Can Kojo Prove Prophetic against Meteors on Saturday?

first_imgNational U-23 head coach Thomas Kojo is an optimist in the face of what others would describe as a burden, and I admire him for that.Losing 2-0 to Ghana’s Black Meteors last Sunday at the Tamale Sports Stadium in the first leg of the Rio 2016 Olympic qualifiers, Kojo told journalists in Ghana that he is hopeful of qualification. Kojo will be inspiring his boys for the return leg at the same venue on Saturday, May 2. Kojo said his team’s overall output in the first encounter was good except few mistakes. “We have a good side. All our plans went well except…few mistakes that led to the two goals.  “Technically, we got what we wanted. Our approach, not hundred per cent though, overall we are impressed.” I am not sure Kojo is arguing that losing 2-0 was the objective of the match but it made sense to speculate that he had had the premonition of losing more than two goals. News reports indicated that Kojo adopted the 4-5-1 system. “The 4-5-1 system is both defensive and offensive,” Kojo admitted. It means that in the first leg, he had four players at the defense, five in the midfield and one on the top. Clearly, concentrating on defense with a player on the top would not threaten their opponents and it was the reason that Black Meteors had a field day, with their domination. But Liberia’s best period game in what a reporter described as, “during the dying embers of the game.” That was after Jr. Lone Star broke away from the 4-5-1 system and began to attack. Though the system may have prevented more goals against Jr. Lone Star, it did not help to threaten the Ghanaians. And though striker Sporo Somah, Prince Saydee, Herron Berrian and goalkeeper Allengton Sembeh proved outstanding, playing the 4-5-1 will hurt Jr. Lone Star on Saturday. Fact is that now the team must score 3-0 to qualify, and with the Ghanaians enjoying a comfortable 2-0 lead, Kojo’s hope to qualify sounds anything but a big HOPE. Another difficulty Kojo encountered was blending the foreign based players with the locals. His reason? “I never had the time to see them play together,” Kojo said of Sporo, Herron and Cooper. Then of course during the game when Jr. Lone Star could not make use of the few chances they created.“We created some good chances but we were robbed by poor finishing; we will indeed work on our scoring techniques,” was Kojo’s promise, all within a week? Kojo’s positive outlook on the two-tie game in Ghana should give his boys the fighting spirit beyond Saturday’s game.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

New taxi cooperative plans an allelectric fleet in Heredia

first_imgRecommended: The ultimate guide to taxis in Costa RicaWe’ve seen the ‘Red Fleet’ of licensed taxis in the streets; the porteadores, or private chauffeurs; the illegal pirate taxis called piratas; and, in recent years, Uber drivers, loved by some and hated by others.Now yet another category is upon us: electric taxis, if new cooperative in Heredia, north of San José, gets its way.Quiet, efficient and economical is how the cars are described by Alfredo Espinoza, one of the promoters of the new taxis he hopes to bring soon to the streets of Heredia. The idea came to light during a conversation among guests at a wedding reception, he explained.“We were talking about how Costa Rica produces so much electricity,” he recalled. There is hydro power, thermal and solar power. With so much electricity, why not use if for cars?“So right there we formed a group called Generation H: H for Heredia where we are located, and Generation because we are all different ages,” he explained. “We are all professionals with different backgrounds, so we understand the process of putting plans into action.”Espinoza is a retired specialist in auto mechanics who has worked in the United States and in Israel.“Costa Rica is a small country. An electric car can cross the country on one electric charge, and you find electricity in every corner,” he added. “You can charge up an electric car from your own home. With 110 voltage it takes up to eight hours. With 220 four to six hours, and with a special converter, about thirty minutes.”He calculated that about 90% of the driving in central Costa Rica is within the general metropolitan area, going to and from work or other short distances, and can be done on one charge per week.“First, we tried to convince the taxi cooperatives in Heredia to consider electric cars,” he said. “They rejected the idea because of the cost. An electric car costs more than an internal combustion model but over the long run, even the medium run, you save.  You save on fuel and maintenance costs.” Mitzi Stark / The Tico TimesLooking for other solutions, Generation H found backing from the Public Service Agency of Heredia and decided to form their own taxi cooperative.“With only two taxis to start off, we aren’t competing with other companies. We want to show them that electric taxis are feasible and economical,” says Espinoza.The cooperative faces various obstacles. One is the price of an electric car in Costa Rica, about $36,000, although the electric car bill moving through the Legislative Assembly would cut import taxes to reduce those costs significantly.Another is that the car Generation H hopes to use is not yet available. While various manufacturers are producing electric cars, Generation H hopes to use the Nissan Electric LEAF. Silvia Milano, in charge of sales for Nissan Costa Rica, says that before the cars go on sale, they must undergo tests to see how they fare in Costa Rica’s driving conditions.Finally, charging stations and trained mechanics for the new types of motors and systems will be needed. The first charging station opened in February in San Ramón.Milano said that Nissan have received a lot of interest in the LEAF and expects that in ten years’ time most of the cars on the roads will be electric.A look through the 2017 LEAF is an eye opener. A knob in the between the front seats puts you through the gears, and the controls on the dash show energy levels instead of fuel. The motor is compact and there are none of the standard components like spark plugs and radiators.In fact, a glance under the hood reveals a strangely bare space! The most important accessory is in the trunk: the cable and plug to connect your car.As Costa Rica move toward an electric car future, one cooperative in Heredia is raring to take to the streets with its own fleet of quiet, comfortable, and clean-air taxis.See also: Lawmakers exclude full hybrids from electric cars bill Facebook Comments Related posts:Lawmakers exclude full hybrids from electric cars bill Costa Rica prepared for this season’s harsh weather, energy officials say This Oregon company wants to build electric cars in Costa Rica Earth Hour in Costa Rica saved more electricity than in 2016last_img read more