Men’s soccer on the rise

first_imgSophomore Joey Tennyson leads the Badgers with three goals off of seven shots-on-goal through only five of the team’s seven games so far this season. Tennyson had only three goals last season, second to fellow sophomore Chris Prince who had seven goals.[/media-credit]After a disappointing finish in 2010, head coach John Trask and the Wisconsin men’s soccer team set out to improve early this season.Following last year’s 4-13-3 finish, Trask and his young team are already noticing improvements. Coming off of an unbeaten weekend at Flames Field in Chicago, the Badgers now boast a 3-3-1 record through their first seven games of the season.“We’re improving, and I’m pretty pleased with where we’re at,” Trask said of his young team. “[But] have we really arrived? No. We’re a team coming off a four-win season. We’ve got to find a way to get some positive results, and hopefully we can push this thing forward.”Last year’s team, which lost to eventual national semifinalist Michigan in the Big Ten tournament, was Trask’s first at UW. After winning two Horizon League regular season titles, the 2007 Horizon League Tournament and two Horizon League Coach of the Year titles with Illinois at Chicago, Trask came to Madison with a new attitude and a notoriously ferocious defense.This year, sophomore goalkeepers Ciro Martinez and Max Jentsch have held opponents to one goal or fewer in four games, in which the Badgers are 3-0-1. The Badgers’ solid defense, at times coupled with stellar goalkeeping and steady offense, has propelled them to the best start they have had in the last few years. After closing last year 3-2-1, all signs point to success in the near future for Trask’s young team.Sophomore forward Chris Prince led the team in scoring with seven goals and 14 points last year and netted his second goal of this season Sunday against Southern Illinois University Edwardsville. Sophomore midfielder Joey Tennyson has three goals on the year, including one last weekend, and sophomore midfielders Nick Janus and Trevor Wheeler each have one, meaning the sophomore class has accounted for seven of the team’s 11 goals thus far.“Even though we’re a young team, we had seven freshmen starting last year, so they got a good 15 games under their belt,” Prince said.“Most of our young players did get a lot of experience last year, so that’s going to help us out a lot,” Tennyson added.The three Badger losses this season have come from Virginia, California-Irvine and Memphis – all schools that received votes to be ranked in the most recent NCAA coaches’ poll. The Badgers had chances to win all three of the games, but silly mistakes led to missed opportunities. Tennyson, who currently leads the team in goals, said he feels that consistently eliminating mistakes like the ones already committed would take the team to the level at which they want to perform.Evidence of the Badgers’ work was shown last weekend, when scoring three unanswered goals to start the game against previously 4-1-1 Drake University proved to be enough to win 3-1 Friday. During the second game of the weekend doubleheader, the Badgers tied a scrappy SIU Edwardsville team, 1-1. The game was scoreless until the 83rd minute, when Prince put the Badgers on top for two minutes before the Cougars’ Derek Huffman scored the equalizer three minutes later.By completing a weekend doubleheader without a loss, the Badgers showed improvement from the previous two weekends, during which they compiled a 1-3 record.The Badgers now move on to a four game homestand on Sunday, beginning with Loyola Marymount, a team with a 2-4-0 record out of the West Cost Conference. The Lions lost a close game to University of California Los Angeles earlier this season, having to play 77 minutes with 10 men. After LMU, the Badgers have a tough stretch that includes games against Indiana, Creighton, Michigan and Michigan State. The Hoosiers, Bluejays and Spartans will all face the Badgers at the McClimon Complex.With the Big Ten opener against Indiana Oct. 2 at the McClimon Complex, Trask and the Badgers hope to have improved in all areas, as some are speculating the Big Ten title will come down to the Badgers and Hoosiers this year.“It’s either us or Indiana, I think, that should finish on top in the Big Ten, and hopefully we should be able to make the NCAA Tournament, too. I don’t think there’s a reason why we shouldn’t,” Prince said.The Badgers have everything they need to succeed – a nationally renowned coaching staff, young talent, veteran leadership and an opportunity for a much improved year. Where there is any possible doubt, Trask shows full confidence in his team.“Are we as experienced? No,” Trask said. “But I’d also say that we’re pretty darn good, so that should not be a hindrance going forward.”last_img read more

