency.But against Southern Cal, SMU’s shooting efficiency and rebounding cratered. Now, with one SMU out of the mix, the landscape of the East region — the most difficult quadrant of the tournament — has been altered. CHANGE IN ODDS OF REACHING… Changes caused by SMU losing to Southern California on Mar. 17.Source: ESPN The ripple effects of SMU’s loss in the East region 3Baylor+30+10+3+1+1 2Duke0+4+1+10 10Marquette0+1000 read more

Bryce Harper Is Not Mike Trout Good Thing The Phillies Dont Need

CJ.T. Realmuto4.0–5.8– LFAndrew McCutchen2.4–4.2– * A player’s established level of WAR is based on a weighted average of his WAR the previous three seasons.Stats as of May 6, 2019.Sources: Baseball-Reference.com, FanGraphs.com PosPlayerEstablishedLevel*Actual RFBryce Harper3.1–3.0– Bryce Harper’s first couple of weeks in a Philadelphia Phillies uniform could scarcely have gone better. Harper introduced himself to his new team — and its infamously passionate fan base — with a .333 average, four home runs and a 1.299 on-base plus slugging in his first 10 games of 2019. Along with such pro-Philly acts as donning Phanatic cleats and ringing the bell at a Sixers game, it was a great first impression for Harper to make after inking what is now the second-richest contract in baseball history.But just like he did last season, Harper has followed up that red-hot start with an ice-cold slump. Since April 10, Harper is hitting .187 with a .632 OPS, including a .617 OPS in the past two weeks and a .477 mark in the past seven days. And despite all of his attempts to endear himself to teammates and fans, he’s already been criticized by Phillies pitcher Jake Arrieta for getting himself ejected from a game, and he was booed at Citizens Bank Park last week.Harper is a streaky player, and he’ll break out of this stretch soon enough. More importantly, the Phillies haven’t suffered too much despite Harper’s issues. The team is still .500 since April 10, it still leads the NL East, and our projections call for it to finish with the NL’s fifth-best record. Harper hasn’t remotely been the Phillies’ best player; he hasn’t even been the team’s best offseason acquisition. According to wins above replacement,1Averaging together the versions from Baseball-Reference.com and FanGraphs. Philly has gotten far more out of new catcher J.T. Realmuto, left fielder Andrew McCutchen and shortstop Jean Segura than it has out of Harper so far. Harper was merely one of the Phillies’ top pickupsAmong top four offseason pickups for the Philadelphia Phillies, preseason established* and actual wins above replacement in 2019 WAR per 162 games SSJean Segura3.9–3.8– That may not last, but it was always going to be much closer to the case than you might expect from the breathless coverage Harper’s free agency received this winter. Harper is not Mike Trout; a few of the fellow newcomers listed above actually had more WAR last season than Harper did. He is a piece of Philly’s potential postseason puzzle — perhaps even the most important one — but he’s just one of multiple talented pieces.Even so, the Phillies should be encouraged that Harper’s extremely poor defensive metrics — the single biggest drag on his WAR last year — have, predictably, reverted toward his pre-2018 form. According to an average of the fielding values found at Baseball-Reference.com and FanGraphs, Harper has been an average outfielder in the early going this season, albeit with some disagreement between the two sources.2Just like last season, Baseball-Reference is lower this year on Harper’s defense than FanGraphs is. The reality is that Harper is probably a below-average defensive outfielder — but nowhere near as bad as some of his 2018 numbers made him out to be.So once Harper’s hitting numbers start ticking up again — his batted-ball metrics are better than his stats would indicate, and his exit velocity ranks among the top quarter of MLB hitters — he’ll quickly rise up in the Phillies’ WAR pecking order. It’s concerning that Harper’s strikeout-to-walk ratio is his worst since 2014, but FanGraphs still projects him to put up the majors’ sixth-best OPS over the rest of the season. The boos will turn into cheers before long.Of course, Philly fans expecting Trout-like production from Harper will still inevitably be disappointed (and maybe the free-agency hype did drive expectations in that direction). A more reasonable outlook would have expected Harper to be one of the driving forces behind the Phillies’ improvement — just not the sole one. Given that the rest of the team has played pretty well despite Harper’s up-and-down start, Philadelphia’s postseason aspirations should be stronger than ever when he heats up again.Check out our latest MLB predictions. read more

Anchoring the Buckeye defense OSU seeks depth at linebacker

While Penn State is more affably known as “Linebacker U,” OSU seems to produce All-Americans annually at the position.  Last season, OSU had to replace all-everything linebacker James Laurinaitis and longtime starter Marcus Freeman. They didn’t miss a beat, however, as Brian Rolle and Austin Spitler were productive in their starting roles.  With Spitler gone, the Buckeyes are looking for a replacement to match his production. “We’re going to play the best three linebackers,” said Luke Fickell, linebacker coach.“We’ve got a couple of older guys in Homan and Rolle who have played a lot but we’re really looking to see what the young guys can do.” OSU has several young players eager to fill the void, but it looks like it could finally be Etienne Sabino’s time. Sabino, a blue-chip prospect from Florida, might have been the most-heralded recruit in the 2008 class other than Terrelle Pryor. His size, speed and athleticism made him arguably one of the top linebacker prospects in the country. Some expected Sabino to have an immediate impact, while others looked for him to be a starter last season when OSU replaced two seniors.  It wasn’t Sabino’s extraordinary physical gifts that were holding him back, Fickell said.  “You just see him a little more confident, a little bit more of a reacting guy and attacking,” Fickell said. “In the past, he has been a cerebral guy who wants to know everything and sometimes in this sport you can’t know everything. You just have to fly and attack and react on the run.”  “Sometimes we try to study guys and how they learn, and those kind of guys who want more info just take that extra year to process it,” Fickell said, “but when they are ready to go, they’ll be good to go usually.”  Rolle said that he has always known Sabino had extraordinary talent, but at times played too mechanically or like a robot, which held him back. He said Sabino is doing a good job of playing more naturally and is preparing to make his presence known.  “He’s such a young kid,” Fickell said. “I know he is going to be a junior, but he is only 19 years old, and you would like to have some more time with him. He is really coming along and I think this is his best spring so far.” Behind the likely starters of Homan, Rolle and Sabino, the Buckeyes are still trying to find the right players who will be able to contribute.  Andrew Sweat was another highly touted recruit from 2008 who should be ready to get playing time come September. Right now, however, Sweat is still working his way back from ACL surgery. “Andrew is a guy [who thinks he is ready to roll],” Fickell said. “He is only five-and-a-half months out of ACL surgery and he is the guy we are expecting a lot from. If he was in there it would be interesting to see who our best three guys were. He is probably a month away but he thinks he is ready to go, and the other day he jumped in there and went full go.” Fickell said he would like to have as many as nine guys at linebacker who could take turns playing, and stressed the importance of having more capable players than just the three starters.  Along with Sweat, younger players such as Storm Klein, Dorian Bell, Jonathan Newsome and incoming recruits Scott McVey and Jamel Turner could add depth.  “You would like to have six guys who can play,” Fickell said. “Would I be comfortable with some of those freshman guys on the field right now? Probably not real comfortable, but how will we know until we do it? With the jersey scrimmage and the spring game and fall camp, that is when we can really get to evaluate and see what they can do.” If there is one position the Ohio State Buckeyes are known for, it could very well be linebacker. read more

