Cleaner stabbed during robbery in Sophia

first_imgA 26-year-old cleaner of B Field, Sophia, Greater Georgetown was on Sunday stabbed twice during a robbery in the vicinity of the Sophia Health Centre.Devon Joe was stabbed to his abdomen by two men, one of whom was armed with a knife. They also relieved him of a mobile phone.Based on reports received, the victim was in the street speaking on his mobile phone when the two suspects approached him.One of them, according to the Police, whipped out a knife and demanded that the victim hand over the cellular phone, but he refused.The suspect proceeded to stab the VC twice, thus resulting in him falling to the ground. It was at this time, he grabbed the mobile phone and fled the scene. The injured man was picked up by public-spirited persons and taken to the Georgetown Public Hospital, where he was admitted. His condition is listed as stable.The Police were contacted, and an investigation was launched. No arrests were made.last_img read more

CAOIMHE MCKNIGHTCONCERN OVER SELLING OF RUNAROUND

first_img CAOIMHE MCKNIGHTCONCERN OVER SELLING OF RUNAROUND CARS – MCKNIGHTSinn Fein SINN Féin Councillor for the Galliagh area Caoimhe McKnight has called for car owners to be more responsible when they are selling on second hand cars.She was speaking after two more cars were burned out in the Galliagh area this weekSpeaking to the Journal Councillor Caoimhe McKnight said:“What happens on many occasions is once those driving about in these run-around cars think they have been spotted by police they get rid of the car as soon as possible with Galliagh unfortunately being the area of choice.“I am calling on anyone who is selling a car to be more vigilant , especially if they are being sold cheaply, in the region of a couple of hundred pounds. “They should check the age of the buyers and question if they believe the car is been genuinely bought to be driven safely and legally or if this person may have ulterior motives for buying it.“The community is plagued by this kind of anti-community behaviour and death driving through the area and residents should not have to put up with it.“It is only a matter of time before someone is seriously injured or killed with these death drivers and there is also concerns about the fire hazard of burning out the cars.“It takes time, money and resources of not only the emergency services and the police but also of the local Council workers to carry out clean ups. “This money could be better spent in helping develop the community for everyone to enjoy,” she added.CONCERN OVER SELLING OF RUNAROUND CARS – MCKNIGHT was last modified: October 27th, 2017 by John2John2 Tags: ShareTweetlast_img read more

