Leafs outlast Rebels 7-4 to sweep through exhibition season

first_imgDarnel St. Pierre scored two third period goals to spark the Nelson Leafs to a 7-4 Kootenay International Junior Hockey League exhibition victory over the Castlegar Rebels Wednesday at the NDCC Arena.The win allowed Nelson to finish the preseason undefeated in five games and completed a sweep of the Rebels in the home-and-home series.During the exhibition season Nelson outscored the opposition 31-10. Blair Andrews also scored twice for Nelson with singles coming from Jamie Vlanich, Brandon Sookro and Carsen Willans.Derek Georgopolus, with a pair, Chase Rendin and Quinn Klimchuk replied for Castlegar, which jumped into a 2-0 lead early in the first period.Nelson outshot the Rebels 35-21 with Tyler Moffat and Adam Maida splitting the netminding duties.The two teams open the season Friday in Castlegar as the current KIJHL Champs prepare to defend the 2013 crown. Game time is 7:30 p.m. at the Castlegar Complex.Nelson returns to the NDCC Arena Saturday to meet the Creston Valley Thunder Cats in the team’s home opener.Game time is 7 p.m.last_img read more

Video: the moment Middlesex star Neil Dexter hit six sixes in an over

first_imgFor the 2nd XI @dexy214 has hit 6 6s off the last over, taking him from 63 off 51 to 128 off 69! Incredible scenes!! pic.twitter.com/fz0pOwoMrs— Middlesex Cricket (@Middlesex_CCC) July 6, 2015Captured on camera, this is the moment Middlesex’s Neil Dexter etched his name into club history by smashing six sixes in an over.The former first-team skipper was playing in a second XI game at Bristol when he launched 19-year-old Gloucestershire off-spinner Miles Hammond for consecutive maximums.Dexter was eventually dismissed for 147 off 74 balls as Middlesex posted 381-5 in 44 overs, winning by 56 runs on the Duckworth-Lewis Method.Dexter told West London Sport: “It’s something I’ve never achieved in my life and something I never thought I’d achieve.”Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

From the driveway to the Western Conference Finals, the Currys take center stage

first_imgOAKLAND — Who knows how many times the Curry brothers imagined a moment like this when they were playing one-on-one in the driveway.Perhaps the scenario at hand would have been too surreal for even the wildest of childhood imaginations.With the Warriors and Portland Trail Blazers squaring off in the Western Conference Finals, starting Tuesday night at Oracle Arena, the Currys — Stephen and his younger brother by two-and-a-half-years, Blazers guard Seth — will become the first two brothers to …last_img read more

Do We Really Need 12 Inches of Foam Under Our Slab?