Buckeye brainteasers Ohio State vs Florida

For a 12th consecutive year, the Ohio State football team is heading to a bowl game. In Luke Fickell’s final game as head coach, OSU will take on the University of Florida in the Gator Bowl Jan. 2. Here’s a look at what the Buckeyes can expect in Jacksonville, Fla. What will new OSU head coach Urban Meyer’s role be in helping prepare OSU for the Gator Bowl? Meyer said Dec. 11 that he would not travel with the Buckeyes to Florida, but that doesn’t mean he wasn’t helping prepare the team before it departed. During a Dec. 4 conference call, Fickell was vague about whether Meyer would help the Buckeyes prepare for Florida, saying he would continue to focus on the coaches currently leading OSU. “I couldn’t tell you exactly how the whole situation is going to work,” Fickell said. “I don’t know that I would sit there and explain it to anybody other than our team and coaches anyway.” Fickell didn’t dismiss the idea that Meyer would assist the OSU players and the current coaches, so one might think it is likely he’ll have some level of input on the game plan. After all, Meyer recruited the majority of the players on Florida’s roster and is barely a year removed from coaching his former team. One could argue that no person outside of Florida’s current staff knows the Gators better than Meyer. What Florida players could pose a threat to OSU’s defense? The Florida offense has averaged 25.6 points per game this season which is ranked 71st nationally. Quarterback John Brantley came into Florida as a highly touted recruit and was expected to replace former Gator legend Tim Tebow, but has struggled at times moving into the offense. He’s thrown 1,912 yards, 10 touchdowns and six interceptions on the season. The strength of the UF offensive attack is its speedy running backs Chris Rainey and Jeff Demps. Both backs are under 5 feet 9 inches, but it’s the running backs’ agility and speed that make them a threat. The Gators try to get the ball to Rainey and Demps on the edge and aren’t afraid to utilize the two in the passing game. Between the two of them, they have combined for 1,329 rushing yards and eight touchdowns. OSU defensive coordinator Jim Heacock said he’s very aware of Florida’s fast running back tandem. “They have speed in the backfield,” Heacock said. “They changed to a pro-style offense this year and I think it’s been good for them. I think they have a little more power and they are a little more physical.” Can the Buckeyes keep up with Florida’s speed? When Meyer was head coach at Florida, the Gators developed a reputation for speed. It gave Florida a multitude of options on offense and a swarming mentality on defense. OSU witnessed the danger of Florida’s speed first hand in 2007, when the Gators beat the Buckeyes, 41-14, in the BCS National Championship Game. Will Muschamp took over as Florida’s head coach and switched the offense to more of a pro-style attack, but many of the speedy players Meyer recruited are still on the roster. “You hope we can keep up with their speed,” Heacock said. “You never know until you get out in the game and see how we’re playing. I think we have the potential when we are moving fast and playing fast that we can match up. A lot of it has to do with attitude and the approach you take to the game.” But, the Buckeye players believe they have enough speed of their own to matchup with the Gators. “I think we match up (to Florida’s speed) pretty well,” freshman linebacker Ryan Shazier said. “People may overlook us just because we’re in the Big Ten and they don’t think we are fast. But I think we have just as much speed.” Can the Buckeyes put a happy ending on the turbulent year? The OSU football team has been through a lot this season on and off the field. Scandals, suspensions and six losses have made this year one that many Buckeye fans would like to forget. For the first time since 2004, OSU won’t be playing in a BCS bowl, but the Buckeye players still say they have a lot to play for. “It would mean a lot to win this game,” senior linebacker Tyler Moeller said. “You always want to finish on top. It would give the team great morale heading into next year. And for me personally, and especially the seniors, it would be great to go out with a win in the last game.” Expect the Buckeyes to do just that. A Buckeye defense that’s almost back to full health and maturing freshman quarterback Braxton Miller will lead the Buckeyes to a close victory over the Gators. Final score prediction: OSU 31, Florida 27 read more

Recruitment company employing private investigators to probe British troops in Iraq given

