SAY SORRY OR RESIGN, Mac LOCHLAINN TELLS GARDA BOSS

first_imgSinn Féin Justice spokesperson Pádraig MacLochlainn TD says that if Garda Commissioner Martin Callinan does not withdraw his comments and apologise to the Garda whistleblowers then he should resign.He was speaking as the controversy continues over the Commissioner’s use of the word ‘disgusting’ during a Dail hearing.Deputy MacLochlainn said: “The outrageous comments made by Garda Commissioner Martin Callinan when he last appeared before the Oireacthas Public Accounts Committee have fundamentally undermined the stated objective of this government to encourage and support whistleblowers in the public and private sector. “It is remarkable that weeks after making the comments the Commissioner still refuses to withdraw his remarks and apologise.“I welcome the fact that a number of government Ministers have called on the Commissioner to withdraw his comments but an apology is also required.“The people of this state expect that after the Cabinet meeting tomorrow the Taoiseach will demand a withdrawal and an apology from the Garda Commissioner.“If this is not forthcoming from the Commissioner then his position is untenable and he should resign.”  SAY SORRY OR RESIGN, Mac LOCHLAINN TELLS GARDA BOSS was last modified: March 24th, 2014 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:disgusting!Garda CommissionerMartin CallinanPadraig Mac Lochlainnlast_img read more