first_img[Editor’s note: Roger and Lynn Normand are building a [no-glossary]Passivhaus[/no-glossary] in Maine. This is the 21st article in a series that will follow their project from planning through construction.] After kicking the tires on the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) results obtained by the Passive House Academy (PHA) on EdgewaterHaus, we have decided to make one design change that, if acceptable to PHA, will save us money and still allow us to comfortably meet the annual heat demand limit set by PHPP.In a northern climate like Maine, the challenge in meeting the Passivhaus standard lies in achieving the exceptionally low annual heat demand (AHD) of 4.75 kBTU/(ft2•yr). As my previous blog noted, EdgewaterHaus design had an annual heat demand of 3.97 kBTU/(ft2•yr) and earned a Passive House Design Stage Assurance. BLOGS BY ROGER NORMAND Seeing Red on a Green Property Appraisal — Part 1Seeing Red on a Green Property Appraisal — Part 2Seeing Red on a Green Property Appraisal — Part 3Can We Get More and Pay Less To Keep About The Same?Backup Electrical Power for a Passivhaus Project?Passive House Certification: Looking Under the Hood Can Foam Insulation Be Too Thick?GBA Encyclopedia: Rigid Foam Insulation Oops! The EPS foam has already been orderedAnd then a complication. Four-inch-thick EPS foam is not a commonly stocked item. To prepare for the start of construction, our builder Caleb Johnson Architects had already ordered the material and its delivery was imminent; according to the supplier, it was too late to modify the order. They would not accept a return. We owned the EPS.How disappointing: after over 1 1/2 years in the design phase of our project, we still could not make all the necessary material decisions in time!Perhaps we could use the 4-inch-thick EPS to substitute for some of the Roxul. From a thermal perspective, that would work. Marc cautioned us to keep the EPS well below grade, because it tends to harbor ants. (Our EPS destined for use well below grade is not treated with an insecticide.) Maybe we can install thinner foamThe first place to look at reducing the cost of the building envelope was the 12 inches of EPS foam insulation below the basement slab, or perhaps some of the Roxul Drainboard insulation outside of the ICF foundation. Both are more expensive than the cellulose insulation used to fill the above-grade wall cavities and blown into the attic, and provide less real insulating benefit. RELATED ARTICLES The Roxul and EPS are installed below grade, where the soil moderates temperature extremes, and wind is not an added burden. Because both are installed as the outermost layer of the building envelope, either could be reduced without significantly affecting the design of the house. And since heat rises and cold falls, common sense suggests that any reduction in insulation happen below ground.The 12 inches of EPS foam was to be installed in 3 layers of 4-inch-thick foam, with taped seams. The foam comes in 4 foot by 8 foot sheets. The EPS costs about $60 per sheet plus tax, tape, and labor. There are some 70 sheets per layer.Our energy analyst Marc Rosenbaum calculated that going from 12 inches of EPS foam down to 8 inches would raise our AHD from 3.97 to 4.35 kBTU/(ft2•yr), still comfortably below the 4.75 kBTU/(ft2•yr) ceiling.So, let’s eliminate one of the three layers of EPS. If you want that type of Roxul, you have to buy a palletAnother complication: the planned 2 3/8-inch-thick Roxul Drainboard is also not commonly stocked, and unlike the 1-inch-thick version, only comes in pallet-sized quantities. We would also have to match exterior material thicknesses.Then our architect Chris Briley learned that we may be able to purchase some surplus 2 3/8 inch Roxul retained by another nearby contractor — price to be determined. Chris has drafted a revised drawing showing the reduced amount of Roxul, the EPS topped with flashing to prevent water from the above drainboard to flow between the EPS and the ICF, and the change to only 8 inches of EPS beneath the slab.Before we implement this design change, Chris has submitted the revised drawing to PHA. We want PHA to confirm that we still meet the Passivhaus annual heat demand limit, and still retain the Passive House Design Stage Assurance. We expect a quick response from PHA, as excavation is imminent. The first article in this series was Kicking the Tires on a Passivhaus Project. Roger Normand’s construction blog is called EdgewaterHaus.last_img read more

10 months agoEverton plan bids for Bournemouth striker Wilson, Batshuayi

first_imgEverton plan bids for Bournemouth striker Wilson, Batshuayiby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveEverton are aiming for a busy January market.The Daily Express says manager Marco Silva has been forced to utilise Richarlison up front, with Cenk Tosun and Oumar Niasse not trusted to lead the line.And director of football Marcel Brands wants to secure another goal-getter’s signature in the new year.Callum Wilson has been lined up after impressing at Bournemouth.While Chelsea striker Michy Batshuayi is on Everton’s radar too with his loan spell at Valencia potentially set to be cancelled. TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Photo: An Alabama Fan Got An Auburn Recruit’s Phone Number, Is Harassing Him About Flipping To The Crimson Tide