first_imgMike Penning, the armed forces minister, said Red Snapper had been paid £20.8 million since winning the contract to provide staff for the Iraq Historic Allegations Team (Ihat) in 2013 The recruitment company that employs private investigators to probe the conduct of British troops in Iraq has been received more than £20 million in taxpayers money, it can be disclosed.Ministers revealed the huge sums paid to Red Snapper Recruitment amid growing calls for the inquiry into alleged historic abuse be shut down.Mike Penning, the armed forces minister, said in a parliamentary written answer that Red Snapper had been paid £20.8 million since winning the contract to provide staff for the Iraq Historic Allegations Team (Ihat) in 2013.The scale of the payments has appalled MPs calling for Ihat to be closed down. Ihat is investigating almost 1,500 cases of alleged abuse in Iraq Sir Henry Bellingham, Conservative MP for North West Norfolk who asked the parliamentary question, said he was “staggered, flabbergasted and appalled” by the amount.“It seems to me that the sole purpose of this recruitment drive is to find people who want to go out and destroy the lives of our brave veterans,” said Sir Henry, “All of the alleged crimes have already been fully investigated and what the Iraq Historic Allegations Team and Red Snapper are doing completely breaches our basic laws of natural justice. “I cannot think of another country in the world that would treat its veterans in this way.”Johnny Mercer, Conservative MP and chairman of a parliamentary inquiry into the treatment of troops under Ihat investigation, said: “Ihat has been a spectacular failure. It has failed to complete its core function of prosecuting those who have broken the law; it has taken a devastating toll in the – at times unlawful – pursuit of those who have done no wrong; and it is an appalling waste of public money.” Ihat is investigating almost 1,500 cases of alleged abuse in IraqCredit: Sipa Press / Rex Featurescenter_img Red Snapper supplies 127 investigators, many of them retired police officers on full pay, to Ihat. The company’s founders – Martin Jerrold and his wife Helen – have paid themselves hundreds of thousands of pounds in dividends since winning the Ihat contract in 2013 after a bidding process. Mr Jerrold insists the contract returns a small profit of three percent and that the company has other successful contracts besides Ihat.The contract is worth just under £5 million a year – equivalent to about 12 per cent of Red Snapper’s total turnover. It is not clear why Red Snapper has received £20.8 million since 2013 but it is possible it has received extra payments for processing travel costs and expenses on which it makes no profit.Ihat is investigating almost 1,500 cases of alleged abuse in Iraq. Since it was set up in 2010, no soldier has been prosecuted as a result of an Ihat investigation. Mike Penning, the armed forces minister, said Red Snapper had been paid £20.8 million since winning the contract to provide staff for the Iraq Historic Allegations Team (Ihat) in 2013Credit:Eddie Mulholland Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

Hi Im Meghan Ms Markle introduces herself on first royal outing with

first_imgHe said Prince Harry told him he was “delighted to be here”, adding “Look at the number of people here, isn’t it great!” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. One group of mothers had brought five small children for their first encounter with royalty, with Claire Saribi saying they could not pass up the opportunity to show them history in action.Her son Idris, one, had been practising saying “congratulations” ahead of the walkabout, while Zoë and Emilia, who are three and friends from ballet class, made a card covered in star-shaped stickers. Prince Harry and Meghan Markle arriving in NottinghamCredit:Stephen Lock / i-Images Prince Harry and Meghan Markle visited Nottingham in their first set of engagements together since announcing their engagement Barbara Miller, 63, from Nottingham, said: “She said thank you very much for braving the cold.“I said ‘can we have a selfie?’. She said ‘we’re not allowed to do selfies’.“She was so pleasant, she was lovely. She said to my husband ‘your hands are really cold’.”Cori Burns, 80 from Clifton, said Meghan pointed out her home state of California is warmer than the UK.Cori said: “I used to live in California so I asked her where she was from and she said it’s warmer over there than here.”The walkabout also gave Ms Markle and Prince Harry to indulge their love of dogs, with the Prince asking one named Gertie whether he was getting a Christmas stocking. Prince Harry and Meghan Markle arriving in Nottingham Prince Harry (C) greets wellwishersCredit:OLI SCARFF/AFP/Getty Images Prince Harry and his fiancee US actress Meghan Markle are greeted as they arrive to attend a Terrence Higgins Trust World AIDS Day charity fair Credit:ADRIAN DENNIS/AFP/Getty Images Ann McGuire, who brought her nearly-three-year-old son Leo with her, said Ms Markle bent down to speak to the toddler, telling him he was “so brave” to come out in the cold.”She reached out again and grabbed my hand and said I’m so glad you braved it to stand in the cold,” she said. “She’s such a natural.” Meghan, 36, showed that she is already learning the royal rules when it comes to official visits, politely declining to pose for a selfie, telling one couple: “We’re not allowed.” Claire Kensall brought a card made by her daughter Ruby, seven, congratulating them on their engagement and saying: “I can’t wait to see your wedding.” Katie Shaw, 22, was visibly excited by her encounter with future Royalty,  after Ms Markle came to shake her hand and appeared deep in conversation.”They’re very down to earth even though they’re royal,” she said. “But it’s all about Suits. We really like Suits and she told us there are going to be two more series.”Frank Shelton, 79, missed out on a one-on-one with the Prince and Ms Markle despite bringing his eight-year-old barn owl Kim along for the day, but remained enthusiastic about the encounter.”This is something very different,” he said. “I thought: Harry’s bringing his bird so I brought mine.”center_img Prince Harry (C) greets wellwishers Her first official gift came from Ian Curryer, chief executive of Nottingham City Council, who gave her and the Prince a silver pin in the shape of Robin Hood with a bow and arrow, in honour of what they had done for the local area. Meghan Markle proved she is already well-versed in the working life of the Royal Family, as she undertook her first walkabout and was proclaimed a natural.Ms Markle spent around 25 minutes meeting the crowds in Nottingham with Prince Harry, charming members of the public as she introduced herself with a cheery “Hi, I’m Meghan.””I’m so happy,” she said at one point. “It’s just such a thrill to be here.”Members of the public had been waiting since  6am  to meet the newly-engaged couple, waiting in the freezing cold with gifts including bunches of flowers, Haribo – Harry’s favourite sweet – and homemade cards.Ms Markle, who is undertaking her first official Royal engagement in Nottingham today, made a beeline for children, dogs, and seemed thrilled to meet the many American students who had turned out to see her.Accepting congratulations from hundreds of wellwishers, she showed her engagement ring to interested admirers who asked and smiled at the many compliments about Prince Harry. Micaela Lueders, 20, who is from California, said the former actress had recognised her accent and told her: “Its so lovely to meet a fellow Californian, I’m so excited to be here.”She was wondering if I was staying here and whether I’m enjoying it. It was really great. She seemed very natural.”She’s very warm. I bet she was terribly nervous but she didn’t show it.”Waving to people in the windows above the narrow street, Ms Markle walked down a line asking people their names, where they are from and endearingly introducing herself by name in case they were not sure who she was. Prince Harry and his fiancee Meghan Markle Prince Harry and his fiancee Meghan MarkleCredit:REUTERS/Eddie Keogh Margo Heyhurst, from Cambridge, said: “Her clothes, her demeanour, everything about her.“They’re so in love, I loved all the things they said in their interview.“We need magic at the moment. There should be a public holiday for the wedding.”While most people spent time speaking about the Royal family, others had more important concerns.Mandy Koehler, 19 from Nebraska, who is studying in Nottingham, said: “I wanted to ask Prince Harry his favourite colour. He said it was blue, but then changed his mind to purple.” “Harry said he was really pleased, and thanked her,” she added.Frieda, 87, from Nottingham, recalled seeing the Queen in the city when she was Princess Elizabeth around 1950, wanting to pass her best wishes to Prince Harry.”She was lovely,” she said of Meghan. “She said she was so pleased to be here. I told her you’re lovely – she’s very beautiful.”Harry said he loved my plaits.” Prince Harry and Meghan Markle visited Nottingham in their first set of engagements together since announcing their engagementCredit:OLI SCARFF/AFP/Getty Images Prince Harry and his fiancee US actress Meghan Markle are greeted as they arrive to attend a Terrence Higgins Trust World AIDS Day charity fair  Ms Markle crouched down to meet them and ask how old they were, and thank them for the card. Helena Bottomly, who gave a bag of Haribo to Meghan to pass to her fiance, stood with three friends who had brought red and white roses, said: “She was really pleased with the presents. We congratulated her.”Asked for their assessment of Ms Markle, the friends said: “She’s a little gem.”last_img read more