Cosmic Star Formation: When Elegant Theories Are Wrong

first_imgAn astronomer wrote about “cosmic train wrecks” in Science recently.1  Paolo Coppi (Yale) was speaking about galactic mergers, but he could have just as well been talking about current cosmological models.  Things once thought to be understood are coming in for new scrutiny, now that more powerful telescopes can peer deeper into the veiled hearts of galaxies.  One galaxy in particular, NGC 6240, thought to be the result of a merger, was mapped recently in unprecedented detail.     In the middle of a rather straightforward article describing current thinking about what happens when galaxies collide, how stars form, and how black holes behave, he ended one paragraph with a surprise.  It was kind of like the ending word “not” in the slang of young people – e.g., “Astronomers understand star formation – NOT!”Detailed observations of nearby galaxies, the only kind we could carry out until recently, identified two main modes of star formation: powerful and rapid “starbursts” caused by NGC 6240-like collisions and the much less dramatic but quasi-steady formation seen in the disk of our Galaxy.  Because objects like NGC 6240 are rare today, one might speculate that most stars form “quietly” in disks.  The larger, so-called elliptical galaxies, which do not contain much gas, then come from late-time mergers of smaller disk-dominated galaxies that have turned their gas into stars.  Mergers play a minor role, mainly gravitationally scrambling already-made stars.  While elegant, this story seems wrong.The problem is that now it appears most star formation appeared early in the history of the universe.  NGC 6240, with two black holes apparently orbiting its center, and no star formation going on today, may be a “common oddball,” – something that should have been rare, but appears to be representative of the state of the early universe.  Coppi called this “very surprising” and something that creates an “intriguing new problem for us” –Today’s elliptical galaxies are “red and dead” because they contain predominantly old (red) stars and are not forming new ones.  Very surprisingly, some of the elliptical progenitors also appear to be “red and dead”.  Unless we invoke a new mechanism that rapidly and permanently stops star formation, the most massive objects in simulations turn out to be too massive and never sufficiently red and dead.One solution is to include feedback from the accretion of a supermassive black hole in the models.  There seems to be observational support for actively-accreting black holes in systems like NGC 6240, with regions of active star formation going on.  “This plus the surprising discovery that every nearby elliptical galaxy contains a black hole with a mass proportional to that of the galaxy strongly hints that rapid star formation and rapid black-hole feeding and growth are both inevitable and closely connected consequences of a cosmic train wreck like NGC 6240 where gas is gravitationally squeezed into a very small volume.”  But where does the language of observation get distinguished from theory in such a statement?    From that point on, Coppi focused on prospects for improved observations.  The Laser Interferometry Space Antenna (LISA), expected to be operational in 2015, might be able to detect the signature of black hole mergers through gravitational waves they emit.  But there is “considerable speculation,” he said, about whether black holes accrete slowly by feeding on their own stars, or form catastrophically through mergers of galaxies.  He’s not even sure LISA would be able to tell.    In his discussion, Coppi was assuming black holes are real.  Better not tell him about other astronomers who are denying that black holes even exist.  A recent article in ScienceNOW Daily News began,If new calculations are correct, the universe just got even stranger.  Scientists at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, have constructed mathematical formulas that conclude black holes cannot exist.  The findings–if correct–could revolutionize astrophysics and resolve a paradox that has perplexed physicists for 4 decades.There’s no doubt that very massive, compact objects exist in the centers of many galaxies.  Asked what to do with these observations, which lead most astronomers to believe the universe is full of black holes, “‘[Lawrence] Krauss replies, ‘How do you know they’re black holes?”  No one has actually seen a black hole, he says, and anything with a tremendous amount of gravity–such as the supermassive remnants of stars–could exert effects similar to those researchers have blamed on black holes.”    Krauss and colleagues performed detailed calculations taking into account the relativity of time.  They showed that time stops before a singularity forms, meaning “black holes can’t form at all.”  If so, one consequence is that “In essence, physicists have been arguing over a trick question for 40 years.”  Their claim is controversial at this time.  Critics point to other observations which support the “traditional” black hole explanation.  What all might agree on is that the new observations and theories show that the universe is, indeed, getting stranger.1Paolo Coppi, “Inside a Cosmic Train Wreck,” Science, 29 June 2007: Vol. 316. no. 5833, pp. 1852-1854, DOI: 10.1126/science.1139057.The point of this entry is not to take a position on controversies about star formation, black holes or galactic mergers, but to illustrate the difference between real objects and scientific objects.  A scientific object is something about which we cannot know directly through experience: a black hole, a quark, the core of the earth, the interior of the sun, a universal common ancestor, a prebiotic soup, etc.  Nobody denies that cars exist, and that if you drive one into a telephone pole, bad things will happen.  But scientific objects can only be inferred indirectly.  Scientists conceive of their objects as useful entities in equations, and elements of their models in theories.  How real are they?  That is an entirely different question.    Here we have seen astronomers and cosmologists struggling with and arguing over some scientific objects.  There is no question that they “feel” these things are real, and “believe” they are discussing objective reality, but how can they justify those beliefs?  As with Darwinism, new and better observations frequently raise new puzzles and occasionally threaten to overthrow what was formerly thought to be well understood.  As “elegant” as some ideas may seem, that alone does not prove they represent reality.  The universe has no obligation to submit to human measures of elegance.    It may have been elegant to envision galaxies aging slowly, with star formation occurring at a relaxed rate over billions of years.  It may have been elegant to envision ellipticals as relics of mergers that stripped away their gas and left them as museums of already-formed stars.  Now what?  The new observations led Coppi to admit, “While elegant, this story seems wrong.”  Now he has to tweak his scientific objects.  Now he has to envision a new mechanism that “rapidly and permanently stops star formation,” or has to tweak the models to include feedback from gravitational collapse, or has to keep black holes from colliding.  Then Krauss et al come along and claimed black holes are not real.  At what point can they claim their scientific objects are real objects?    Dr. Steven Goldman (Lehigh U) produced an interesting 12-hour series for the Teaching Company on this problem: “Science Wars: What Scientists Know and How They Know It.”  We’ve mentioned the applicability of these lectures before to questions we often discuss here.  In excruciating detail, Goldman gives example after example of controversy in all areas of science for over 2,000 years.  Are scientists talking about truth and reality, or are they merely playing games, like members of a fraternity?  Do the scientific objects they talk about represent reality or not?    Goldman leaves the controversy open.  His only suggestion, offered as a personal opinion in the last lecture, was that we don’t talk about scientific objects as realities, but as actualities – useful entities that allow scientists to make headway in their attempts to understand nature.  Yet it should be clear with a little analysis that this is mere quibbling over definitions.  Unless an actuality corresponds to reality, what is it?  If it isn’t real, or cannot be demonstrated to be real, then what kind of work are scientists doing?  That leads to other serious and troubling questions: should the public pay for it?  If all they are doing is speculating about things they cannot know, then what value does it have over other kinds of inquiry, that we should grant it epistemic authority and millions of dollars in funding?    Goldman illustrates the point that almost everything scientists thought they knew at the turn of the 20th century is now considered to be wrong.  There is hardly any scientific object, whether the earth, the atom, the universe, mass, time, space, the mind, consciousness, or just about anything else from physics to economics, that is looked at the same way today.  A logical corollary is that we have no confidence in 2007 that we understand scientific objects so well that our ideas will not be overturned a hundred years hence.    These kinds of questions need to be considered every time scientists talk about the objects of their study as if they are arriving at “the truth” about the universe.  Better data, better equipment, and better observations are essential.  We are not the ones to judge, however, the point at which our data are so good, and our ideas so solid, that no further scrutiny is needed.  The history of scientific revolutions warns us that even Newtonian physics, the epitome of rock-solid science, was vulnerable.  This is not to say that we must doubt everything.  Rocket scientists, after all, do get spaceships to Saturn at the right spot and the right time.  Scientists must be doing something right.  When observations continue to contradict theory for decades, though, and when the scientific objects involved are especially remote and far from experience, there is one law that actually gains credibility:  Murphy’s.(Visited 48 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

