Former Syracuse football player Naesean Howard sentenced to 10 years in prison

first_img Published on February 17, 2017 at 12:09 pm Contact Tomer: tdlanger@syr.edu | @tomer_langer Facebook Twitter Google+ Former Syracuse football player Naesean Howard was sentenced to 10 years in prison on Friday morning. Three weeks ago, Howard pleaded guilty to one count of first-degree assault, one count of second-degree assault and one count of criminal possession of a weapon.The charges and sentencing stem back from an incident last April in which Howard stabbed two SU football players, Chauncey Scissum and Corey Winfield.Both Scissum and Winfield played this past season at Syracuse. Both also announced their intent to transfer at the end of the year. Winfield has since joined West Virginia. Commentslast_img read more

Astros’ Yuli Gurriel suspended five games in 2018, won’t miss World Series

first_img MLB’s 2018 suspension against Astros’ Yuli Gurriel gets negative reaction on social media HOUSTON — Houston Astros first baseman Yuli Gurriel will be suspended five games without pay in 2018 for making a racist gesture and remark toward Dodgers pitcher Yu Darvish in Friday’s Game 3 of the World Series, Commissioner Rob Manfred announced Saturday.After hitting a home run against Darvish in Game 2, Gurriel was caught on camera saying the word Chinito – Spanish slang for a person of Asian descent – and pressing his fingers against his eyes. Darvish, who was born in Japan, said the action was disrespectful to people “all around the world.”Related Articles Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Whicker: MLB does the wise thing in Yuli Gurriel case In announcing the suspension, the commissioner offered four reasons why Gurriel would not be forced to miss any time for the remainder of the World Series.“First of all, I felt it was important that the suspension carried with it the penalty of lost salary,” Manfred said. “Secondly, I felt it was unfair to punish the other 24 players on the Astros’ roster. I wanted the burden of this discipline to fall primarily on the wrongdoer. Thirdly, I was impressed in my conversation with Yu Darvish by his desire to move forward, and I felt that moving this suspension to the beginning of the season would help in that regard. Manfred declined “to characterize the conversations with the union, beyond the notion that the union was supportive of the general proposition that this type of behavior was not appropriate in our game.”Gurriel, 33, was born in Cuba. This is his first season of professional baseball in the United States. He spent a portion of the 2014 season playing in Japan, and said that his actions were in part motivated by his lack of success against Darvish and other Japanese pitchers.But Gurriel reiterated in a private meeting with Manfred that he intended no disrespect – comments that he echoed through an interpreter after Friday’s game.“Mr. Gurriel to his credit quickly realized that his behavior was wrong,” Manfred said. “He expressed remorse. I met with him today. He reiterated that remorse, and he assured me that he will be offering a private apology to Mr. Darvish.”Darvish wrote on his Twitter account that “I believe we should put our effort into learning rather than to accuse (Gurriel). If we can take something from this, that is a giant step for mankind.”MLB has suspended players for anti-gay slurs in recent years: Matt Joyce and Kevin Pillar received two-game suspensions this season, and Yunel Escobar received a three-game suspension in 2012.But this combination of a racial pejorative and an insulting gesture was new, at least for this decade and this commissioner. Manfred said he decided to go beyond the precedent established by the earlier suspensions “as a statement of our disapproval of this behavior.”Dodgers manager Dave Roberts, who was born to a Japanese mother and an African-American father, said he had no issue with Gurriel’s suspension waiting until next season.“I just really don’t want to take the focus off this series,” Roberts said. “Major League Baseball handled it the way they felt was appropriate. We support it and we’re trying to move on.“I don’t want any asterisks with him not being in there. I want the best team to win and to have it decided by the 25 players they have on the roster.”Houston general manager Jeff Luhnow said in a written statement that Gurriel’s forfeited salary will be donated “to the Astros Foundation and to a charity directly supporting diversity efforts.” “Last, when I originally began thinking about the discipline, I thought that delaying the suspension would allow the player the opportunity to exercise his rights under the grievance procedure. It now appears, and I have every expectation, that he will not be exercising those rights.”Gurriel will also be forced to undergo sensitivity training in the offseason, Manfred said. Had he been suspended immediately, Gurriel would have had the right under baseball’s Collective Bargaining Agreement to appeal the suspension and play during the World Series in the meantime. Video: Is Astros’ Yuli Gurriel making racist gesture about Dodgers’ Yu Darvish? Astros’ Yuli Gurriel apologizes for racist gesture after homer off Dodgers’ Yu Darvish last_img read more