Save the Children boss quit over unsuitable and thoughtless texts to female

first_imgPenny Mordaunt, International Development Secretary Baroness Stowell has been chosen by the Government to lead the Charity Commission The former chief executive of Save the Children resigned after he admitted making “unsuitable and thoughtless” comments to three young female members of staff, it emerged on Tuesday.Justin Forsyth, who is now deputy executive director at Unicef, “apologised unreservedly” to the women after sending them text messages commenting on how they looked and what they were wearing.It represents the latest scandal facing the charity sector after it emerged that senior Oxfam staff paid prostitutes while working in Haiti following an earthquake in 2010.Mr Forsyth’s resignation from Save the Children came just four months after Brendan Cox, a friend of Mr Forsyth and former chief strategist at the charity, quit following separate allegations of sexual misconduct. Mr Foryth and Mr Cox worked together at Oxfam and later again as advisors to Gordon Brown in Downing Street. Mr Cox, the widower of the late Jo Cox who was murdered in 2016, admitted at the weekend that he had caused the women “hurt and offence”. Meanwhile, Save the Children admitted last night it should have conducted a further review into Mr Forsyth’s conduct and “matters should not have been left”.The women who complained about Mr Forsyth’s behaviour told the BBC he sent them a “barrage” of text messages which left them feeling deeply uncomfortable. If they did not respond he allegedly sent them emails, and if they still refused to engage they were called over by Mr Forsyth for a private “chat”. Save the Children is said to have dealt with each complaint by having a mediation process where Mr Forsyth apologised to the women involved. One of the complainants, who remained anonymous, said: “The complaints of harassment were not treated with the appropriate degree of seriousness. “It seems there was more interest in preventing the exposure of misconduct than in protecting its female employees from predatory behaviour.” Brendan Cox has apologised following allegations of sexual harassment Mr Goldring disclosed that Oxfam had given Roland van Hauwermeiren, the charity’s former director of operations in Haiti, a reference which omitted the fact he had used prostitutes. He subsequently went on to work for another charity.Ms Mordaunt said: “They did not provide a full report to the Charity Commission, they did not provide a full report to their donors, they did not provide a full report to prosecutors. In my view they misled, quite possibly deliberately.” Mark Goldring, chief executive of Oxfam Penny Mordaunt, International Development Secretary A spokesman for Unicef, where Mr Forsyth now works, said: “We are aware of media reports related to past complaints against Justin Forsyth about events that occurred before he joined UNICEF.  We welcome Mr Forsyth’s decision to come forward and acknowledge past mistakes. We are discussing this matter with Mr Forsyth and his former employer so we can take appropriate action.”The charitable sector has come under fire since it emerged that Oxfam allowed aid workers in Haiti to resign after it emerged they had been using prostitutes. Brendan Cox has apologised following allegations of sexual harassment Save the Children admitted on Tuesday that it dealt with 193 child protection and 35 sexual harassment cases last year, which led to 30 dismissals. Penny Mordaunt, the International Development Secretary, accused Oxfam executives of “betraying the public” and said they may have deliberately misled charity regulators and the authorities.She also warned that Britain could withdraw funding for the United Nations unless it stops exploitation and abuse. Oxfam revealed on Tuesday it had received 26 new allegations of sexual misconduct and 7,000 donors have cancelled their subscriptions in the fortnight since the Haiti sex scandal emerged.A total of 16 alleged incidents took place in countries where Oxfam ran aid operations, seven in high street charity shops in the UK and three from “other UK-based divisions”. “Other women tell you to watch out for certain senior people. You start to hear rumours about some of the directors but of course, until it happens to you, which it did, you don’t really appreciate how hard it is to deal with.”One former senior staff member added: “The centre of this crisis was not in Haiti or in Chad, it was here in London and it went all the way to the top.”In a statement last night Mr Forsyth said: “I made some personal mistakes during my time at Save the Children. “I recognise that on a few occasions I had unsuitable and thoughtless conversations with colleagues which I now know caused offence and hurt. “When this was brought to my attention on two separate occasions I apologised unreservedly to the three colleagues involved and my apologies were accepted and I thought the issue was closed many years ago.” Neither Mr Forsyth nor Mr Cox were subject to a formal discplinary hearing. Save the Children said on Tuesday night that trustees had carried out two internal investigations into the complaints against Mr Forsyth in 2011 and 2015. A spokesperson for Save the Children said: “The review will commence by the end of this week and report in June 2018. The final report will be published, shared with the Charity Commission and made available to Government and every single member of staff.”We apologise for any pain these matters have caused and sincerely hope that the complainants feel able to help us with the review in the coming weeks. This is so that we can better support our skilled and highly valued staff as they help change the lives of millions of children around the world every day.” Mark Goldring, chief executive of Oxfam Baroness Stowell has been chosen by the Government to lead the Charity Commission The new disclosures came as MPs blocked the appointment of the Government’s candidate to head the Charity Commission, questioning her lack of experience in the charity section. Baroness Stowell of Beeston, a Tory peer, struggled to answer questions posed to her by the Commons digital, culture, media and sport committee yesterday. She had been due to replace William Shawcross, who is due to complete his five-year term on Friday. It will now be up to Matt Hancock, the Culture Secretary, to decide whether to overrule the committee and confirm her appointment, or back down and seek an alternative candidate.  Another told the BBC: “It was my dream to work for an organisation like Save the Children but the longer you are there the more you are exposed to some of their bravado and that’s both at head office and in the field. The cases range from 1995 to the present. Mark Goldring, the chief executive at Oxfam GB, apologised on Tuesday to the committee for the actions of some Oxfam staff who sexually exploited young Haitian woman and for an interview last week in which he appeared to downplay the gravity of the scandal.  He said he had been stressed when he claimed the “ferocity” of the attacks on Oxfam made it seem as if staff had “murdered babies in their cots”. He also apologised for saying he made the comments after six nights without sleep.He said: “I repeat Oxfam’s broader apology and my personal apology. I am sorry, we are sorry, for the damage Oxfam has done both to the people of Haiti but also to wider efforts for aid and development by possibly undermining public support.”As well as donors who have cancelled their subscriptions, Mr Goldring also disclosed that corporate sponsors are considering whether to continue giving Oxfam money.Pauline Latham, a Tory member of the committee, questioned whether he was the “right person for the job” after he failed to look into allegations that staff had paid prostitutes in Haiti when he was appointed in 2013.She said some Oxfam staff had treated women and girls in Haiti if they were “trinkets and you can pay for them”. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