Case Comprehensive Cancer Center wins NIH grant to study health disparities

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 19 2018The Case Comprehensive Cancer Center has received a three-year, $3,194,947 grant from the National Cancer Institute to investigate colorectal and breast cancer health disparities. The grant is one of only four Specialized Programs of Research Excellence (SPORE) Planning Grant P20 awards given across the nation to address health disparities. It will provide the infrastructure for a new, comprehensive research program at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine to study cancer health disparities at both molecular and population levels.The new Cancer Disparities SPORE P20 program will examine racial differences in the development of colorectal and breast cancer–two leading causes of cancer death in the United States. The overarching goal of the program is to identify people at high risk for each cancer, and find common factors that drive racial disparities.In their first project, researchers will use risk-assessment strategies to reveal genetic, lifestyle, and community factors associated with colorectal cancer across demographics. The second project will apply systems biology approaches to decode molecular mechanisms underlying racial disparities in triple negative breast cancer, including evaluating differences in treatment responses and survival. Both projects will integrate basic science research in cancer tissue samples with broader, population-based studies. Additional projects in development seek to understand relations between community-based factors and disparities in other cancers, including prostate and uterine.”Racial disparities in these cancers persist, and are widening,” said Nathan A. Berger, MD, Hanna-Payne Professor of Experimental Medicine and director of the Center for Science, Health and Society at Case Western Reserve School of Medicine. “This award is an opportunity to investigate several causes and consequences of these disparities.”Berger is one of three principal investigators who will lead the program. The other Multiple Principal Investigators include Li Li, MD, PhD, Mary Ann Swetland Professor of Environmental Health Sciences and associate director of Prevention Research at Case Comprehensive Cancer Center; and Monica Webb Hooper, PhD, professor at Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, and associate director of Cancer Disparities Research at Case Comprehensive Cancer Center. Additional lead investigators in this interdisciplinary translational program include: Vinay Varadan, PhD, Cynthia Owusu, MD, MSc, and William Schiemann, PhD, co-leaders of the Breast Cancer Project; Claudia Coulton, PhD, who together with Li lead the Colon Cancer Project; and Joe Willis, MD, who directs the Biospecimen Core.Related StoriesTrends in colonoscopy rates not aligned with increase in early onset colorectal cancerLiving with advanced breast cancerNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancerThe research program could identify genetic biomarkers for cancer that are specific to high-risk populations. It may also help explain why some populations are more likely to develop certain types of cancer, and factors that contribute most to cancer survival. Said Webb Hooper, “We are studying populations who have an undue burden of cancer. Our science has the potential to add to the body of knowledge around cancer disparities, and lead to treatments that benefit communities.”Added Li, “With a better understanding of factors affecting cancer disparities, we can promote medical and social policies that benefit specific populations.”SPORE awards were established by the National Cancer Institute in 1992 to promote collaborative, interdisciplinary, translational cancer research. The award to Li, Webb Hooper, and Berger is only the second SPORE given to Case Western Reserve. The first was awarded in 2011 to Sandy Markowitz, MD, PhD, to study gastrointestinal cancers.”This new SPORE P20 award promotes translational research that integrates population studies with cutting-edge basic science. We are hopeful it will help delineate biological mechanisms underlying racial disparities, so we can ultimately reduce or eliminate them altogether,” said Li. Source:http://casemed.case.edu/cwrumed360/news-releases/release.cfm?news_id=1514&news_category=8last_img read more

Surprising discovery offers clues to limit graftvshost disease

first_img Source:https://labblog.uofmhealth.org/lab-report/a-proteins-surprising-role-offers-clues-to-limit-graft-vs-host-disease Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Mar 22 2019A protein that protects people with inflammatory bowel disease has quite a different effect in graft-vs.-host disease, a common and challenging side effect of bone marrow transplants.In a surprising finding, researchers at the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center showed the protein NLRP6 aggravated the difficult symptoms of gastrointestinal graft-vs.-host disease. Knocking out this protein in mice led to significantly better survival and less severe GVHD.Graft-vs.-host disease, a response to the donor bone marrow, causes symptoms similar to ulcerative colitis, including diarrhea and abdominal pain. Generally, the mechanisms that cause colitis overlap with those that cause GVHD, and many of the treatments are similar.Studies have shown NLRP6 lessens symptoms in colitis. So when researchers looked at NLRP6’s impact on graft-vs.-host disease, they assumed it would also be protective.”There are a lot of reasons NLRP6 seemed to work well in those other diseases, but in the case of GVHD, it seemed to do the opposite. In mice where we knocked out NLRP6, instead of doing worse, they did better. That was a big surprise,” says co-senior study authors, Pavan Reddy, M.D., deputy director of the Rogel Cancer Center and division chief of hematology/oncology at Michigan Medicine.In their study, published in Nature Microbiology, the team compared mouse models expressing NLRP6 and those in which the protein was eliminated. In both models, the mice had undergone a bone marrow transplant.The second surprise was that NLRP6 played a role that was not dependent on microbiome composition. Previous data had suggested NLRP6’s protective role is directly related to the microbes within the intestinal tract: the more good microbes, the more protective effect.In this study, researchers measured the levels of various microbes, then worked to alter the microbiome, wiping out certain microbes or breeding mice together to share their microbiome. They developed mice in a germ-free environment and then exposed them to a microbiome with and without NLRP6. Each time, those without NLRP6 had better outcomes.Related StoriesStudy reveals how protein mutation is involved in Christianson syndromeVirus killing protein could be the real antiviral hero finds studyHinge-like protein may unlock new pathways for cystic fibrosis treatment”Even when we did all of those manipulations, the protection was still there in the NLRP6-knockout mice. The composition of the microbiome does not seem to matter, unlike with other disease processes,” says study author Hideaki Fujiwara, M.D., Ph.D., a post-doctoral researcher in Reddy’s lab.Digging deeper, researchers found a metabolite called taurine that appears to be, in part, responsible for turning on NLRP6 and ultimately making GVHD worse. Changes in the microbiome can lead to excess taurine, which signals NLRP6, which in turn triggers GVHD.”Just measuring changes in the microbiome is not always sufficient. We have to look at what specifically changes and the consequences of those changes. A change that leads to the generation of metabolites like taurine or other proteins or enzymes will need to be understood to comprehend the effects of the microbiome on GVHD,” says co-senior author Grace Chen, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of hematology/oncology at Michigan Medicine.”Conceptually, if we can target this protein and block NLRP6, we can mitigate intestinal GVHD. Or, if you look at it the other way, changing the diet or microbiome to avoid an excessive amount of taurine could be another way to reduce GVHD,” Reddy says.NLRP6 is expressed in gut cells but not in the tumor cells the researchers studied. This means the bone marrow transplant could do its job to eliminate the tumor. In principle, blocking NLRP6 could limit GVHD without limiting the transplant’s anti-tumor effect.Reddy notes that no blocker currently exists against NLRP6 and any potential clinical benefit still needs to be explored. His lab plans to follow up with more study of taurine and other metabolites, including how modifying them impacts NLRP6 and GVHD.last_img read more

