Pacquiao confirms November 5 fight date against Vargas

first_img(The Sports Xchange) – Manny Pacquiao confirmed yesterday he will come out of retirement to fight World Boxing Organisation welterweight champion Jessie Vargas on November 5 in Las Vegas.The 37-year-old Pacquiao, also a senator in the Philippines, issued a statement to announce his comeback opponent.“Yes, the fight is on,” Pacquiao said in the statement. “Boxing is my passion. I miss what I’d been doing inside the gym and atop the ring.”Pacquiao announced his retirement following an April 9 victory over Timothy Bradley Jr in their third fight so he could focus on his senate duties in the Philippines.Pacquiao (58-6-2, 38 KOs), who has won world titles in eight weight divisions, was widely expected to return to the ring at some point.Pacquiao, who was elected to the Philippines senate in May, said he will spend the entire training camp in his home country so he can also attend to his legislative work.“Boxing is my main source of income. I can’t rely on my salary as a public official,” Pacquiao said.“I’m helping the family of my wife and my own family, as well. Many people also come to me to ask for help and I just couldn’t ignore them.”last_img read more

Update: Stave out indefinitely but not injured

first_imgThe Wisconsin football quarterback situation took another confusing turn Monday afternoon following practice, with Joel Stave remaining out indefinitely, but not because of an injury as head coach Gary Andersen had said earlier in the day. Monday morning, Andersen said Stave would miss an undisclosed amount of time with a throwing shoulder injury.Stave shut down indefinitely Update: Badgers head coach Gary Andersen told reporters after this story was published that Stave is still out indefinitely, but Read…But Andersen met with reporters in the afternoon to clear up his earlier comments. Andersen, for example, said the word “injury” was not the proper word in the statement earlier that day.“Joel is at practice. He’s at meetings. He’s in all the scenarios, as far as that stuff goes. But as far as game-prepping at this point, that’s where Joel is not with us completely 100 percent, all the time,” Andersen told reporters. “He’s at practice all the time. I don’t want to say he’s not practicing, he’s not with us because that’s not the case. When Joel feels that he can do that, he’ll be right back in that process.”The second-year head coach also made it clear that there is nothing wrong with the throwing shoulder that Stave injured in the Capital One Bowl in January.“There’s been no re-injury for Joel whatsoever,” Andersen said. “Is he injured? No. Is he ready to play right now? No.“It’s not an injury as far as him feeling like he re-hurt it, or he’s struggling or it’s a shoulder scenario. It’s him just working through getting in a position to be able to get into the game and play in a game for us.”After Andersen spoke to the media, Stave also did his best to clear up the confusion about the situation.“Physically, nothing is wrong,” Stave said. “I just haven’t thrown the ball the way I’d like to.”Despite nothing being physically wrong, Andersen said in his teleconference this morning that Stave hasn’t looked his usual self since the middle part of August. It’s hard to tell what the case might be with Stave, but tonight’s updates probably won’t be the last of it. However, Stave said the development has been more recent than that.“I’ve noticed in this past week I haven’t really thrown it the way that I’m used to or the way that’d I’d like to,” Stave said. “That’s when you start to think a little bit. You just got to get back to relax and play the game like you know you can.A report earlier in the afternoon by ESPN claimed that Stave could potentially miss the rest of the season. But when he met with the media this afternoon, Stave said he could play this weekend against Western Illinois if he had to.last_img read more

Different Takes What To Do With CHIP Deal With Threats To Obamacare

first_img I haven’t yet read Hillary Clinton’s “What Happened,” but it seems pretty clear to me what did, in fact, happen in 2016. These days, America starts from a baseline of extreme tribalism: 47 or 48 percent of the electorate will vote for any Republican, no matter how terrible, and against any Democrat, no matter how good. This means, in turn, that small things — journalists acting like mean kids in high school, ganging up on candidates they consider uncool, events that suggest fresh scandal even when there’s nothing there — can tip the balance in favor of even the worst candidate imaginable. (Paul Krugman, 9/18) Different Takes: What To Do With CHIP; Deal With Threats To Obamacare Before Single Payer News outlets examine a variety of pressing health policy issues, ranging from the reauthorization of the Children’s Health Insurance Program to what’s next for the Affordable Care Act. “Medicare for all,” or “single-payer,” is becoming a rallying cry for Democrats. This is often accompanied by calls to match the health care coverage of “the rest of the world.” But this overlooks a crucial fact: The “rest of the world” is not all alike. The commonality is universal coverage, but wealthy nations have taken varying approaches to it, some relying heavily on the government (as with single-payer); some relying more on private insurers; others in between. (Aaron E. Carroll and Austin Frakt, 9/18) National Review: Continue To Fund Children’s Health Care, But Coordinate The Programs Better CHIP was a shared vision of Republicans and Democrats alike. It seems like ancient history now, but, in 1997, I joined with members from both sides of the aisle to debate health care policy forcefully but productively. Led by Senators Ted Kennedy (D-MA) and Orrin Hatch (R-UT), we crafted the CHIP language. Bipartisan action, so crucial to the health of the country and the economy, was never more important than when it came to insuring America’s children. Now, two decades later, that progress is in jeopardy. CHIP is set to expire on September 30. (Bill Frist, 9/14) This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. CHIP, which helps states provide health-care coverage to low-income kids, is better structured than Medicaid to ensure that funds are targeted to those who need assistance most. Now, after the Affordable Care Act has created an entitlement to subsidized coverage through the exchange, CHIP-eligible families are often torn between two programs that fit together poorly. If a few minor flaws in its design are fixed, however, CHIP can fill a gap and enhance the rest of America’s health-care safety net. (Chris Pope, 9/18) Thanks to massive grassroots mobilization efforts, our state narrowly averted disaster when Congress failed to pass any version of Affordable Care Act (ACA) repeal that would have restructured Medicaid and left thousands of my constituents without health care coverage. Stopping health care repeal was a huge victory, but the fight is not over yet. Even deeper cuts to Medicaid have been proposed in the 2018 budget resolution, which would slash health care by $1.5 trillion over the next 10 years to pay for billions in tax breaks to the rich and corporations over that same period. (Rep. C.A. “Dutch” Ruppersberger, 9/17) The New York Times: The Best Health Care System In The World: Which One Would You Pick? center_img Baltimore Sun: Medicaid Cuts Shift Burdens To States The New York Times: Complacency Could Kill Health Care Forbes: Children’s Health Insurance Program Demands Quick, Bipartisan Passage The Washington Post: A Century Ago, Women Fought For Access To Contraception. The Trump Administration Threatens To Undo Their Work. The Washington Post: Before Tackling Single-Payer, Save Obamacare Before supporters of universal health coverage get all wrapped up debating a single-payer system, they need to focus on a dire threat to the Affordable Care Act likely to come up for a vote in the Senate before the end of the month. The latest repeal bill is an offering from Republican Sens. Lindsey O. Graham (S.C.) and Bill Cassidy (La.) that would tear apart the existing system and replace it with block grants to the states. Block grants — flows of money for broad purposes with few strings attached — are a patented way to evade hard policy choices. All the tough decisions are kicked down to state capitals, usually with too little money to achieve the ends the block grant is supposed to realize. (E.J. Dionne, 9/17) Trump administration officials vow that they are going to take care of the health of moms and babies. But their pledge to cut funding to Planned Parenthood promises to do the opposite. The proposed cuts have focused not just on the procedure of legal abortion (which is, of course, another column), but also on eliminating access to contraceptives. These proposals ignore a fundamental truth: Access to birth control is central to women’s health. In fact, it always has been. (Lauren MacIvor Thompson, 9/15) last_img read more