Cold war extends to private schools as number of Russian children sent

Ms Moody-Stuart said that while the Russian families who send their children to private schools in the UK tend to be extremely wealthy, the Chinese families tend to be more middle class. “Many of the Chinese students do not speak English. But they are very bright, they work very hard, they’re very ambitious,” she said.  The ISC census also showed that private school fees have risen by more than the rate of inflation, with families now paying out more than £5,700 a term on average.  Average fees have risen by 3.4 per cent compared to last year, according to the Independent Schools Council’s (ISC) latest annual census, while inflation stands at 2.5 per cent (CPI).The ISC said this was the lowest rise since 1994, adding that many pupils who attend its schools receive financial assistance. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Diplomatic relations between Russia and the West have taken a turn for the worse in recent years.Now it seems that the Cold War has now extended to private schools, as the number of Russian children sent to British schools has almost halved over the past two years.The number of Russian students whose parents live overseas has been steadily growing since 2007 but has dropped sharply over the past two years, according to the Independent School Council’s (ISC) annual census.In 2015, there were 2,795 Russian pupils at the UK’s private schools, but this has now dropped to 1,699, the latest figures show. Meanwhile, the number of Chinese students attending fee-paying schools has soared in recent years.Grace Moody-Stuart, director of Good Schools Guide education consultants, said that wealthy Russian families have historically been attracted to British boarding schools for the prestige associated with an all-rounded education.  “If they live overseas they will be sending their children to prestigious British boarding schools. They want the sport, the art, and everything that is excellent about that education,” she said.”It is also a chance for children to immerse themselves in the English language, and to have access to top universities whether in the UK, the US or Canada.”   read more

Leading piano competitions ban teachers from jury over rigging fears

“All the members of the jury – one or two of them may have come across one or two of the competitors in a masterclass but that’s a different ball game to having someone who is a regular pupil,” he told the Daily Telegraph. “Our rules – which have been set for 50 years – are very clear about that. If there is a conflict of interest that jury member is not allowed to vote for anybody that is a pupil.”He added that the Leeds competition has “always had a very good reputation for its artistic integrity”. “I would not feel comfortable sitting in a jury – which has happened to me in the past – with people performing whose teachers are on the jury. Even if those jury members are absolutely completely honourable, it is saying something to the outside world which I feel uncomfortable with. “It may well be that that person who wins is the best person but it is open to misinterpretation and that is what we want to avoid.”He added that the competition was looking at making the judging entirely transparent by making it clear who voted for who.  The Leeds International Piano Competition Piano competitions might not be an obvious hotbed of corruption. But the industry has been dogged by rumours that teachers are fixing contests by voting for their own pupils. Now one of the UK’s leading events is so concerned about the issue that they have barred teachers from their jury.The Leeds International Piano Competition is pushing for transparency amid concerns that the music competitions, which can launch a young artist’s career, are widely seen as rigged in favour of competitors whose mentor is on the jury. One of its new directors said he has in the past judged a prize alongside teachers whose proteges were among the hopefuls.  Adam Gatehouse, a former BBC radio boss, said the experience made him feel “uncomfortable”, and has prompted a decision alongside his co-director, leading pianist Paul Lewis to limit its judging panel to renowned performers. “There’s no international performer worth their salt who doesn’t also give masterclasses or come into contact with young artists but that is different from actually being a teacher who spends all their time actually just teaching. “That’s an area which I personally also felt a little uncomfortable about purely because inevitably there would be conflicts of interest.  The Leeds International Piano Competition has  ‘always had a very good reputation for its artistic integrity’ Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Mr Gatehouse, a main conductor for the Ballet Rambert before becoming live music editor for BBC Radio 3, became artistic director of the competition in 2015, alongside classical pianist Paul Lewis. Mr Lewis has previously said that the Leeds competition under his supervision will be “as transparent as humanly possible”. “Our jury, rather than consisting principally of full-time teachers, will be performer-led,” he said in a 2016 blog post. He added that the competition aimed to take the “long-term wellbeing” of the young winners into consideration, amid concerns that they might struggle to cope with their newfound fame. The competition, set to be held in September this year, will offer prizes including concerts and recording opportunities with Radio 3 and a partnership with arts management company Askonas Holt. The pair took over from the competition’s founder Dame Fanny Waterman, who stepped down at the age of 95 having founded it in 1961.  Juries will be made up of performers Juries will be made up of performers read more

Two men arrested after shooting in Wolverhampton which left sixyearold boy injured

A 24-year-old man and 17-year-old boy have been arrested on suspicion of wounding after a six-year-old boy was injured in a shooting.Officers from West Midlands Police believe a group of men fired shots at a house in Ashbourne Road in the Eastfield area of Wolverhampton at around 4pm on Friday.The injured boy, who was in the property at the time, has an injured back and remains in hospital in a stable condition.The arrested men remain in custody, West Midlands Police said.Detective Inspector Rod Rose said: “These arrests are a significant step forward in our investigation which continues at pace. Forensic officers examine the scene for evidence Forensic officers examine the scene for evidenceCredit:Jamie Ricketts/Caters News Agency Police have increased patrols and brought in extra officers following the incident.Anyone with information is asked to call police on 101 or Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555111. “It’s a shocking incident where someone has opened fire with a shotgun in broad daylight.”The motive of this attack remains unclear and we’re working hard to try and understand what happened earlier today.” Police at the scene in Wolverhampton Police at the scene in WolverhamptonCredit:Matthew Cooper /PA Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