GM Trump tariffs driving up costs

first_imgGeneral Motors CEO Mary Barra said it is too eary to tell the full extent of the impact of punitive tariffs on metals, but the company is seeing rising prices Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. US President Donald Trump’s harsh tariffs on steel and aluminum are increasing costs for US auto giant General Motors but the company is examining the fallout, GM’s chief executive said Tuesday. “Clearly we want to maintain affordability in vehicles. We are seeing cost increases,” CEO Mary Barra told reporters ahead of the company’s annual shareholder meeting.”We’re working hard to understand the impact” of the tariffs, she said noting it was too early to tell for sure as there are “a lot of moving pieces in trade and the auto industry is a very complex business.”Barra also said negotiations to revamp the North American Free Trade Agreement, the premise for the continent’s integrated auto supply chain, were incomplete, meaning the outlook was uncertain.Trump last month allowed punishing border taxes of 25 percent on steel and 10 percent on aluminum to take effect for America’s largest suppliers, prompting retaliation from Canada, Europe and Mexico.The NAFTA talks have been hung up on the US demand to increase the US-made content in autos that receive duty-free treatment.The Institute for Supply Management reported this month that the tariffs and threatened counter-measures already were jacking up metals prices, causing supply interruptions and order backlogs.The White House is also considering tariffs on imported autos, which would throw a wrench in hundreds of billions of dollars in annual cross-border trade.Barra said despite the trade uncertainty, the company so far had not had to shift course for the longer-term.”We haven’t been in a position where we have had to change our plans,” she said.center_img © 2018 AFP US tariffs on car imports are a double-edged sword Citation: GM: Trump tariffs driving up costs (2018, June 12) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-06-gm-trump-tariffs.htmllast_img read more