New body to empower South African women

first_imgThe local branch of the multi-nationalBusiness and Professional Women willstrive to ensure that women get moreopportunities in the business world.(Image: MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. Formore free photos, visit the image library) MEDIA CONTACTS • Toni GomesPresident, BPW South Africa+27 11 794 4991 or +27 83 212 9134 RELATED ARTICLES • SA women leaders unite for change • Women’s Month launched in SA • Women gain power, vote by vote • Clinton makes her mark in SA• SA’s women power aheadApril McAlisterThe local chapter of the international organisation Business and Professional Women (BPW), a fairly new entity in South Africa, is set to launch a national campaign to bring about change in business principles and the Companies Act so that women will have more of a say in decision- and policy-making, and be better equipped for their respective roles.BPW has had consultative status with the UN through the Economic and Social Council since 1947. At present there are a total of 21 members serving as representatives at the UN and its subsidiary organs, specialised agencies and related organisations.It has 90 branches in 80 countries throughout the world and assisted the UN in the promotion of its Women’s Empowerment Principles, a joint initiative of the United Nations Fund for the Development of Women and the UN Global Compact (UNGC).Subtitled Equality Means Business, these principles offer guidance on empowering women in the work situation, marketplace and community.The Department of Trade and Industry’s South African Women’s Entrepreneurial Network and BPW signed a memorandum of understanding in November 2010 and, together with the UNGC, will collaborate on projects pertaining to the empowerment of women.These include a register of women who are ready to sit on boards but have been overlooked, certification for businesses owned by women, and corporate governance training for women-owned businesses, particularly the small to medium enterprises. The DTI will give its accreditation to all courses.In a letter to BPW, UNCG’s executive director Georg Kell commended the organisation and expressed his hopes that equality for women in business would become one of its priorities.The Equality Means Business initiative will launch officially in South Africa on International Women’s Day, 8 March 2011. Download a booklet on the campaign (PDF, 365KB).Smashing the glass ceilingAt the fourth conference of the Alexandria Businesswomen Association in Egypt in October, BPW South Africa president Toni Gomes gave a presentation on the forthcoming national Equality Means Business campaign. Women at the event also took the opportunity to exchange new trends and methodologies.“As a delegate at the Alexandrian conference,” said Gomes, “I was enthralled at the work being done for women’s empowerment in the Arab countries.”She added, “The majority of Arabic women are in fact highly qualified businesswomen and professionals who hold very senior positions in the workplace.”Gomes believes that, despite the differences in culture, South Africa can learn a tremendous amount from Arab countries on advancing women in the business world.She recently returned from Berlin where she attended the inaugural International Businesswomen Forum. Here she presented a paper on women’s empowerment and spoke on the BPW’s upcoming campaign.As a registered non-profit organisation, BPW South Africa is looking for sponsorship to ensure sustainability. Once the campaign is launched, corporate partners may choose one or more principles with which to work toward their common goals.Representatives from BPW and Internationale Weiterbildung und Entwicklung gGmbH, a government funding agency in Germany, have met for discussions but have not disclosed the amount of funding, if any.Exchange of ideasIn April 2010, prominent women from Germany, South East Asia, Egypt and Southern Africa attended the North Rhine-Westphalian Businesswomen’s Convention held in Gelsenkirchen, Germany. The prevalent Icelandic volcanic ash and its effects did not deter the women, who made alternate arrangements to get to the venue and were able to exchange new ideas for developing their own conferences.An international strategic workshop also took place, where the delegates discussed how to maximise the economic potential of women, among other important topics. Internationally there is a growing awareness of how the role of women as entrepreneurs can influence political stability and economic development.The World Bank, UN and the International Labour Organisation have programmes in place which focus on starting a small business and getting access to micro-credit. The push now is to develop strategies to strengthen the economic role of women entrepreneurs.Women’s Empowerment Principles:Establish high-level corporate leadership for gender equality;Treat all women and men fairly at work – respect and support human rights and non-discrimination;Ensure the health, safety and wellbeing of all women and men workers;Promote education, training and professional development for women;Implement enterprise development, supply chain and marketing practices that empower women;Promote equality through community initiatives and advocacy;Measure and publicly report on progress to achieve gender equality.(Image: MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. For more free photos, visit the image library)last_img read more