Babies living with abusive parents under 24hour CCTV as Childrens Commissioner calls

Anne Longfield OBE, the Children's Commissioner. Babies are living with abusive parents under 24-hour CCTV surveillance, The Telegraph can reveal, as the Children’s Commissioner calls for a review into the ‘Big Brother-style’ accommodation.Local authorities are spending millions-of-pounds each year housing parents suspected of being unfit to care for their children by housing them in residential family assessment centres.Councils and the courts can allocate a family to the centres – which are monitored with 24-hour CCTV – when there are serious concerns regarding parenting skills. They help provide evidence of competence and can play an important role in making difficult long term decisions regarding vulnerable children.However “disturbing” cases – which have remained unreported until now – where children have been physically injured and sexually abused while living in the units have prompted the Children’s Commissioner to call for a review into the controversial scheme. Anne Longfield OBE told The Telegraph that a review of the centres was needed after this newspaper brought a “shocking” case to her attention in which an eight-month-old baby boy was sexually abused by his mother during her elongated stay at the centre.She told this newspaper: “The details of this shocking case do beg questions. Where these Centres provide early parental support, I have heard good things, but the nature of these “assessments” both as a process, and how they practically work, combined with the length of stay and the costs involved suggest a valid case for reviewing how they continue in future.”   Anne Longfield OBE, the Children’s Commissioner.Credit:Jeff Gilbert /Jeff Gilbert  Ms Jellings added that given the high- profile criticism of the alleged ease with which local authorities remove children, one has to wonder whether fear of such criticism was a factor at play in this case.  “Resources must be allocated on a strictly needs and merits basis, and not according to politics or fear of negative PR” she said.Sophie Humphreys OBE, a child protection expert and founder of the national organisation Pause aimed at reducing the number of children going into care said that Baby L’s case would “at best only confirm what is already known by the local authority”. “A review of the whole notion of residential parenting assessment to understand what works and what does not would be of significant benefit”.The Local Government Association said that matters involving the centres, which are monitored by Ofsted, are up to individual councils.An Ofsted spokeswoman said: “Ofsted inspects residential family centres at least once every three years in line with government requirements. We consider any serious incidents as part of our risk assessment and will take action where we are concerned for children’s safety. Such placements are overseen by the court, with day to day supervision provided by the unit and regular visits from the local authority.”A Department for Education spokesman added: “No child should suffer abuse and it is important that we learn lessons from cases like this to ensure vulnerable children are safeguarded. We have set up new systems for local reviews to ensure lessons are learnt and best practice is shared.“We have also set up the National Child Safeguarding Practice Review Panel who review the most serious or complex cases. The independent panel has launched its first review into criminal exploitation which will consider where learning can be shared nationally, and make sure our most vulnerable children are protected.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Show more Questions have been raised as to why Baby L stayed in the care of his parents for so long when he was clearly at risk of harm and sexual abuse and while the family struggled to maintain a working relationship with the local authority and accept their advice. Credit:./. Furthermore, despite repeatedly being told that they should not have contact with the grandfather – who is currently in prison – not only did Baby L’s parents allow contact but the mother “encouraged contact between the grandfather and the children,” Judge Greensmith said. According to the latest publicly-available Department for Education figures, in 2014, the average cost of a 12-week placement in an assessment centre – which is the length of the average stay – was around £16,000. Yet Baby L’s family stayed in their centre for 22 weeks, which would roughly amount to more than £50,000. Jacqueline Fitzgerald, Partner and Head of Family at Wilsons Solicitors LLP, said the case represents an “abject failure” on behalf of the local authority which “failed to prioritise the needs of the children over adults”.“It’s almost like political correctness gone mad,” she said. “There’s such a willingness to keep families together but there’s nobody shouting out for the children.”She said that when the centres work well they are beneficial to families. However, she added that she has been made aware of cases where children have been injured, despite the parents “supposedly being monitored” and said that the centres have “the potential for Big Brother-style monitoring of families”. Jo-Anna Jellings, Associate at JMW Solicitors LLP and a specialist children lawyer, said that Baby L’s case will raise further concern at a time when the conduct of local authorities in care and adoption proceedings is under increased scrutiny, amid an ongoing funding crisis.She added that there is a “delicate and challenging balancing act” to be undertaken between ensuring that children can be raised with their families and ensuring no unnecessary intervention from the state – and the absolute need to protect vulnerable children from serious harm“On the face of it, it seems hard to see how those considerations were correctly balanced in Baby L’s case,” she said, adding that assessment centres, such as the ones used in his case are amongst some of the most expensive forms of intervention”.  Her calls echo those of family lawyers who accuse councils of putting the safety and welfare of children at risk in order to avoid “negative PR” for splitting up families. They also claim that CCTV is not constantly monitored which can lead to children being harmed.In 2013 local authorities were given clear guidance by the Supreme Court which stated that removing children from their parents must be a last resort. The case, Re B, became known as the ‘nothing else will do’ case in family-law circles, on account of the fact it made clear that removal was only justified when there was no less draconian option available.It was generally accepted within the profession that the case had raised the bar for the removal of children from their families. However family lawyers now believe this landmark case has sparked an epidemic of “political correctness” among councils fearful of separating children from their parents – even when they need to be for their own safety.Questions have been raised as to why Baby L stayed in the care of his parents for so long when he was clearly at risk of harm and sexual abuse and while the family struggled to maintain a working relationship with the local authority and accept their advice.The case was heard earlier this year at the Family Court in the north of England before His Honour Judge Greensmith where he ruled that Baby L should be raised either in foster care or be placed for adoption. The judge had to determine whether Baby L’s parents were likely to expose him to harm either from his grandfather – who had been convicted of sexually abusing his siblings – or others. However, he found that during the family’s stay in the centre, Baby L’s mother had sexually abused him as she “failed to take proper measures to prevent [him] being exposed to sexual activity”. In his ruling it emerged that CCTV cameras in the family assessment centre had recorded her repeatedly masturbating while he was in the room, and while holding him. Questions have been raised as to why Baby L stayed in the care of his parents for so long when he was clearly at risk of harm and sexual abuse and while the family struggled to maintain a working relationship with the local authority and accept their advice. read more

