Besse a rare bright spot during difficult men’s hockey season

first_imgIn a season that the Wisconsin men’s hockey team has taken a step backwards with just a 2-15-3 overall record and a 0-5-1 record in Big Ten play, sophomore forward Grant Besse has taken a big step forward on his way to quietly having a breakout season.Besse began his career as a Badger last year with a promising freshman season, compiling eight goals and six assists, playing in 36 of the team’s 37 games. A year later, with Wisconsin’s top five goal scorers from last season no longer on the team, Besse has elevated his game to a much higher level and stepped into a leadership role for this year’s young Wisconsin team.Not being a top-line guy last season took some getting used to for Besse since he had never played a role like that before in his hockey career. Coming out of Plymouth, Minnesota, Besse was named 2013 Mr. Hockey in Minnesota, thus when he came to Madison he was unaccustomed to a reserve role. However, it ended up being a beneficial learning experience for Besse that allowed him to learn from the veteran Badgers on last year’s team.“It was a bit frustrating at first obviously coming from high school where you’re the go-to guy,” Besse said. “But I’m glad it was like that. I learned from those older guys.”Just 20 games into this season, Besse is leading Wisconsin in goals (seven) and his six assists are tied for second most on the team, making him only one goal away from matching his goal and assist total from all of last season.Besse believes that increased playing time and having more chances to make plays has been a major factor in his emergence as a go-to guy for the Badgers.“I’m getting a lot more opportunities,” Besse said. “Being on the top line and on the power play, you just have more opportunities and more ways to show what I can do.”Wisconsin head coach Mike Eaves credited much of Besse’s improvement to gaining strength and using it to keep defenders from taking the puck from him.“Having a year under his belt, he’s bigger, stronger and knows what to expect,” Eaves said. “He’s stronger over the puck, so he has it a lot more.”Eaves also praised Besse for his impressive shooting ability that even caught their attention back when they recruited him out of high school. Eaves called Besse a “sniper” in reference to his gifted ability to shoot with pinpoint accuracy and overall knack for finding the back of the net.“He’s got a great gift to shoot the puck, something that’s not taught,” Eaves said. “When you shoot like that, you want him to shoot the puck as much as possible because not everybody can shoot like that.”Much like Eaves, Wisconsin senior goaltender Joel Rumpel has seen the improved play in Besse. Anytime Besse gets the puck is a reason to get excited due to his wide-ranging skillset that can threaten defenses in different ways.“Grant’s one of those special players that, when he gets the puck, you’re excited because he can make things happen,” Rumpel said. “He can turn a nothing play into something, whether it’s using his quick hands to get through guys or his deceiving shot to beat a goalie from a bad angle. He just brings that energy and that offensive dynamic that we need this year.”With so many leaders from last year’s team gone this season, Besse has not only taken a bigger role on the ice but has welcomed a bigger role off the ice as a leader of the team. Despite being new to the leadership role for this team, and just a sophomore, it hasn’t been an issue for him.Rumpel sees Besse’s maturity level as the main reason why he has been able to handle being a leader on a team with 11 true freshmen.“When you’re a young team, we’ve got to have guys like Grant, who’s mature beyond his age, and guys can look to him in the dressing room, whether it’s modeling our play after him or the things he does off the ice,” Rumpel said.But despite Besse’s strong play this season, the Badgers have been unable to have the same success as a team on the ice, as they’re still looking for their first Big Ten win of the season.The team will be looking for the sophomore forward to step up his game even more to get that first win. Besse said he feels he can do that by becoming a player who always delivers night in and night out.“I’d say consistency is probably the biggest thing I’ve been working on,” Besse said of where he could improve. “Coming game in and game out and being able to produce and not get beat defensively.”Only a sophomore, Besse has plenty of time to continue writing his story as a Badger. Regardless of where that story goes, it will undoubtedly serve as a bright spot amid a season of considerable darkness.last_img read more