Everton starlet could move to the Bundesliga before the transfer window closes

first_img England’s most successful clubs of the past decade, according to trophies won The 20-year-old made a huge impression at the Bundesliga club last term, bagging five goals in 11 appearances during the second-half of last season.Lookman was left out of the Everton squad which drew at Wolves last Saturday and his short-term future at Goodison Park remains in doubt.And despite the young winger’s desire to return to Leipzig, the Toffees have consistently ruled out his departure this summer.However Leipzig have not given up hope of landing Lookman on a permanent deal before the end of August. Everton youngster Ademola Lookman revealed How the Premier League table could change after the Boxing Day fixtures Every current Premier League club’s best kit from the past decade Sky Sports presenter apologises for remarks made during Neville’s racism discussion Everton starlet Ademola Lookman could still leave the club and join RB Leipzig this summer, according to Bild.The transfer window may be over in England but across Europe clubs are still doing business and the Bundesliga outfit remain keen on their former loanee. Most Popular Premier League News Guardiola-inspired tactics: Is this how Arsenal will line up under Arteta? predicted smart causal 1 changes center_img Did Mahrez just accidentally reveal Fernandinho is leaving Man City this summer? gameday cracker Boxing Day fixtures: All nine Premier League games live on talkSPORT Liverpool news live: Klopp reveals when Minamino will play and issues injury update latest The average first-team salaries at every Premier League club in 2019 whoops SORRY silverware possible standings How Everton could look in January under Ancelotti with new signings Everton are reportedly demanding close to £30million for the England under-21 international, with Leipzig only willing to part with £18million.A second loan spell could also be in the offing but with time running out, Leipzig must act quickly if they are to tempt Everton into parting with the youngster.last_img read more

Different Takes What To Do With CHIP Deal With Threats To Obamacare

first_img I haven’t yet read Hillary Clinton’s “What Happened,” but it seems pretty clear to me what did, in fact, happen in 2016. These days, America starts from a baseline of extreme tribalism: 47 or 48 percent of the electorate will vote for any Republican, no matter how terrible, and against any Democrat, no matter how good. This means, in turn, that small things — journalists acting like mean kids in high school, ganging up on candidates they consider uncool, events that suggest fresh scandal even when there’s nothing there — can tip the balance in favor of even the worst candidate imaginable. (Paul Krugman, 9/18) Different Takes: What To Do With CHIP; Deal With Threats To Obamacare Before Single Payer News outlets examine a variety of pressing health policy issues, ranging from the reauthorization of the Children’s Health Insurance Program to what’s next for the Affordable Care Act. “Medicare for all,” or “single-payer,” is becoming a rallying cry for Democrats. This is often accompanied by calls to match the health care coverage of “the rest of the world.” But this overlooks a crucial fact: The “rest of the world” is not all alike. The commonality is universal coverage, but wealthy nations have taken varying approaches to it, some relying heavily on the government (as with single-payer); some relying more on private insurers; others in between. (Aaron E. Carroll and Austin Frakt, 9/18) National Review: Continue To Fund Children’s Health Care, But Coordinate The Programs Better CHIP was a shared vision of Republicans and Democrats alike. It seems like ancient history now, but, in 1997, I joined with members from both sides of the aisle to debate health care policy forcefully but productively. Led by Senators Ted Kennedy (D-MA) and Orrin Hatch (R-UT), we crafted the CHIP language. Bipartisan action, so crucial to the health of the country and the economy, was never more important than when it came to insuring America’s children. Now, two decades later, that progress is in jeopardy. CHIP is set to expire on September 30. (Bill Frist, 9/14) This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. CHIP, which helps states provide health-care coverage to low-income kids, is better structured than Medicaid to ensure that funds are targeted to those who need assistance most. Now, after the Affordable Care Act has created an entitlement to subsidized coverage through the exchange, CHIP-eligible families are often torn between two programs that fit together poorly. If a few minor flaws in its design are fixed, however, CHIP can fill a gap and enhance the rest of America’s health-care safety net. (Chris Pope, 9/18) Thanks to massive grassroots mobilization efforts, our state narrowly averted disaster when Congress failed to pass any version of Affordable Care Act (ACA) repeal that would have restructured Medicaid and left thousands of my constituents without health care coverage. Stopping health care repeal was a huge victory, but the fight is not over yet. Even deeper cuts to Medicaid have been proposed in the 2018 budget resolution, which would slash health care by $1.5 trillion over the next 10 years to pay for billions in tax breaks to the rich and corporations over that same period. (Rep. C.A. “Dutch” Ruppersberger, 9/17) The New York Times: The Best Health Care System In The World: Which One Would You Pick? center_img Baltimore Sun: Medicaid Cuts Shift Burdens To States The New York Times: Complacency Could Kill Health Care Forbes: Children’s Health Insurance Program Demands Quick, Bipartisan Passage The Washington Post: A Century Ago, Women Fought For Access To Contraception. The Trump Administration Threatens To Undo Their Work. The Washington Post: Before Tackling Single-Payer, Save Obamacare Before supporters of universal health coverage get all wrapped up debating a single-payer system, they need to focus on a dire threat to the Affordable Care Act likely to come up for a vote in the Senate before the end of the month. The latest repeal bill is an offering from Republican Sens. Lindsey O. Graham (S.C.) and Bill Cassidy (La.) that would tear apart the existing system and replace it with block grants to the states. Block grants — flows of money for broad purposes with few strings attached — are a patented way to evade hard policy choices. All the tough decisions are kicked down to state capitals, usually with too little money to achieve the ends the block grant is supposed to realize. (E.J. Dionne, 9/17) Trump administration officials vow that they are going to take care of the health of moms and babies. But their pledge to cut funding to Planned Parenthood promises to do the opposite. The proposed cuts have focused not just on the procedure of legal abortion (which is, of course, another column), but also on eliminating access to contraceptives. These proposals ignore a fundamental truth: Access to birth control is central to women’s health. In fact, it always has been. (Lauren MacIvor Thompson, 9/15) last_img read more