ELBC Workers Union Draws Attention to Dilapidated Building

first_imgThe President of the Liberia Broadcasting System’s Workers Union has called on government and the general public to contribute towards the renovation of houses on the ELBC compound.In an exclusive interview with the Daily Observer, Mr. Moses G. Dorbor said the dilapidated conditions of the buildings have reduced space for various functions at the station, leading to workers being restricted to one building.“I am moved as a leader and a citizen with an intelligent mind to say that ELBC needs to experience better postwar benefits. For a little over 10 years now we have had peace and continue using this state broadcaster to inform, educate and entertain people of all walks of life, but we still see these buildings continue to lie in ruin since the civil war ended,” he said.“Holding all factors constant that this is our ‘Nation’s Pride,’ the government needs to see reason to prioritize the renovation of these buildings,” said Dorbor.LBS sources estimate that about US$1.5 million is needed to address the infrastructural problems of the state run broadcast entity.“Veteran media practitioners who served ELBC and every Liberian are encouraged to contribute towards the rebuilding of the offices and staff quarters at LBS that are important to the running of the station,” he continued.According to him, the daily intake for services at the station cannot amount to the sum that can possibly mitigate the pressing challenges.The LBS Workers Union president said though donors sympathize with ELBC, they are not responsible to do it all.“The international media institutions that come to help us,” he said, “have business oriented motives and are not prepared to do everything.”He said International media like BBC, CCTV and RFI collaborate with foreign media entities in order to get their frequencies active worldwide, but are not responsible to do everything for the station.Meanwhile, Mr. Dorbor appealed to the government to increase the budget of LBS from US$800,000 to an amount that will meet the present economic realities, because the current allotment cannot meet the needs of the station. He said maintenance of the generator, salary payments and stationery, among others, are basic pressing needs of the station that the above amount cannot totally address.He praised all his LBS colleagues for their level of cooperation in realizing successes thought to be impossible in times past.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Vendors hoping for increased sales

first_imgChristmas shoppingWith Christmas Day only days away, Georgetown is buzzing with activities as excited persons fill the city’s streets and sellers display their festive commodities.Georgetown — in particular along Regent Street to Avenue of the Republic — is becoming more congested, as exuberant vendors look forward to an exciting Christmas with their families this year.However, when Guyana Times caught up with some of the vendors on Monday, they expressed that all is not as merry and bright as it may seem. A clothing vendor who gave her name only as Natasha said sales are slow although theVendor Don Paulstreets are filled with persons.“Right now things lil slow, but I’m hoping that it will pick up, maybe by weekend into next week. People not really buying clothes…but in between yuh still getting one and two things sell. I know things will pick up later on, man,” she told this publication.Meanwhile, a beads and craft vendor related that “things going nice” so far for the season.Leon Anthony said people are shopping every day. He took the time to encourage the Guyanese public to be safe on the road ways, and to always designate a driver if consuming alcohol during this season.“Everything nice, man! Everybody doing deh shopping; businesses blooming and so on. No complaints. My wish for Guyana is for everyone to have a merry Christmas and a blessed new year. Make sure to use the roadways safely, and just have a nice time,” Anthony declared.Don Paul, a fruits vendor, highlighted the reason for the season as he stated thatVendor Jerry Londonit’s a time to spread love and joy to each other. “It’s not only shopping up and suh; this time is to spend time with yuh family and people close to you. My plans for this Christmas is just to eat, drink and be merry. Season’s greetings to all Guyanese near and far”.He also noted that even though “things are slow”, he is contented with whatever he sells at the end of the day.When Guyana Times spoke with plants vendor Jerry London within the city about business sales and his plans for the season, he related that even though the holidays are near, the sales are still quite low.“Well, even though things are slow, I know that Guyanese are late shoppers; so I’m hoping that it will pick up in the week.”These vendors remain positive that things will change over the coming week.SafetyFor business persons, the Guyana Police Force has called for checks to be made to Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) systems to ensure they are working properly. In fact, the Force is encouraging that Digital Video Recorder (DVRs) be properly secured to preserve valuable information.Advice was also issued for visitors in the capital city by ‘A Division’ (Georgetown-East Bank Demerara) Commander Marlon Chapman recently, as he urgedNatasha (only name given) along with other vendors on Avenue of the Republic, Georgetownshoppers to “carry your wallet in an inside jacket or inside trousers pocket. Avoid rear pockets. Keep purses on your lap when dining out, Not dangling over the back of a chair.”According to Chapman, Police patrols and outposts around the city will be boosted in a bid to ensure a secure shopping environment.He revealed that part of the efforts to ensure increased safety is the splitting of Georgetown into seven sub-sections, as compared to six last year.These sub-sections run from Agricola, Greater Georgetown to Central Georgetown. The areas will be equipped with mobile outposts and frequent patrols will occur, with senior members of the GPF in charge of each sub-sector.last_img read more