Dr Ncumisa Jilata: Africa’s youngest neurosurgeon

first_imgAt the age of 29, Mthatha-born Dr Ncumisa Jilata has become Africa’s youngest neurosurgeon following her Fellowship graduation in Durban on 18 May 2017. Her milestone achievement was highlighted by Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa in an address to the National Assembly on 31 May.South African neurosurgeon Dr Ncumisa Jilata (left) with Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa. Ramaphosa made special mention of Jilata becoming Africa’s youngest neurosurgeon in an address to Parliament on 31 May 2017. (Image: Ncumisa Jilata Facebook)CD AndersonDr Ncumisa Jilata completed her Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery (MBChB) degree at Mthatha’s Walter Sisulu University (WSU) in 2009. Her completed fellowship for the Council of Neurosurgeons of South Africa in 2017 means she is now the youngest neurosurgeon in Africa, and one of only five black female brain surgeons in South Africa.Jilata joins 150 other female doctors and medical residents working in the neurosurgical field across Africa, according to the most recent survey by the World Federation of Neurological Societies.She hopes that her landmark achievement will inspire more female medical students to add to much-needed surgical expertise on the continent. Jilata was inspired while still in high school to follow her dream of becoming a brain surgeon.“I was already in Grade 11 [at Mthatha High School] when I decided I wanted to be a doctor, but at the time I wasn’t doing biology, so when I got to matric I had to do three years of biology in one year, in addition to the subjects I had already selected from Grade 10,” Jilata told the Eastern Cape Daily Dispatch newspaper following her graduation.“During that period I discovered the concept of a neuron, which is amazing. The fact that society as a whole was influenced and controlled solely by the existence of this structure, intrigued me… that’s when I knew I wanted to be a neurosurgeon.”She had to work hard to prove herself in the male-dominated field of medicine, Jilata said. “It was common to be second-guessed as a woman, but one’s work ethic will always speak volumes.” She hopes to become a worthy standard for young girls, to give them the courage to “break through the barriers of patriarchy” in medical science.Another pioneering female and Eastern Cape-born neurosurgeon, Dr Coceka Mfundisi, inspired Jilata. “[My mentor] Dr Mfundisi… broke most of the barriers for me [to get where I am today].”Born in rural Engcobo, Mfundisi was one of the first black South African woman to qualify in the neurology field.“[Jilata] had heard about me because I had worked in Mthatha for about a year while I was still training as a neurosurgeon at the University of Pretoria,” Mfundisi told the Daily Dispatch. “I was the only woman among men and when she told me she wanted to be a neurosurgeon I could already see her working with me at the University of Pretoria, where she later joined me… [Her] success is a proud moment for the impoverished community of the Eastern Cape and a victory for every woman, especially because she did everything in record time, at a very young age.”WSU spokesperson Yonela Tukwayo said the university was proud of Jilata’s accomplishment. “She and many other WSU alumni, who are leaders across different fields of medicine and other professions, represent the true spirit of our university namesake, Walter Sisulu.”During his address at the Presidency Budget Vote in Parliament’s National Assembly on 31 May 2017, Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa made special mention of Jilata’s achievement. Including her story in an overview of several South African women breaking barriers in a number of social development and medical fields, Ramaphosa thanked Jilata “for inspiring us, motivating us and challenging us with your [life] and your determination… demonstrating what is possible with perseverance, courage, collaboration and partnership”.Source: Daily Dispatch, South African Government website Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

Geocaching.com’s Lost & Found Video Trailer

first_imgLost & Found celebrates ten amazing years of geocaching and it stars YOU!We’ve spent months uncovering the heartwarming, jaw-dropping and wondrous stories that define the worldwide phenomenon. Here’s a trailer of what’s in store in our Lost & Found series. You’ll see new videos released each week starting this May. Coming soon you’re invited to explore a new Geocaching.com destination dedicated to “discovering the lost stories of geocaching.” You’ll also be able to add your own favorite Lost & Found stories. Let us know what you think!Share with your Friends:More SharePrint RelatedGroundspeak Weekly Newsletter – 6/3/2010May 22, 2010In “News”The Founders – Geocaching’s Lost & Found Video PremiereMay 18, 2010In “Community”Groundspeak Weekly Newsletter – January 5, 2011January 5, 2011In “Groundspeak’s Weekly Newsletter”last_img read more

