England move pre-season training to Leeds

first_img England in trainingEngland will move their pre-tournament training base ahead of the RBS 6 Nations to Leeds.They will use facilities around the North Leeds area, including West Park Leeds RUFC – a Level 8 Yorkshire Division Two club – and weights facilities at the Leeds Rugby Academy at Kirkstall during their January 23-27 camp as they prepare to defend their RBS 6 Nations title. The area has recently hosted the England Under-17 and Under-18 squads.England have spent their January training week in Portugal for the last three years and while they will still be based at Pennyhill, Surrey, during Test weeks, Head Coach Stuart Lancaster explained the change of venue for this particular five days. DUNEDIN, NEW ZEALAND – SEPTEMBER 05: James Haskell of England (C) watches as his teammate tackle during an England IRB Rugby World Cup 2011 training session at Carisbrook on September 5, 2011 in Dunedin, New Zealand. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS “There are a variety of reasons we wanted to use a different venue centred around wanting to keep the camp in this country,” said Lancaster. “The main objectives of the camp are to spend some time together, building the team, reviewing the World Cup but more importantly working together on setting our goals for the Six Nations and beyond and getting on the same page with our rugby game plan. “By keeping it in England we can create a “new” feel to the camp, in what is a new start. It will allow us to train in conditions that we will be facing up at Murrayfield, create opportunities for the team to stay connected with the public, and allow us to invite in one or two people from outside of rugby to help us shape our future.“All the players have come through grassroots rugby and, with excellent facilities at West Park Leeds and the availability of local facilities and provision for poor weather options, Leeds was the best fit when we considered all the options. Hopefully it will also give a boost to rugby in the North and help in developing the game in the area.”last_img read more