5G presents security challenge for telecom operators

first_img “Nothing will ever be 100 percent secure” Explore further © 2019 AFP “Operators are moving from a hardware system to a virtualised and fully automated one,” said Darren Anstee, technology director at Netscout, which provides software for networks.”Security is about visibility, when you can’t see everything on your network, this is when you have a problem,” he added. Citation: 5G presents security challenge for telecom operators (2019, February 28) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-02-5g-telecom.html But a study by the University of Lorraine in France found that the new wireless network still contains some security holes which were already present in previous networks, 3G and 4G.5G offers “improved data protection when compared to the previous wireless norms” but “flaws persist and the weaknesses that have been identified” could allow “several cyberattacks and have an impact on the protection of privacy,” it said.Experts say the architecture of 5G networks also presents entirely new security challenges.Fifth generation wireless networks use “network virtualisation”, which refers to moving some resources which have traditionally been delivered in physical hardware to a virtual software-based network.It is designed to allow the network to make better use of data transfer rates and provide more flexibility to 5G networks. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Nothing 100% secure5G allows for the available bandwidth to be split up into channels, each of which is independent from others and can be separately secured, which some experts say can help boost security.”We can create a kind of micro-networks, with different levels of security. The idea is to compartmentalise the network according to different uses,” said Laurent Boutet, a systems engineer at US computer networking company F5Network.Mobile communications industry body GSMA, which stages the Mobile World Congress, estimates the number of connected devices will triple to 25 billion by 2025.For Dexter Thillien, an analysts at Fitch Solutions, the main challenge for security is this rise in the “number of entry points, considering the exponential number of objects which will be connected.””From the point of view of security, the network itself is secondary,” he said.”You have to keep in mind that nothing will ever be 100 percent secure. We still don’t have a precise idea of how billions or even trillions of connected objects could affect networks, it is still unknown at this point,” said Thillien. Uses for the lightning-fast 5G network will be virtually limitless and include autonomous cars While Washington’s concerns that future 5G wireless networks could be vulnerable to spying by China have dominated headlines, businesses have long been pushing to make sure the technology is as secure as possible. Huawei takes fight with US over spying fears to top mobile fair With fifth-generation wireless networks, or 5G, starting to be rolled out this year, the issue of 5G security was in focus at the Mobile World Congress trade fair which got under way Monday in Barcelona.Unlike upgrades of wireless networks in the past, 5G will deliver not just faster phone and computer data but also help connect up cars, appliances, cargo and crop equipment.Washington has warned that allowing Chinese firms like Huawei to provide the equipment to build 5G networks could leave them vulnerable to spying on the part of China but this is only one of the risks.5G’s much faster speeds, vast data capacity and lower latency—or response time—are expected to underpin entirely new technologies such as self-driving cars and telemedicine—which in turn may attract cyberintrusions by criminals or terrorists.”There will be more data which will be transferred…it is clear that security is much more complicated,” said Yannick Sadowy, the director for telecoms and media at consulting firm Accenture.Mathieu Lagrange, who is responsible for internet security at com institute, said the risks to 5G’s security “were taken into account” when the norms for the technology were established. 5G may just to be too complex to protect it from all attemps at interferencelast_img read more