Former Air Force receiver hoping NFL is a dream delayed

first_img“I think that day was pretty much a win for me as far as, first of all, being there,” Robinette told The Associated Press by phone from Nellis Air Force Base in Las Vegas, where he’s a logistics flight commander for the 58th Rescue Squadron. “It looked like 100 people that were there from the NFL.“Just being there and to have eyes on me, especially after laying low for the last two years, was awesome,” Robinette said. “And I think from a performance stance, I did pretty well. I looked pretty smooth. I feel really good about it.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logisticsRobinette told teams he expects to be available full time by August or September but has saved up vacation days to be able to attend offseason training programs, minicamps and training camps to show his hiatus from football wasn’t a hindrance.Robinette was the first Air Force player ever invited to the East-West Shrine Game, the Senior Bowl and the NFL scouting combine. He also expected to be the first one ever to go straight into the pros like standout Navy quarterback Keenan Reynolds had done a year earlier when he was drafted by the Baltimore Ravens. “My goal is just getting a shot,” said Robinette, who already has the answer for any team wanting to know why it should take a chance of a guy who’s been out of football for two years: because he’s been serving his country, growing as a leader and following the chain of command.“I’ll say, ‘I can still play at a high level, I’m very coachable and really able to buy into an organization and their mission and goal,’” Robinette said. “You don’t have to worry about me being a knucklehead.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting “I wasn’t raised that way, to carry a grudge, to be bitter about something like that,” Robinette said.He had the same outlook after his commission and graduation were subsequently delayed by several months.“Absolutely, it was another part of my path,” Robinette said. “Because I was associated with someone who was in an open investigation, I was a witness and with that going on, the academy felt that until that played out, I had to stay there in close range until things got settled down or they figured out what was going on.”Meantime, Robinette was invited to minicamps with the Bills and Patriots but neither team signed him with his two-year active-duty commitment looming.He received his commission and graduation on Sept. 7, 2017, and was stationed at Nellis, where he said he was determined to grow as an Air Force officer and train in his spare time to keep his NFL dream alive.At first he was only able to lift weights and do some speed work, but this year he began training with the 58th Rescue Squadron, which has its own workout facility because its tasks are so arduous.“So now I have a full field where I can work on route running, agility drills, stuff like that,” he said.A week before Ohio State’s pro day, Robinette went back to Colorado Springs for Air Force’s pro day, where his trainer clocked him at 4.53 seconds in the 40-yard dash, nearly a 10th of a second faster than his 4.62 clocking at the NFL combine two years ago.Even though he’ll need to shake some rust off his game, Robinette said, “people are always developing in the NFL.” Besides, he said he’s a better prospect now for having spent the last two years focusing on growing as an officer and a teammate.He’ll gladly pack weight onto his 6-foot-3, 220-pound frame if somebody sees him as a tight end prospect instead of a receiver: “Heck, if you need me to put my hand in the ground and play tackle, I’m fine with that.” SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Hontiveros presses for security audit of national power grid DA eyes importing ‘galunggong’ anew Cayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess That year, the DOD revised its pro sports policy, allowing graduates of service academies to apply for Ready Reserve so they could begin their pro sports careers immediately.Robinette maintained a full class load his final semester while commuting 100 miles six days a week to train with other NFL hopefuls, including Christian McCaffrey, at Landow Performance, a facility in suburban Denver owned by Loren Landow, who is now the Denver Broncos strength coach.Robinette was projected as a mid-round selection in 2017 but went undrafted after learning he would have to fulfill his two-year active duty commitment after all. He was told as the first round was underway that Air Force leaders had informed the academy that cadets would still be required to serve at least two years on active duty. That was a precursor to an official reversal of the DOD’s pro sports policy shortly after Jim Mattis was appointed secretary of defense.The Pentagon said graduates from military academies receive their educations at taxpayer expense, so prospective professional athletes would have to follow in the steps of Roger Staubach, Chad Hennings and David Robinson and first serve their country.Robinette insists he wasn’t embittered by the policy reversal .ADVERTISEMENT Philippine Arena Interchange inaugurated LATEST STORIES FIFA chief hails re-election of Asian football chief Panelo: Duterte ‘angry’ with SEA Games hosting hassles MOST READ PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss Duterte wants probe of SEA Games mess FILE – In this Feb. 16, 2017, file photo, Air Force wide receiver Jalen Robinette takes part in a drill to prepare for the NFL Combine at a workout facility in Centennial, Colo. Two years after the U.S. Defense Department thwarted his plans of going straight from the Air Force Academy to the NFL, Robinette is determined to turn that detour into a dream delayed as he approaches the fulfillment of his two-year commitment of active duty. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)DENVER — Two years after the U.S. Defense Department thwarted his plans of going straight from the Air Force Academy to the NFL, Falcons all-time leading receiver Jalen Robinette is determined to turn that detour into a dream delayed, not dashed.Close to fulfilling his two-year active-duty commitment, Robinette recently competed in Ohio State’s pro day, where he caught passes from quarterback Dwayne Haskins and glances from pro scouts intrigued by the muscular 25-year-old who hasn’t played since 2016, when he led the nation with a 27.4-yard average.ADVERTISEMENT View commentslast_img read more