first_imgAlabama Crimson Tide fans react in the second half of the AllState Sugar Bowl against the Clemson Tigers at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome.NEW ORLEANS, LA – JANUARY 01: Alabama Crimson Tide fans react in the second half of the AllState Sugar Bowl against the Clemson Tigers at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome on January 1, 2018 in New Orleans, Louisiana. (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)If you’re a college football fan – or, really, anyone who is not a coach – and you’re thinking about contacting a recruit, just stop. Don’t do it. Whether you’re simply trying to encourage a recruit to come to your school or berating a prospect for committing elsewhere, you’re 99 percent of the time going to come off in ill form to the 17-or-18-year-old high schooler. The following Alabama fan is someone who, unfortunately, does not follow the advice previously stated. This person somehow got the phone number of four-star linebacker Darrell Williams, an Auburn commit, and proceeded to text him about the Crimson Tide. AuburnRecruitScreenShotWe realize you’re passionate about your college football teams, people, and that’s why we love you, but please, don’t ever text a recruit.last_img read more

Texas Coach Vance Bedford Goes On Rant About Tradition When Asked About Alternate Uniforms

first_imgThe Texas Longhorns football team running onto the field.STILLWATER, OK – OCTOBER 29: The Texas Longhorns run onto the field before a game against the Oklahoma State Cowboys October 29, 2005 at Boone Pickens Stadium in Stillwater, Oklahoma. (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)Last weekend against Kansas, Texas honored safety Freddie Steinmark, subject of the upcoming film My All-American, by wearing 1969 throwback uniforms.Texas wearing throwback uniforms as tribute to Freddie Steinmark. (via @Uniformswag) pic.twitter.com/YVnQnacZN0— ESPN CollegeFootball (@ESPNCFB) November 8, 2015Texas is a program with a classic look that rarely veers from what works, but most were probably okay with these clean-looking throwbacks. When asked about other alternate uniforms that some teams go to, defensive coordinator Vance Bedford went on a long rant about traditional powers in college football, that many fans who don’t like wild uniforms will appreciate.Asked Texas DC Vance Bedford about alternate unis today. His 600-word answer addressed a whole lot more. pic.twitter.com/q2mdv5UVkp— Max Olson (@max_olson) November 11, 2015We don’t think Bedford will be looking for a job at Oregon any time soon.last_img read more

Court martial for racial slur striking superior begins at NS base

first_imgKENTVILLE, N.S. – A Nova Scotia court martial heard contrasting views from witnesses Monday on whether a white reservist’s use of the word “nappy” to describe a black co-worker’s hair was intended as a racial slur.Cpl. Garett Rollman pleaded not guilty Monday to a charge of striking his superior officer on the hand and two charges of “conduct to the prejudice of good order and discipline.”Prosecutors said Rollman made an inappropriate comment to civilian worker Cheryl Richard about black hair styles in a kitchen at the military base in Aldershot, N.S., in late February 2016.Richard said Monday her co-worker told her about a video that he’d viewed where a black woman was sponging her hair due to it being “nappy.”“I said, ‘Excuse me,’ and he said, ‘Nappy hair, you know like yours,’” she said, adding she immediately left the area, upset by the comment.Richard testified the term is “a racial slur they used a long time ago saying that black people have knotty hair because they didn’t have the means of working with their hair. It’s a racial slur that white people use.”However, Sgt. Christopher Jones, the senior non-commissioned officer in the unit, testified that as a black man and a supervisor of the two workers, he didn’t believe that Rollman was using the term as a slur.Jones said he believed Rollman had been explaining in a pleasant way that he and his black girlfriend had been watching a program about hair styles, and Rollman may not have understood Richard was offended by his description of what he saw.“He was trying to explain something nice … because nappy hair means style,” Jones testified, adding the term can have various meanings in different contexts.He said that Richard had a long-standing conflict with Rollman, to the point where the two were assigned to work on separate shifts for several years, and he testified Richard had taken the opportunity to “go after him (Rollman).”The prosecution alleged that the following day Rollman was standing near Richard when he pushed a garbage container across the kitchen and shouted insults and profanities at her.Richard testified she went from the kitchen area to a room where Sgt. Earl Smith — the second in command of the area — was sitting and told him about the incident.The prosecution alleges that Smith stood up, and “Cpl. Rollman hit the sergeant’s hand out of the way and took up a boxer’s stance,” before more yelling ensued and Rollman left Smith’s office.Sharon Angel, another civilian employee, testified Monday she witnessed Rollman and Smith yelling, and she saw Rollman raise his hand.She said she heard Smith yell, “Don’t you hit me!” but she couldn’t see if Rollman actually struck his superior.Capt. Greg Moorehead, the military prosecutor, told the court during his opening statement that Rollman’s behaviour breached military law.“None of this behaviour is acceptable, your honour, particularly in a disciplined and professional military,” he said.During defence cross examination, Richard told the court that she had “sometimes” complained about Rollman’s behaviour in the past, and confirmed he had launched a workplace harassment complaint against her prior to the incident.During opening statements, military defence lawyer Lt.-Cmdr. Brent Walden had asked for the case to be adjourned. He said the court needed time to find Smith, who has left the military and hasn’t responded to emails from the prosecution requesting his presence.The presiding military judge ruled that the case could proceed, noting a week has been set aside for the case.However, she also took note of the defence’s concerns over the absence of a key witness in the case.Follow (at)mtuttoncporg on Twitter.last_img read more