BGC commits £10m to fund GamCare & YGAM’s education support programme

first_img Related Articles UK gambling adopts toughest online advertising code to protect underage audiences August 27, 2020 Strengthening its safer gambling mandate, the Betting and Gaming Council (BGC) has confirmed the launch of a new £10 million funded ‘education and support programme’ across the UK.The learning programme, co-developed by GamCare and YGAM, is seeking to educate 11-19 year olds on problem gambling awareness, addictive behaviours and the real-life consequences of gambling addiction.The BGC explained that the independent education programme will be delivered by the two charities, with licensed incumbents solely contributing to its funding which will be collected and distributed by the  Charities Aid Foundation.Michael Dugher – BGCThe launch will see the BGC deliver on a key pledge of its founding commitments announced last November, in which it highlighted educational support as a fundamental goal.“As the new standards body representing most of the regulated industry, the BGC is delighted to be supporting this fantastic initiative,” said Michael Dugher, Chief Executive of the BGC.“Educating our young people is vital if we are to ensure that they are better informed and fully aware of the potential risks. It’s also essential that those who are teaching them are fully trained and able to look out for the tell-tale signs of any gambling-related harm and how to access help if required.”Founding objectives established by GamCare and YGAM aim to directly educate 120,000 UK youngsters. In addition, the programme aims to train 100,000 professionals delivering support to teachers, youth workers, community stakeholders and mental health practitioners.Lee Willows – YGAMGamCare and YGAM staff will be supported with a full range of educational materials, in accordance with PSHE Association, City and Guilds and Pearson quality standards.Lee Willows, founder and CEO of YGAM, said: “Building upon our five-year track record of training professionals who have influence over young people’s learning, we are delighted to be working with GamCare, the BGC and their members and our various external evaluation partners to scale our geographical reach to deliver this ambitious programme.“By training professionals who have influence over young people’s learning, we will equip these professionals with the skills, knowledge and confidence to not only deliver the programme but also highlight the age-appropriate support available from GamCare.”In the statement, GamCare and YGAM set out the following ‘shared aspirations’ for gambling education in the UK:All 11-19 year-olds in England, Wales and Northern Ireland receive at least one session of gambling awareness education during their secondary/further educationAll teachers, youth workers and other professionals working with young people should have access to information about the risks of gambling, how to identify gambling-related harm in young people and where help can be soughtAll parents and families should have access to information about young people’s gambling, how to keep young people safe, and where they can be referred for help and supportAll young people (aged 18 and under) who are ‘at risk’ of or have developed a problem with gambling, or are affected by the gambling of someone close to them (e.g. a parent), should have access to age-appropriate treatment.Launching during national lockdown, GamCare and YGAM have ensured that programme resources will be made further available via video link-up.Anna Hemmings – GamCareYoungsters identified through the programme as being impacted by gambling-related harm will be able to receive seamless access to help and support from GamCare staff and via its Youth facing website– ‘BigDeal’.Commenting on the launch, Anna Hemmings, CEO of GamCare, said: “GamCare have been working with young people and youth facing professionals to deliver gambling education for many years. What we see in the classroom tends to be polarised views on gambling, and a lack of clear understanding about its potential risks. We are delighted to be working with YGAM and extending this much needed programme.“We believe that gambling education should have parity with education around other risky behaviours and the extension of this programme will help us take a significant step towards achieving that aim.” Submit Share Share StumbleUpon ASA monitoring sweep marks gambling as the worst underage advertising offender August 26, 2020 UKGC launches fourth National Lottery licence competition August 28, 2020last_img read more