10 months agoEverton plan bids for Bournemouth striker Wilson, Batshuayi

first_imgEverton plan bids for Bournemouth striker Wilson, Batshuayiby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveEverton are aiming for a busy January market.The Daily Express says manager Marco Silva has been forced to utilise Richarlison up front, with Cenk Tosun and Oumar Niasse not trusted to lead the line.And director of football Marcel Brands wants to secure another goal-getter’s signature in the new year.Callum Wilson has been lined up after impressing at Bournemouth.While Chelsea striker Michy Batshuayi is on Everton’s radar too with his loan spell at Valencia potentially set to be cancelled. TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

14 days agoWaddle urges Tottenham star Alli, Lingard to change approach

first_imgWaddle urges Tottenham star Alli, Lingard to change approachby Paul Vegas14 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveChris Waddle says Tottenham star Dele Alli and Manchester UnitedJesse Lingard must find a new approach to their games if they want to return to the England fold.Both players have endured a tough start to the 2019/20 and were recently omitted from Gareth Southgate’s squad for this week’s qualifiers against Czech Republic and Bulgaria.Speaking to racingpost.com, Waddle said: “The players who have been dropped need to think about having a Plan B. When young players come on to the scene, they get all the headlines and are talked about as though they have been doing it for 400 games. They can have unbelievable seasons but then go off the boil. Players can get lazy and believe the hype.”Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain has had a bad injury. He’s a good all-round footballer who acts as an engine for the team and scores goals. I think there’s plenty more to come from him for England if he stays away from injury. Dele Alli has wonderful ability but I just think he has been worked out by opposing coaches. The same goes for Jesse Lingard. It’s time for him to look at his game and work at it on the training ground – it can take as little as 20 minutes per day – and develop a new approach.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Modi arrives in France for G7 Summit

first_imgBiarritz: Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Sunday arrived in France to attend the G7 Summit where he will speak on burning global issues of environment, climate and digital transformation and also meet the world leaders. Modi arrived here from Manama after concluding his three-nation tour to France, the UAE and Bahrain where he offered prayers at the Shreenathji Temple, the oldest temple in the Gulf region. During the G7 Summit, which will be held in the picturesque seaside French town of Biarritz, the Prime Minister will address sessions on environment, climate, oceans and digital transformation. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’Though India is not a member of the G-7 grouping, Modi has been personally invited by French President Emmanuel Macron. The Ministry of External Affairs (MEA) had said that the invitation was a “reflection of the personal chemistry” between the two leaders and also “recognition of India as a major economic power”. The countries which are part of the G7 include the UK, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, and the US. On the sidelines of the G7 Summit, Modi and US President Donald Trump are likely to discuss the situation in Kashmir, trade issues and other topics of mutual interest. Earlier this week in Washington, Trump said that he would discuss with Prime Minister Modi the situation in Kashmir and help ease the Indo-Pak tensions.last_img read more

