ELBC Workers Union Draws Attention to Dilapidated Building

first_imgThe President of the Liberia Broadcasting System’s Workers Union has called on government and the general public to contribute towards the renovation of houses on the ELBC compound.In an exclusive interview with the Daily Observer, Mr. Moses G. Dorbor said the dilapidated conditions of the buildings have reduced space for various functions at the station, leading to workers being restricted to one building.“I am moved as a leader and a citizen with an intelligent mind to say that ELBC needs to experience better postwar benefits. For a little over 10 years now we have had peace and continue using this state broadcaster to inform, educate and entertain people of all walks of life, but we still see these buildings continue to lie in ruin since the civil war ended,” he said.“Holding all factors constant that this is our ‘Nation’s Pride,’ the government needs to see reason to prioritize the renovation of these buildings,” said Dorbor.LBS sources estimate that about US$1.5 million is needed to address the infrastructural problems of the state run broadcast entity.“Veteran media practitioners who served ELBC and every Liberian are encouraged to contribute towards the rebuilding of the offices and staff quarters at LBS that are important to the running of the station,” he continued.According to him, the daily intake for services at the station cannot amount to the sum that can possibly mitigate the pressing challenges.The LBS Workers Union president said though donors sympathize with ELBC, they are not responsible to do it all.“The international media institutions that come to help us,” he said, “have business oriented motives and are not prepared to do everything.”He said International media like BBC, CCTV and RFI collaborate with foreign media entities in order to get their frequencies active worldwide, but are not responsible to do everything for the station.Meanwhile, Mr. Dorbor appealed to the government to increase the budget of LBS from US$800,000 to an amount that will meet the present economic realities, because the current allotment cannot meet the needs of the station. He said maintenance of the generator, salary payments and stationery, among others, are basic pressing needs of the station that the above amount cannot totally address.He praised all his LBS colleagues for their level of cooperation in realizing successes thought to be impossible in times past.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

CMS Revises Readmissions Penalties How Hospital Networks Play Into Equation

first_imgKaiser Health News examines readmissions at hospitals, including how CMS has revised up penalities on hospitals who readmit patients too soon and how hospital networks play into the readmissions equation.Kaiser Health News: Medicare Revises Hospitals’ Readmissions PenaltiesMedicare’s new readmission penalties for hospitals just got a bit tougher. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services has discovered errors in its initial calculations in August. As a result, 1,422 hospitals with comparatively high readmission rates will lose slightly more money than they were expecting, according to a Kaiser Health News analysis of the revised penalties. Fifty-five hospitals will lose less than were previously told (Rau, 10/2). Kaiser Health News: Hospitals Need Networks To Prevent ReadmissionsA paradox of American health care is that hospitals are sometimes rewarded for doing things badly. Patients who are discharged, for example, shouldn’t have to come right back because their conditions get worse when they go home. But if they do come back, hospitals benefit, because they can fill an empty bed and bill for more care (Whitney, 10/2). This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. CMS Revises Readmissions Penalties; How Hospital Networks Play Into Equationlast_img read more