I see no way out Living paycheque to paycheque is disturbingly common

first_img‘I see no way out’: Living paycheque to paycheque is disturbingly common in the U.S. Even brief income lapses can spell disaster for some households Mortgages, auto loans and credit card debt: How the poor are fuelling the booming U.S. economy Featured Stories Join the conversation → Comment Reddit More ← Previous Next → Facebook Email Share this story’I see no way out’: Living paycheque to paycheque is disturbingly common in the U.S. Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn U.S. government shutdown likely to stretch into 2019 amid border wall standoff “Inescapable.”“It’s a constant stressor.”“I see no way out.”What do professors, real estate agents, farmers, business executives, computer programmers and store clerks have in common?They’re not immune to the harsh reality of living paycheque to paycheque, according to dozens of people who responded to a Washington Post inquiry on Twitter.They’re millennials, Gen Xers and baby boomers. They work in big cities and rural towns. They’ve tried to save — but rent, child care, student loans and medical bills get in the way.Here are Canadian consumers’ biggest concerns for 2019Higher interest rates pushing more Canadians to seek debt relief as business booms for insolvency trusteesCanadians’ household debt burden creeps higherNational data on the paycheque-to-paycheque experience is flimsy, but a recent report from the Federal Reserve spotlights the prevalence of extra-tight budgets: Four in 10 adults say they couldn’t produce $400 in an emergency without sliding into debt or selling something, according to the 2017 figures.The partial government shutdown, which began last Friday and is temporarily halting pay for some 800,000 federal workers, has touched off a heated discussion on Twitter about what it means to get by in the United States. (President Donald Trump warned this closure could “last a very long time” if Congress doesn’t meet his demands for billions of dollars for a border wall.)Even brief income lapses can spell disaster for some households.“My husband is a Park Ranger in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, and he had to sign his furlough papers,” one woman tweeted. “We have a 4 yr. old and a 4-month-old, and we don’t know when his next check will come. Mortgage is due, Christmas 2 days away.”“Broke my lease to accept new fed job for which I have to attend 7 months of training in another state,” wrote another Twitter userm who later deleted the tweet. “Training canceled with shutdown. Homeless. Can’t afford short(?)-term housing/have to work full-time for no pay/returning Christmas presents.”These and other #ShutdownStories took off online after Rep. Scott Perry, R-Pa., suggested last week that a gap in wages wouldn’t be so bad.“Who’s living that they’re not going to make it to the next paycheque?” he asked reporters, adding that most of those impacted would qualify for back pay.According to economists: A lot of people.“It’s astronomical what people need just to make it month to month,” said Heidi Shierholz, a former chief economist at the Department of Labor who now studies how middle-class families spend their wages at the Economic Policy Institute, a Washington think tank that is funded by foundations and unions. “Given the high cost of transportation, housing, health care . . . There is often no wriggle room.”About 2,000 custodians, security guards, housekeepers and other federal building workers are losing money this holiday season because of the shutdown, according to 32BJ SEIU, an East Coast labour union — and because such staffers are employed by contractors, they won’t be eligible for makeup checks.“My supervisor told me we won’t be getting paid,” one State Department cleaner told The Post last week, “so my bills won’t be getting paid.”Beyond the federal labour sphere, workers across a variety of professions struggle to make ends meet.Sol Smith, chair of liberal arts at a Southern California college, said he landed his job after earning three degrees. But with four daughters and mounting health care costs, he said, saving just isn’t possible.“I see no way out,” he wrote in an email to The Post. “I am 40, have built a strong career, have 17 years experience, and if something were to happen to me, my wife and kids would be homeless within a year when my life insurance ran out.”Lani Harrison, 43, said she and her software engineer husband have trouble buying groceries after paying the US$2,249 rent on their two-bedroom Los Angeles apartment. They’re raising three young kids and rely on her husband’s income, she said. Her work as a certified car seat installer earns her US$40 per appointment, but the work isn’t steady.“Each month, we have to stretch his paycheque to make things work,” she said. “We really don’t have any savings. Many months we go under.”Sometimes, she confides in trusted friends.“I’m often surprised that their stories are so similar to ours,” she said.Dillon Holt, a housekeeping assistant at a Nashville hotel, said he’s down to one piece of chicken in his freezer. His checking account often hovers around zero, and he is unable to put away any money for the future or an emergency.“I make $12.50, work 40-50 hours a week,” he said. “I still don’t have a savings account.”Emily Webb, 38, said she works full time as an arts administrator in Columbus, Ohio, and waits tables on the side. Staying afloat each month, she said, is a precarious dance.“It’s a scramble at the end of a paycheque to deposit my tips and make sure none of my automatic payments bounce,” said Webb, who has master’s degree but cannot make her student loan payments.She’s grateful to work in her field, though, and loves her job. One big financial boost, she said, awaits her at the end of 2019.“I can finally pay off my 9-year-old car,” Webb said. “The plastic part of the back bumper was slowly sliding off the back of it. I got rear-ended by an uninsured driver 2 years ago, so I reattached it with zip ties.” center_img Related Stories December 28, 20183:00 PM EST Filed under News Economy David Rosenberg: A reality check on the U.S. strategy of cutting taxes Washington Post 0 Comments advertisement Danielle Paquette, The Washington Post “I see no way out,” says Sol Amith, shown at home in Laguna Niguel, California, on Dec. 27. 2018. “I am 40, have built a strong career, have 17 years experience, and if something were to happen to me, my wife and kids would be homeless within a year when my life insurance ran out.”Stuart W. Palley / FTWP Sponsored By: What you need to know about passing the family cottage to the next generation Twitterlast_img read more