What Is Homeostasis

first_imgHomeostasis is the ability to maintain a relatively stable internal state that persists despite changes in the world outside. All living organisms, from plants to puppies to people, must regulate their internal environment to process energy and ultimately survive. If your blood pressure skyrockets or body temperature plummets, for example, your organ systems may struggle to do their jobs and eventually fail. Why homeostasis is important Physiologist Walter Cannon coined the term “homeostasis” in the 1920s, expanding on previous work by late physiologist Claude Bernard. In the 1870s, Bernard described how complex organisms must maintain balance in their internal environment, or “milieu intérieur,” in order to lead a “free and independent life” in the world beyond. Cannon honed the concept, and introduced homeostasis to popular audiences through his book, “The Wisdom of the Body” (The British Medical Journal, 1932). [The 7 Biggest Mysteries of the Human Body] Hailed as a core tenet of physiology, Cannon’s basic definition of homeostasis remains in use today. The term derives from Greek roots meaning “similar” and “a state of stability.” The prefix “homeo” stresses that homeostasis doesn’t work like a thermostat or cruise control in a car, fixed at one precise temperature or speed. Instead, homeostasis holds important physiological factors within an acceptable range of values, according to a review in the journal Appetite.Advertisement The human body, for example, regulates its internal concentrations of hydrogen, calcium, potassium and sodium, charged particles that cells rely on for normal function. Homeostatic processes also maintain water, oxygen, pH and blood sugar levels, as well as core body temperature, according to a 2015 review in Advances in Physiology Education. In healthy organisms, homeostatic processes unfold constantly and automatically, according to Scientific American. Multiple systems often work in tandem to hold steady a single physiological factor, like body temperature. If these measures falter or fail, an organism may succumb to disease, or even death. Toucan’s Bill Doubles as RadiatorHeat-sensing video shows how the toucan’s bill radiates heat to reduce the bird’s body temperature when asleep.Volume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Better Bug Sprays?01:33 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65938-homeostasis.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:4800:48Your Recommended Playlist01:33Better Bug Sprays?01:08Why Do French Fries Taste So Bad When They’re Cold?04:24Sperm Whale Befriends Underwater Robot00:29Robot Jumps Like a Grasshopper, Rolls Like a Ball00:29Video – Giggly Robot02:31Surgical Robotics关闭  Check out helpful graphics about homeostasis from the Khan Academy. Watch this video from the Amoeba Sisters to learn more about negative feedback. Keeping information flowing Homeostatic systems may have primarily evolved to help organisms maintain optimal function in different environments and situations. But, according to a 2013 essay in the journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution, some scientists theorize that homeostasis primarily provides a “quiet background” for cells, tissues and organs to communicate with each other. The theory posits that homeostasis makes it easier for organisms to extract important information from the environment and shuttle signals between body parts. Regardless of its evolutionary purpose, homeostasis has shaped research in the life sciences for nearly a century. Though mostly discussed in the context of animal physiology, homeostatic processes also enable plants to manage energy stores, nourish cells and respond to environmental challenges. Beyond biology, the social sciences, cybernetics, computer science and engineering all use homeostasis as a framework to understand how people and machines maintain stability despite disruptions. Additional resources:by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 minute and see why everyone is addictedVikings: Free Online GameUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoYahoo SearchYou’ve Never Seen Luxury Like This On A Cruise Ship. Search Luxury Mediterranean CruisesYahoo SearchUndoKelley Blue Book2019 Lexus Vehicles Worth Buying for Their Resale ValueKelley Blue BookUndoArticles VallyDad Cuts Daughter’s Hair Off For Getting Birthday Highlights, Then Mom Does The UnthinkableArticles VallyUndo How homeostasis is maintained Many homeostatic systems listen for distress signals from the body to know when key variables fall out of their appropriate range. The nervous system detects these deviations and reports back to a control center, often based in the brain. The control center then directs muscles, organs and glands to correct for the disturbance. The continual loop of disturbance and adjustment is known as “negative feedback,” according to the online textbook Anatomy and Physiology. For example, the human body maintains a core temperature of about 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit (37 degrees Celsius). When overheated, thermosensors in the skin and brain sound an alarm, initiating a chain reaction that directs the body to sweat and flush. When chilled, the body responds by shivering, and reducing blood circulation to the skin. Similarly, when sodium levels spike, the body signals the kidneys to conserve water and expel excess salt in concentrated urine, according to two NIH-funded studies. Animals will also adjust their behavior in response to negative feedback. For example, when overheated, we may shed a layer of clothing, move into the shade, or drink a cold glass of water. Modern models of homeostasis The concept of negative feedback dates back to Cannon’s description of homeostasis in the 1920s, and was the first explanation of how homeostasis works. But in recent decades, many scientists argue that organisms are able to anticipate potential disruptions to homeostasis, rather than only reacting to them after the fact. This alternate model of homeostasis, known as allostasis, implies that the ideal set point for a particular variable can shift in response to transient environmental changes, according to a 2015 article in Psychological Review. The point may shift under the influence of circadian rhythms, menstrual cycles or daily fluctuations in body temperature. Set points may also change in response to physiological phenomena, like fever, or to compensate for multiple homeostatic processes taking place at the same time, according to a 2015 review in Advances in Physiology Education. “The set points themselves aren’t fixed but can show adaptive plasticity,” said Art Woods, a biologist at the University of Montana in Missoula. “This model allows for anticipatory responses to upcoming potential disturbances to set points.” For example, in anticipation of a meal, the body secretes extra insulin, ghrelin and other hormones, according to a 2007 review in Appetite. This preemptive measure readies the body for the incoming flood of calories, rather than wrestling to control blood sugar and energy stores in its wake. The ability to shift set points allows animals to adapt to short-term stressors, but they may fail in the face of long-term challenges, such as climate change. “Activating homeostatic response systems can be fine for short periods of time,” Woods said. But they’re not designed to last for long. “Homeostatic systems can fail catastrophically if they are pushed too far; so, although systems may be able to handle near-term novel climates, they may not be able to handle larger changes over longer periods of time.” Homeostatic points can be adaptive. For example, in anticipation of a meal, the body secretes extra insulin, ghrelin and other hormones to prepare the body for the incoming flood of calories, rather than wrestling to control blood sugar and energy stores in its wake. Credit: Shutterstock Learn how homeostasis impacts human physiology with Crash Course.last_img read more