Wisroc community gets ICT hub

The Wisroc community at Wismar, Linden, Region 10 (Upper Demerara-Berbice) is one of the most recent to benefit from an Information Communication Technology hub. Located at the Stacy Walters Library, this newest hub is equipped with 10 laptop computers and Internet access.The new ICT hub at Wisroc, LindenAccording to Senior Social Management Officer of the National Data Management Authority, Jasmaine Payne, the main aim of the initiative is to ensure online access to Government services.“One of our main missions is to ensure that we bring Government services online; and so the ITC hubs that we have across the country — this will be the 128th across the country — will help to first give access to poor, hinterland and remote communities… “We have been working over the last several years to ensure that we bring these services to the communities, so that when we bring Government services online, they already have access,” she explained.While such hubs are usually placed in Government-owned buildings, calls have been made for collaboration with non-governmental organisations so as to take the service to more communities. Owner of the library, overseas-based Guyanese Ingrid Walters, has said she is pleased to have the hub situated at the location. The library is utilised mainly by residents of Wisroc.“I’m very pleased that the Government has stepped up and decided that they are going to do something with this building, like utilising some of the space we have here. It’s very expensive for me to keep filling this place with books. I’m overwhelmed”, she said. The hub will be managed by a committee which is expected to ensure smooth operation. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedICT Initiatives to transform Guyana in 2017 – HughesDecember 7, 2016In “latest news”Regions 1, 7 and 8 to get internet access before the end of 2018- HughesJanuary 4, 2018In “Internet”E-Governance Unit rolls out of Wi-Fi in schools; Hinterland areas to benefitNovember 17, 2015In “Business” read more

Cameco mobilises to check soil contamination

first_imgCameco reported July 20 that during a construction project it discovered uranium and evidence of other production-associated chemicals in the soil beneath its Port Hope uranium hexafluoride (UF6) conversion plant. The company said “the affected area appears to be within, and near, the perimeter walls of the UF6 plant based on the preliminary information available at this time. Ongoing subsoil investigations are expected to provide additional information. Cameco has suspended operations at the UF6 conversion plant and a thorough investigation is being conducted. The chemicals are in a contained area so public health and worker safety are not affected.”The discovery was made in an area being excavated within the building to install new equipment. Cameco and third-party experts are investigating to determine the source of the chemicals. In addition, holes are being drilled around the area and the soil and groundwater are being tested to ascertain the area affected. All regulatory authorities have been notified. Due to the nature of soil at the plant, Cameco expects the ground water flow rate, with the chemicals, to average approximately 40 to 60 m/y. The perimeter of the plant is about 70 m from the edge of the property. This provides ample time to address, contain and mitigate the affected area. Cameco has monitoring wells around the property to detect chemicals in the area. These wells are checked quarterly and reported to the regulator annually. The last scheduled samples were taken in April and did not indicate potential issues. Cameco has arranged for additional samples to be taken. Full production of UF6 will likely be suspended for a minimum of two months until Cameco has determined the source of the chemicals and developed appropriate plans. There is no cost estimate for this activity available at this time. Uranium dioxide (UO2) conversion and other activities at the site are not affected. The company says it is assessing the impact of this situation on its production forecasts and will provide a revised forecast in its second quarter report. It “plans to meet scheduled deliveries for the remainder of the year based on existing inventory.”last_img read more

Its all happening in the Nordic Region including Finlands largest mining project

first_imgLatest issue of International Mining Project News available (December 4):This week, International Mining attended the 7th Fennoscandian Exploration and Mining conference in Rovaniemi, Finland. Delegate attendance at FEM 2009, one of the largest exploration and mining conferences in Europe, exceeded all expectations. It is the seventh in a series of conferences held every second year, focusing on exploration and mining in Fennoscandia. Big news included First Quantum Minerals approving the development of the Kevitsa nickel-copper-PGM. It is one of the world’s major undeveloped sulphide nickel deposits and one of the largest mineral discoveries in Finland’s history. Mid-central Lappland is a hot area even in the winter! Also, Agnico-Eagle is finding more gold at its Kittila gold mine and Belvedere Resources announced a maiden resource estimate on its 100% owned, Hirsikangas Gold Project in western Finland. A full report on FEM will be published in a forthcoming issue of International Mining.Some of the highlights of IMPN include Xstrata Queensland, a wholly owned subsidiary of Xstrata, entering into an agreement with Zijin Mining Group in respect of Xstrata’s 19.9% stake in Indophil Resources. Under the terms of the agreement, Xstrata has agreed to sell its shareholding in Indophil to Zijin, subject to certain conditions. Indophil has also announced an agreement with Zijin with respect to a takeover offer for Indophil. Indophil’s only major asset is a 34.23% interest, with a right to acquire an additional 3.27%, in the Tampakan copper-gold project in the southern Philippines. Xstrata holds the remaining 62.5% interest in the Tampakan project which is managed by Xstrata’s affiliate company, Sagittarius Mines.The shareholders of Debswana (the Government of the Republic of Botswana and De Beers), have given the green light to proceed with a major extension project at Jwaneng, the world’s flagship diamond mine. The project, also known as Cut-8, is a key component of Debswana’s North Star strategy and is the largest ever single capital commitment in the private sector in Botswana.Construction is officially underway on Western Australia’s Mid West region’s largest resources project, the Karara iron ore project, following an official ground-breaking ceremony. Located 500 km northeast of Perth and only 225 km east of Geraldton, the Karara project is a major new integrated iron ore project being developed under a 50/50 joint venture between Australian iron ore company Gindalbie Metals and leading Chinese steel and iron ore company, Ansteel.Randgold Resources is to acquire a further 5% interest in the Tongon gold project in Côte d’Ivoire, raising its stake to 89%. Development of the Tongon mine is currently under way and it is scheduled to go into production in the fourth quarter of 2010.Kangaroo Resources has successfully completed a A$30 million capital raising for the purchase and development of a suite of advanced coal projects located in East Kalimantan, Indonesia. Fox Resources will commence the development of a base metals heap leaching operation at Radio Hill, located in the Pilbara of Western Australia.EMED Mining Public is making progress on its plans to restart the Rio Tinto mine (Proyecto Rio Tinto or PRT) in Spain. Since the last update on September 30, the Junta de Andalucia has communicated its support within the legislative framework for PRT at public forums and EMED Mining has been asked to prepare and submit all remaining plans for regulatory approval. The company (via its wholly-owned subsidiary EMED Tartessus) and the authorities have refined the approach to the permitting process.last_img read more