Rethinking The NFLs Rooney Rule For More Diversity At The Top

As word spread quickly in January 2007 that Mike Tomlin would be the next head coach of the Pittsburgh Steelers, no one needed to explain the significance of the move to Steve Jackson. Then a safeties coach with the Washington Redskins, Jackson was among the many African-American assistants rooting for Tomlin to get the job. Just a few years earlier, Tomlin, who had just completed his first season as the Minnesota Vikings’ defensive coordinator, probably wouldn’t have been on the short list for one of the most prestigious coaching gigs in professional sports. But under the Rooney Rule, times were changing.“For me, that’s the one that really stood out,” said Jackson, now the Tennessee Titans’ assistant secondary coach. “It was the Steelers. That’s one of those jobs that everyone looks at. And he wasn’t the leading candidate when he walked in for the interview, but he got in that room and he made his case. That’s what we all want: just to have a real chance to compete for the job. A lot of us [black coaches] looked at that and said, ‘Yeah.’”There’s no debating that the Rooney Rule has had a positive impact on the NFL. By providing owners with the first leaguewide tool to make hiring potentially more inclusive, the NFL took a significant step toward changing its culture. The rule continues to be expanded, and major corporations have followed the league’s lead. But in a workplace in which the overwhelming majority of players are African-American, the NFL has many more opportunities to strengthen the rule and further increase diversity in its management ranks.In place since 2003 for head coaches and expanded in 2009 to include general manager jobs and equivalent front-office positions, the rule — named after Dan Rooney, Pittsburgh Steelers chairman and onetime head of the league’s diversity committee — mandates that an NFL team must interview at least one minority candidate for these jobs. The rule, however, has two fatal flaws: the temptation to substitute sham interviews in place of a search for real diversity, and coordinator-level positions, a crucial step to head-coaching jobs, are not under the umbrella.The NFL did recently expand the rule again to include women: For all executive openings in the commissioner’s office, a woman must be interviewed. The San Francisco 49ers were the first team to formally adopt the practice, but the same flaws still apply.But the league did provide a blueprint for corporate America to improve its poor hiring record when it comes to diversity. Facebook, Pinterest, Intel, Xerox and Amazon are among the major companies that have instituted their own version of the rule. Even the Pentagon has explored using some form of the rule to diversify its officer corps.“The Rooney Rule really has become the best practice for diversity and inclusion,” said Robert Gulliver, the NFL’s executive vice president of human resources and chief diversity officer. “The Rooney Rule is all about access and opportunity, and it’s exciting to see where we are now after having the Rooney Rule in place for 12 years when you look at what the Rooney Rule has delivered.”In the 12 seasons before the rule was instituted, the NFL had only six non-white head coaches. In 12 seasons under the rule, the league has added 14 head coaches of color. From the NFL’s standpoint, there were other encouraging numbers last season regarding diversity. The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sports at the University of Central Florida found that:At the start of last season, there were six head coaches of color, one more than in 2014. In 2011, the NFL had an all-time high of eight head coaches of color.There were seven African-American general managers in 2015 and for the ninth consecutive year, there were at least five general managers of color.Eight of the last 18 Super Bowl teams have had either an African-American head coach or general manager.Clearly, minorities have made modest strides in filling leadership positions. The problem is, there are 32 NFL teams. Even at its highest point, minority representation among coaches was a meager 25 percent. Almost 68 percent of the NFL’s players are African-American, but there are no African-American team presidents, and only one team president of color. Although the NFL received an A grade for overall racial-hiring practices from Central Florida, only 19.4 percent of the league’s professional positions — front-office and business-operations personnel — were filled by “people of color” in 2015. The numbers tell the story: There’s still plenty of work to do.Jeremi Duru wrote the book on the Rooney Rule. Literally. In Advancing The Ball: Race, Reformation, and the Quest for Equal Coaching Opportunity in the NFL, Duru masterfully details the history of the process that resulted in the rule. Duru, a law professor at American University’s Washington College of Law, agrees that the rule is not perfect, but “the whole idea of it is to prompt kind of a culture change in the league,” he said. “It’s not that the outcome of each particular interviewing season is going to vindicate the rule, but rather that the rule will put in place the sense that, in order to be the best, you have to think broadly. It’s the idea that in order to succeed and be competitive, you have to look at a deep pool of candidates.”One of the biggest criticisms of the rule is that it hasn’t effected change fast enough. For the rule to have been in place so long, some African-American commentators have argued, the NFL should have many more minorities in the highest-ranking positions. “It’s extremely difficult to eradicate a long-standing problem quickly,” Duru said. “The Emancipation Proclamation itself isn’t going to be a panacea. But it creates a culture where there’s no longer lawful slavery, and where we start to see progress, slowly but surely.