Carry documents with you

first_img Nation 04 Jul 2019 Lodge police report if you are a victim, students told Related News Nation 04 Jul 2019 Foreign students being victimised Related News Reports by CHRISTINA CHIN, JUSTIN ZACK and ASHLEY TANG PETALING JAYA: Foreign students must have either their passports or iKad with them or risk being detain­ed, says Immigration Department director-general Datuk Khairul Dzaimee Daud (pic).Photos of these documents will not be accepted, he said in response to complaints by foreign students of being victimised by authorities.“The iKad is a legal document which has been gazetted. center_img Nation 09 Jul 2019 Detainees given four square meals daily “All enforcement agencies including the police have been informed of this,” he said, adding that legitimate foreign students, who have been detained despite showing their iKad, should report the matter to the department.Khairul Dzaimee also dispelled claims that those detained were treated like “animals” without pro­per food and having to put up in dirty conditions.Allegations of extortion would be investigated as well. “We will take action if the allegation is true. There will be no compromise on inte­grity issues,” he told The Star.Every officer would carry an Immigration ID and students have the right to ask to see it, he said.He said depending on the location and target of the operation, Immi­­gration officers may not be in uniform.Malaysian Association of Private Colleges and Universities (Mapcu) president Datuk Dr Parmjit Singh said a 30-year-old student from Botswana was picked up recently. A scholar funded by the Botswa­na government, she arrived in Ma­­laysia on June 28 and was roun­ded up in an operation on July 5. Her passport was with the Edu­ca­tion Malaysia Global Services (EMGS), a wholly-owned company of the Education Ministry, for visa endorsement and her iKad had yet to be issued.“She was at a bus stop at about 7pm when a woman in plainclothes asked for her passport. “Because she couldn’t produce the passport, she was taken away in a truck with many others in it. The truck went to numerous locations before arriving at the police station in KL two hours later. “She was traumatised throughout this journey. No one told her what was going on.”He said student was only released about seven hours later despite her university handing over all the relevant documents. Mapcu is hoping to meet with enforcement authorities to address the issue of genuine foreign students being unreasonably harassed by enforcement, he said.“What happens when the passport has been sent for the visa to be stamped?“This can take up to two weeks and what if the iKad has not been issued yet? Even at this stage after a week, her passport has still not been returned to her after the visa endorsement.“All the students have is a photocopy of their passport and receipt from EMGS stating the passport has been submitted to them,” he said. The question remains as to why this could not be verified on the spot as the authorities have full access to the EMGS database, which clearly outlines the stage of the application with exact dates, he said. “Any smartphone can be used to access this information through the passport number and the nationality.” {{category}} {{time}} {{title}}last_img read more