UXA now the global leader in direct uranium logging technology

first_imgUranium Exploration Australia (UXA) has completed the transfer of all of the assets and intellectual property of the Prompt Fission Neutron (PFN) borehole logging tool manufacturing and service business previously agreed with GeoInstruments. The purchase further strengthens UXA’s fully-owned borehole logging business, Geoscience Associated Australia, which prior to this agreement was the sole Australian licensed distributor and servicer of PFN technology. The PFN borehole logging tool is unique in that it directly measures the content of uranium in boreholes, overcoming the problem of dis-equilibrium which limits the interpretation of uranium concentrations using gamma logging tools. It is becoming increasingly used within the uranium mining and exploration industries, and played a significant role in the discoveries of two of Australia’s largest uranium deposits, the Beverley mine and Four Mile deposits in South Australia.Commenting on the deal, UXA’s Managing Director Dr Russell Penney said, “The acquisition of GII’s business cements UXA’s unique position in PFN logging services, expanding our customer base beyond Australia to incorporate North America and potentially other countries. As agreed under the terms of the agreement signed in January, UXA has now paid a total cash consideration of $1,271,380 for the intellectual property, a number of completed and partially completed PFN tools and a fully equipped borehole logging truck. UXA has retained the services of Jim Turner on an ongoing basis, to provide technical consultancy and service to US clients of the PFN logging tools. UXA has established PFN manufacturing and servicing at GAA’s workshops in Mount Barker, South Australia under the direction of Dennis Stevens, CEO of GAA.PFN tools are being extensively used in Australia and the US to establish uranium grades at a number of uranium mines and exploration projects. The technology was originally developed in the US and has been extensively improved and streamlined for day to day borehole logging application by Jim Turner and GeoInstruments Inc in the US.UXA was formed to explore for and develop uranium and associated base and precious metal deposits, focusing principally on its ground holdings in the world class uranium provinces in South Australia and Northern Territory. UXA has an exploration joint venture with RIL Australia, a subsidiary of Reliance Industries, the largest private sector company in India. In July 2009 UXA announced the discovery of uranium mineralisation in a 3,000 m long structure within granite at Crystal Creek, on its Ngalia Thrust exploration licence in the Northern Territory, with recent RC percussion drilling showing intercepts up to 3m @ 346ppm U3O8.In February 2010 UXA announced the signing of an agreement with Rey Resources to explore for sandstone-hosted uranium at Myroodah in the Canning Basin, Western Australia.Geoscience Associates Australia is a borehole geophysical logging company principally working in the uranium and coal sectors in Australia. The UXA Group owns the worldwide rights to the Prompt Fission Neutron uranium logging tool which has a unique role to play in uranium deposits with disequilibrium.last_img read more

Industrial minerals contribute 335 billion to US GDP

first_imgAs the leading international resource for fact-based, technical information about America’s mining and related industries, the Society for Mining, Metallurgy & Exploration (SME) has released a technical briefing paper addressing the economic impact the industrial minerals sector has on society. In the paper, Industrial Minerals’ Impact on the U.S. Economy, SME states industrial minerals are fundamental to the US economy, contributing $33.5 billion to the real gross domestic product (GDP) and directly employing 68,000 workers. The physical properties of industrial minerals, such as absorption, material texture and high specific gravity, allow for their use in a variety of consumer products and applications. “Although industrial minerals are prevalent in nearly all aspects of our daily lives, the general public knows very little about them,” said SME Executive Director David L. Kanagy. “They are the critical raw materials that support myriad market sectors from abrasives, drilling mud and pharmaceuticals, to synthetic fibres, plastics and paper.” American manufacturers currently rely on foreign suppliers for more than half of the minerals they use in finished productsAmerica is 100% dependent on imports for 19 minerals and more than 50% import-dependent for an additional 24 minerals – many of which are industrial mineralsAs the US economy continues to recover, manufacturing, construction and agriculture will drive demand for increased use of industrial minerals that will fuel the domestic engine of growthIndustrial minerals are responsible for $33.5 billion of the $232 billion value that mining adds to the US economy on an annual basisApproximately 68,000 workers are directly employed by the industrial minerals mining sector. To obtain a copy of this paper, go to: http://ow.ly/qtxrdlast_img read more

Clariant doubles ether amine production in Brazil to meet mining demand

first_imgClariant, the global supplier of speciality chemicals and one of the world’s leading suppliers of specialty ether amines to the mining industry, has announced the increase of the ether amines production at its Suzano, Brazil facility. Targeted specifically to meet the needs of the mining industry, Clariant says the planned expansion will allow it to meet the growing demands of customers in Brazil as well as support global customers who are also expanding mineral processing capacity.“Clariant is aiming to expand its global footprint in the mining industry, especially in Latin America where we can build on our long term experience in Brazil. This investment is in line with our strategy to focus on fast growing markets where we have a leading position”, comments Christian Kohlpaintner, Member of Clariant’s Executive Committee.“Our wide range of specialty ether amines allow our customers to upgrade lower quality ores by removing silica and other contaminants, which is crucial due to availability of high quality ore deposits being depleted globally”, said Finlay Morrison, Vice President of Clariant Mining Solutions. “The expansion doubles our global production capacity, allowing supply to keep up with growing global demand.”Ether amines are critical agents used in the mining process to beneficiate minerals such as iron ore and phosphates. Clariant’s production capacity expansion will be completed in two phases over the next 18 months. The first phase of the Suzano plant’s capacity will be completed in the third quarter of 2014. The second phase, which will double the capacity, is expected to be operational by the fourth quarter of 2015.The Suzano plant is Clariant’s largest production complex in Latin America, and it has been providing solutions for the mining industry for more than 30 years, not only meeting Brazilian market demands, but customers worldwide.last_img read more