ELBC Workers Union Draws Attention to Dilapidated Building

first_imgThe President of the Liberia Broadcasting System’s Workers Union has called on government and the general public to contribute towards the renovation of houses on the ELBC compound.In an exclusive interview with the Daily Observer, Mr. Moses G. Dorbor said the dilapidated conditions of the buildings have reduced space for various functions at the station, leading to workers being restricted to one building.“I am moved as a leader and a citizen with an intelligent mind to say that ELBC needs to experience better postwar benefits. For a little over 10 years now we have had peace and continue using this state broadcaster to inform, educate and entertain people of all walks of life, but we still see these buildings continue to lie in ruin since the civil war ended,” he said.“Holding all factors constant that this is our ‘Nation’s Pride,’ the government needs to see reason to prioritize the renovation of these buildings,” said Dorbor.LBS sources estimate that about US$1.5 million is needed to address the infrastructural problems of the state run broadcast entity.“Veteran media practitioners who served ELBC and every Liberian are encouraged to contribute towards the rebuilding of the offices and staff quarters at LBS that are important to the running of the station,” he continued.According to him, the daily intake for services at the station cannot amount to the sum that can possibly mitigate the pressing challenges.The LBS Workers Union president said though donors sympathize with ELBC, they are not responsible to do it all.“The international media institutions that come to help us,” he said, “have business oriented motives and are not prepared to do everything.”He said International media like BBC, CCTV and RFI collaborate with foreign media entities in order to get their frequencies active worldwide, but are not responsible to do everything for the station.Meanwhile, Mr. Dorbor appealed to the government to increase the budget of LBS from US$800,000 to an amount that will meet the present economic realities, because the current allotment cannot meet the needs of the station. He said maintenance of the generator, salary payments and stationery, among others, are basic pressing needs of the station that the above amount cannot totally address.He praised all his LBS colleagues for their level of cooperation in realizing successes thought to be impossible in times past.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Different Takes What To Do With CHIP Deal With Threats To Obamacare

first_img I haven’t yet read Hillary Clinton’s “What Happened,” but it seems pretty clear to me what did, in fact, happen in 2016. These days, America starts from a baseline of extreme tribalism: 47 or 48 percent of the electorate will vote for any Republican, no matter how terrible, and against any Democrat, no matter how good. This means, in turn, that small things — journalists acting like mean kids in high school, ganging up on candidates they consider uncool, events that suggest fresh scandal even when there’s nothing there — can tip the balance in favor of even the worst candidate imaginable. (Paul Krugman, 9/18) Different Takes: What To Do With CHIP; Deal With Threats To Obamacare Before Single Payer News outlets examine a variety of pressing health policy issues, ranging from the reauthorization of the Children’s Health Insurance Program to what’s next for the Affordable Care Act. “Medicare for all,” or “single-payer,” is becoming a rallying cry for Democrats. This is often accompanied by calls to match the health care coverage of “the rest of the world.” But this overlooks a crucial fact: The “rest of the world” is not all alike. The commonality is universal coverage, but wealthy nations have taken varying approaches to it, some relying heavily on the government (as with single-payer); some relying more on private insurers; others in between. (Aaron E. Carroll and Austin Frakt, 9/18) National Review: Continue To Fund Children’s Health Care, But Coordinate The Programs Better CHIP was a shared vision of Republicans and Democrats alike. It seems like ancient history now, but, in 1997, I joined with members from both sides of the aisle to debate health care policy forcefully but productively. Led by Senators Ted Kennedy (D-MA) and Orrin Hatch (R-UT), we crafted the CHIP language. Bipartisan action, so crucial to the health of the country and the economy, was never more important than when it came to insuring America’s children. Now, two decades later, that progress is in jeopardy. CHIP is set to expire on September 30. (Bill Frist, 9/14) This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. CHIP, which helps states provide health-care coverage to low-income kids, is better structured than Medicaid to ensure that funds are targeted to those who need assistance most. Now, after the Affordable Care Act has created an entitlement to subsidized coverage through the exchange, CHIP-eligible families are often torn between two programs that fit together poorly. If a few minor flaws in its design are fixed, however, CHIP can fill a gap and enhance the rest of America’s health-care safety net. (Chris Pope, 9/18) Thanks to massive grassroots mobilization efforts, our state narrowly averted disaster when Congress failed to pass any version of Affordable Care Act (ACA) repeal that would have restructured Medicaid and left thousands of my constituents without health care coverage. Stopping health care repeal was a huge victory, but the fight is not over yet. Even deeper cuts to Medicaid have been proposed in the 2018 budget resolution, which would slash health care by $1.5 trillion over the next 10 years to pay for billions in tax breaks to the rich and corporations over that same period. (Rep. C.A. “Dutch” Ruppersberger, 9/17) The New York Times: The Best Health Care System In The World: Which One Would You Pick? center_img Baltimore Sun: Medicaid Cuts Shift Burdens To States The New York Times: Complacency Could Kill Health Care Forbes: Children’s Health Insurance Program Demands Quick, Bipartisan Passage The Washington Post: A Century Ago, Women Fought For Access To Contraception. The Trump Administration Threatens To Undo Their Work. The Washington Post: Before Tackling Single-Payer, Save Obamacare Before supporters of universal health coverage get all wrapped up debating a single-payer system, they need to focus on a dire threat to the Affordable Care Act likely to come up for a vote in the Senate before the end of the month. The latest repeal bill is an offering from Republican Sens. Lindsey O. Graham (S.C.) and Bill Cassidy (La.) that would tear apart the existing system and replace it with block grants to the states. Block grants — flows of money for broad purposes with few strings attached — are a patented way to evade hard policy choices. All the tough decisions are kicked down to state capitals, usually with too little money to achieve the ends the block grant is supposed to realize. (E.J. Dionne, 9/17) Trump administration officials vow that they are going to take care of the health of moms and babies. But their pledge to cut funding to Planned Parenthood promises to do the opposite. The proposed cuts have focused not just on the procedure of legal abortion (which is, of course, another column), but also on eliminating access to contraceptives. These proposals ignore a fundamental truth: Access to birth control is central to women’s health. In fact, it always has been. (Lauren MacIvor Thompson, 9/15) last_img read more