How one Canadian investment company is chasing Oscars with top Hollywood stars

first_imgTORONTO — Jason Cloth still remembers the night his biggest shot at Oscar glory slipped out of his hands.The Toronto-based financier had just finished celebrating his 2016 film “The Birth of a Nation” at a dinner party with director Nate Parker. The slave uprising drama was receiving warm reviews, secured a major distribution deal with Fox Searchlight and seemed positioned to collect armfuls of trophies during awards season.Heading back to his hotel room, Cloth was feeling optimistic — until Aaron Gilbert, his partner at Creative Wealth Media called him to break the news.Industry trade Variety was set to publish a story that dove into the details of a 1999 rape case, in which Parker was acquitted, that also involved the film’s co-writer Jean Celestin. They were students at Penn State University at the time, and while Celestin was initially found guilty of sexual assault, his conviction was overturned when the accuser declined to testify for a retrial. The woman committed suicide in 2012.Even before the #MeToo movement put sexual assault under the microscope in Hollywood, Parker’s involvement wasn’t a good look for the film. He didn’t just direct the movie, he played the main character, who leads an uprising motivated by the rape of his wife. Any prospects for “The Birth of a Nation” were quashed before it hit theatres that October.“That was our lightning in a bottle,” Cloth says while sipping water at his downtown Toronto office, where he brokers Hollywood deals using Canadian funds.“It killed us. I’ve never seen a film go from what should’ve been a best picture winner to not even an Indie Spirit Award nomination.”While Creative Wealth Media and its partner Bron Studios didn’t lose money on the production, since Fox bought the film’s rights, Cloth says it was a crash course in Hollywood business. Sometimes a film’s best ingredients can become a significant risk somewhere between the script stage and final cut.But that doesn’t mean he regrets the investment.“If the same parameters came up, I would still take that film,” Cloth insists.He says the experience taught him it’s crucial to perform a thorough background check on talent involved in each project.“If there’s ghosts in the closet, we want to know about it,” he says. “If there’s rumours, we’d rather walk.”The dust kicked up by “The Birth of a Nation” helped Cloth establish his company as a calculated risk taker interested in making prestige films.What makes Creative Wealth Media unique is that it’s backing Hollywood productions largely with Canadian money. Pension plans, mutual fund operators and the country’s highest net worth families are some of the key investors getting behind indie films with trusted stars attached.Denzel Washington brought two of his movies — “Fences” and “Roman J. Israel, Esq.” — to the Canadian financier and wound up picking up several Oscar nods, including two for himself and a best supporting actress win for Viola Davis.This year, Cloth hopes he’s sitting on another Oscar winner with “The Front Runner,” a biopic about American senator Gary Hart and a presidential campaign that was derailed by his extra-marital affair. Hugh Jackman is gathering buzz for his role as the senator in the Jason Reitman film, which opens Friday in Toronto and Vancouver.