“In the end in the NFL, hopefully, the idea is that it really becomes clear that the best coaches come from all sorts of different places. And if you think broadly about coaching and you slow down and take time with your hire, you’re going to find yourself with the best outcome. It’s not a consequence of the rule itself, but of the culture that the rule has ushered in.”Unfortunately for the NFL, the public perception is that sham interviews are integral to the league’s culture. Invariably each season, rumors have swirled that some teams interviewed African-American candidates only to comply with the rule. In January, the timing and execution of the Philadelphia Eagles’ hiring of new coach Doug Pederson raised questions about whether they had violated the spirit of the rule. The Eagles interviewed Duce Staley, a former Philadelphia player and current assistant coach on the team. Staley had never been a coordinator and only served as a position coach for three seasons. To many league observers, it appeared the Eagles had skirted the rule by interviewing an in-house candidate who obviously lacked the experience to be a head coach.That’s where the Fritz Pollard Alliance comes in. Together with the league’s front office, they determine whether a team’s interview process is legitimate. In the first year of the rule, commissioner Roger Goodell’s predecessor, Paul Tagliabue, fined former Detroit Lions general manager Matt Millen $200,000 for “failing to discharge his duties” under the rule.Although the specter of fines should serve as a deterrent to teams violating the rule, there’s another step the league could take to ensure compliance besides the removal of draft picks: require teams to provide transcripts of interviews with minority candidates. That way, the Fritz Pollard Alliance and the commissioner’s office could judge for themselves whether teams adhered to the spirit of the rule.“The Rooney Rule requires that there be a meaningful interview of a person of color, not just an interview,” Duru said. “Any mechanism that can be used to ensure an interview that is meaningful should be on the table.”However, among NFL decision-makers, there’s no momentum for detailed transcripts to become part of the process. “What is important is getting interview feedback,” the NFL’s Gulliver said. “We really do find that getting feedback, getting candidate feedback, on what worked and what didn’t work, and what can even be better the next time, will help candidates as they continue their quests to become a head coach or a general manager.”That being said, covering more potential candidates under the rule would seem to be a logical next step. Generally, coordinators have the most responsibility among assistant coaches. Owners often pluck coordinators from successful teams to become head coaches. If there were more minority coordinators in the pipeline, theoretically, there would be more minorities in the applicant pool for head coaching positions. The Rooney Rule does nothing to address that basic fact.In response to the NFL’s horrible hiring record after the 2012 season (eight head coaches and seven general managers were fired; 15 white guys were hired), the Fritz Pollard Alliance proposed that coordinator-level and team president positions should be covered under the rule. The NFL rejected the proposal, but in 2013 the league did restart the Career Development Symposium, which previously ran from 1998-2008.The commissioner’s office requested that teams send two representatives, including at least one person of color, who aspire to be general managers and head coaches, to a three-day program at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Besides networking with decision-makers from throughout the league, participants honed their interview skills through presentations and panel discussions. (In March, the league had its first Women’s Career Development Symposium.)But remember: Last season, the league had only six head coaches of color and seven African-American general managers. Obviously, the Career Development Symposium didn’t hobble efforts to improve minority hiring — but how much did it help? It just seems that including coordinator positions under the rule could be another major turning point in the ongoing struggle to level the playing field.In ESPN The Magazine’s Feb. 8 Super Bowl 50 Issue, senior writer Mina Kimes wrote that white position coaches and assistants are more than twice as likely to be promoted to coordinator than their African-American counterparts, according to research from professors at Georgetown, George Washington, Emory and Iowa State University. Moreover, those promotions occur regardless of the white coaches’ performance, experience and coaching background. The data shouldn’t be ignored.The Titans’ Jackson is a 13-year NFL assistant. Despite his experience, Jackson knows it’s downright impossible to make the leap from an assistant coach to a head coach without first being a coordinator.“There’s always a network, an inner circle, and then there are others,” he said. “And if you’re in the others, you have to do everything you can to get in the door.”The argument against expanding the rule to include coordinator positions is that head coaches should be allowed to pick their staffs without any restrictions on interviewing. There may be something to that.During the 2007 and 2008 seasons, Brian Stewart directed the Dallas Cowboys’ defense. If coordinators are covered under the rule, Stewart envisions the potential for conflict. “That would be rough,” said Stewart, now a college coach at Nebraska who works with defensive backs. “You really have to leave picking those guys [coordinators] to the head coaches. They have to be allowed to choose their own people.“That’s one of the benefits of reaching the level of head coach. And if you don’t let them interview only the guys they want to interview, it could really open up a can of worms when you talk about relationships on the staff. If guys feel like a coordinator didn’t get the job the right way, there could be a lot of resentment from all the other assistants. It could be a problem. It could be a big problem.”Of course, there’s often resistance to change. When the rule was instituted, many within the league suggested head coaches wouldn’t have credibility if they were hired as a result of the process. But who would argue that great coaches such as Hall of Famer Tony Dungy, Tomlin and Carolina Panthers’ Ron Rivera lack credibility? The Steelers’ pick of Tomlin worked out spectacularly.The Rooney Rule is still evolving and growing pains are part of the process. But with the NFL on the right track, it’s definitely not time to slow down. More stories from The Undefeated:Serena: The embodiment of it all by LZ GrandersonDon’t believe the fairy-tale mythology that sports promote by Domonique FoxworthWill my 2-year-old nephew end up like Michael Brown? by Wendi Thomas Editor’s note: Tuesday was opening day at The Undefeated, a new ESPN website that explores the intersections of race, sports and culture. In an introductory letter, Kevin Merida, its editor-in-chief, says the site won’t shrink from covering challenging subjects with a mix of original reporting, innovative storytelling, provocative commentary, must-see video, narratives and investigations. At FiveThirtyEight, we’re so excited at having a new sibling that we’ve been running several of The Undefeated’s articles on our site this week — including the one that follows here — and we have big plans for partnerships in the future. read more