“If ‘Front Runner’ works we will be a three-year in a row Oscar-nominated production company,” Cloth boasts.But if it doesn’t work, Creative Wealth Management will move onto the next project. They’ve invested nearly US$200 million in production this year on movies like “The Spy Who Dumped Me,” with Mila Kunis and Kate McKinnon, and the ultra-violent feminist action flick “Assassination Nation.”Next year, they’ve lined up US$500 million in film and TV financing that includes an untitled morning show drama produced and starring Reese Witherspoon for Apple’s streaming service, and “Fonzo,” an Oscar bait drama with Tom Hardy as Al Capone.Cloth says his company enticed Hardy to work on “Fonzo” with the same strategy that worked for Jackman on “Front Runner.” His business partner Gilbert promised both actors they were playing roles of a lifetime — the kind of parts that win Oscars.Those assurances got Jackman and Hardy so excited they agreed to scale back their usual pay grade to “nowhere near what their normal rate is,” he says. The cheaper movies lowered the risk and boosted the upside for everyone involved.It helps that Cloth has a proven track record for spotting potential.Nearly a decade ago, he met two Ottawa-raised entertainment managers seeking a loan to get their silky-voiced singer the Weeknd started. Nobody knew the artist, born Abel Tesfaye, but the managers were certain they represented a future superstar.A few years later, a lawyer friend suggested Cloth wade into the film industry by supporting an independent movie that saw its key investor pull out at the 11th hour before production. The experience opened Cloth’s eyes to a new world of growth.“It’s an industry that has almost no volatility,” he says.“What other industry (exists where) a drop in economic activity has almost no bearing on your business? Nothing touches film and television.”But not every movie delivers on its promise.Creative Wealth Media’s first few projects were Canadian films “Into the Forest” and “Hyena Road.” While they didn’t lose money, he says he didn’t consider either “financially successful.”Cloth says he’s become more attuned to audience tastes — a mystery that most film executives constantly struggle to understand.“(We) are really careful to ensure we have within our slate a female-centric film and actors with ethnic diversity,” Cloth says as an example.But he acknowledges that his company is still tied to projects with uncertain futures.Luc Besson’s upcoming film “Anna” is one of them, he says. Creative Wealth Media signed on as a co-finance partner before Besson was accused of rape by an actress earlier this year.And while the case is being investigated by French authorities — and the director denies any wrongdoing — the uncertainty throws the film’s prospects into question.“That one worries me,” Cloth says of the film, set for release next year.“There’s very little we can do to protect against that, other than try and work with established filmmakers that have this open history that we can check.”Follow @dfriend on Twitter.David Friend, The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Federal Court of Appeal to release decision on Trans Mountain next week

first_imgVANCOUVER, B.C. – The Federal Court of Appeal is scheduled to release its decision next week in a case that combined nearly two dozen lawsuits calling for the National Energy Board’s review of the Trans Mountain pipeline to be overturned.The board, Trans Mountain and the federal government defended the project as viable during two weeks of hearings in Vancouver last fall.First Nations, including the Tsleil-Waututh, argued the federal government did not adequately consult them, although federal lawyers told the hearings extensive consultations were conducted. Environmental groups and the cities of Vancouver and Burnaby also challenged the project and were supported by the province of British Columbia, which was an intervener in the case.Alberta was also an intervener and a lawyer for the province said Ottawa’s decision to approve the expansion of the pipeline between Edmonton and Metro Vancouver was based on a broad base of evidence that considered environmental, economic and Indigenous interests.The federal government announced in May that it was buying the Trans Mountain pipeline for $4.5 billion to ensure what it calls a vital piece of infrastructure is built.The Federal Court of Appeal tweeted Friday that the decision would be released next Thursday on its website.(The Canadian Press)last_img read more