Saints and Sinners: The weekend’s talking points

first_imgDefence turned into attack and Bath grabbed two more tries before the end, but were just held out from claiming a famous victory. The SaintsStung, but still loyalWasps supporters had the rug pulled out from under them during last week, when the club announced they were moving from High Wycombe to Coventry from December. The Aviva Premiership club’s fan base stretches from west London to the Thames Valley, because of their previous moves from their original Sudbury base, so the switch to Coventry will have more impact on some that others.The initial reaction was angry, especially from supporters who have been season-ticket holders for decades but cannot make the much longer journey to Coventry regularly. There was talk of protests at Sunday’s game against Bath and the players and management probably went into it with some trepidation.However, the Wasps supporters did themselves proud. A crowd of 7,397 turned up (including some Bath fans, of course) and while there were a few banners expressing unhappiness about the move to Coventry and underlining that not all fans will be able to follow the team to the Midlands, the fans got behind their team and roared them to victory in what turned out to be a thrilling match.The Wasps fans have good reason to be sore about the way they have been treated, but they turned the other cheek and showed nothing but determination to make the best of a bad situation.Driven to destructionSamu Manoa scored a hat-trick for Northampton Saints in their 43-10 bashing of Sale Sharks. Two of his tries owed everything to the dominance of the Saints’ pack as a whole, coming as they did from driving mauls, but they still need scoring and the American No 8 made no mistake.An honourable mention goes to another member of the forwards union, as lock Damien Welsh grabbed a brace of tries for Exeter Chiefs. Well, they can’t let the backs have all the fun, can they?He’s the Man: Samu Manoa touches down the second of his hat-trick of triesQuick thinkingJeff Hassler was stopped just short by the Cardiff Blues defence as he attempted to score the Ospreys‘ second try of the afternoon in their Guinness Pro12 derby game. Scrum-half Rhys Webb got the ball under control at the base of the ruck and looked for a scoring opportunity. He didn’t need to look far, as he realised he could see the try-line between the bodies, right by his own feet, so he dotted the ball down for a try which took the Ospreys’ lead out to 26-3. Sometimes, the simplest ideas are the best.Like father…Uruguay scrum-half Agustin Ormaechea is the toast of his nation after he helped them claim the 20th and last spot at next year’s Rugby World Cup in England. Uruguay beat Russia 36-27 in Montevideo, to take the two-leg qualification playoff 57-49 on aggregate and Ormaechea was instrumental in their triumph.Russia led 20-12 early in the second half but then a break and great offload by Ormaechea created a try for Joaquin Prada. Alejo Corral scored Uruguay’s second, from a maul, which put them 26-20 ahead as the final quarter loomed and Ormaechea raced over from the back of a scrum to seal the deal.His father Diego played for Uruguay at the 1999 World Cup and now 23-year-old Agustin will follow in his footsteps, as his nation join England, Wales, Australia and Fiji in Pool A at next autumn’s tournament.Super subThe Guinness Pro12 match between Ulster and Glasgow Warriors was a tight tussle through to 60 minutes, with Ulster 15-9 ahead but the Warriors still very much in the game. The home pack, led by Rory Best, was turning the screw on the Scots, but there will still just one score in it.Then, from the back of a rolling maul, Paul Marshall decided to set the ball free sooner than Glasgow might have expected and he found replacement wing Craig Gilroy steaming through on a superb diagonal line. Gilroy batted away two would-be tacklers and raced over for the first try of the game, which gave Ulster a more comfortable 22-9 lead.It was a great bit of vision, footwork and finishing from Gilroy, who is having to bide his time on the bench behind Andrew Trimble and Tommy Bowe. Just the impact any coach would love from their subs.Quickstep: Sailosi Tagicakibau is tough to stop but George Ford managed itRearguard actionThere have been some topsy-turvy results in the Aviva Premiership so far this season but the Wasps v Bath game was one of the most extraordinary so far, as first Wasps took a 29-0 lead, then Bath fought back with 22 unanswered points to make the hosts sweat at the end.At 29-0 down, you would expect a lot of players to be mentally back on the bus home, but not George Ford. Lauded for his great attacking play, it was his defence which helped turn the tide for Bath this time as he made not one, but two try-saving tackles within the space of a couple of minutes.Bath had stopped the rot with one try, but still looked a million miles away from getting anything out of the game, with just the last 20 minutes to play. But first Ford stopped the sizeable No 8 Nathan Hughes as he trundled towards the line, then managed to halt Sailosi Tagicakibau – easier said than done. Tries, tackles and fans caught the eye in the Aviva Premiership and Guinness Pro 12 this week, while there were heroes and villains in the IRB Sevens and Rugby World Cup too. TAGS: Wasps True colours: Wasps fans donned their jerseys and scarves and cheered their team to victory over Bath center_img Off you go: David Wilson is sent to the sin-bin, to join his team-mateThe SinnersPutting a foot wrongYou are playing away at Wasps, you are 12-0 down with 43 minutes on the clock and your team-mate Leroy Houston is in the sin-bin. What do you do next? If you are Bath prop David Wilson you deliberately trip up Wasps No 8 Nathan Hughes as he runs away from a ruck, thus giving away a kickable penalty and earning yourself a yellow card. Not clever.Scrum-half Micky Young made a bad situation worse five minutes later when he was sin-binned for tackling Christian Wade without the ball. There was still a minute to go before Houston was due back on, so Bath were briefly down to 12 men, and the offence resulted in a penalty try which put Wasps 22-0 up. At least Young carried out his misdemeanour to try to stop a certain try. Wilson was just plain silly.Semi does half the jobFiji Sevens star Semi Kunatani thought he had scored the first try of his nation’s match against Scotland on Day One of the IRB’s Goldcoast Sevens. He sprinted from halfway, then slowed to a jog as he crossed the line under the posts and turned ready to lean casually down and place the ball on the ground.That was when reality struck, in the smaller but fast-moving shape of Scotland’s Lee Jones. Showing that it is worth chasing the most utterly wayward of lost causes, Jones smashed into Kunatani and forced him to drop the ball. Unfortunately for Scotland, Fiji went on to win the match 40-7, but Jones was hailed a hero as the video of his tackle whizzed around the world on social media.Jones was cool about the whole thing, Tweeting: “One of the easier tackles to make! It’s when these Fijian boys are running around that’s the hard part!”Not a Goode ideaThere was understandable consternation among Wasps fans during last week when the club finally confirmed they would be moving from High Wycombe to Coventry. Lots of the club’s players took to Twitter to ask for the supporters to be patient and wait for the full explanation of just what dire financial straits the club was in.However, only fly-half Andy Goode chose to add an insulting caveat to his Tweet, which showed a total lack of empathy with the fans who were digesting the news that their match-day was now going to involve a round trip of anything up to 200 miles.Goode Tweeted: “To the @WaspsRugby fans who are upset, I understand but all will become clear and please stay with us, to the abusers you’re not real fans.”His hasty and unsympathetic words brought an angry reaction from some followers. @skullsstores replied: “Pardon? over 100 years of playing for and supporting Wasps in my family, aren’t I allowed to be pissed off?”@edwardoverend Tweeted: “How dare you! More than 1000 games since I was 5 and you’ve been here 5 minutes. How dare you.”And @paulmilham added, in a more conciliatory tone: “Fair comment, Andy, but some of the abusers are genuine fans pushed to the limit. This hasn’t been done well.”Goode would do well to think before he types next time. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Tatty topMagnus Lund – I have no general objection to men having long hair, or being in touch with their inner Viking, but the long-hair-under-scrum-cap look is not to be recommended.Shaggy Shark: Not too many players will be copying Magnus Lund’s looklast_img read more

Who is Damian de Allende: Ten things you should know about the South Africa centre

first_imgFind out more about the World Cup winner now tearing it up for Munster Who is Damian de Allende: Ten things you should know about the South Africa centre Damian de Allende is one of the best defensive centres in the world, but he also showed his attacking strength by dragging three Welsh defenders over the line to score the crucial try in the 2019 Rugby World Cup semi-final. He went on to start the final and produced a virtuoso performance alongside centre partner Lukhanyo Am as England failed to score a try.The long-time Stormer is now playing for Irish province Munster – here are ten more facts about him.Ten things you should know about Damian de Allende1. Damian de Allende was born on 25 November 1991 in Cape Town and went to school in Milnerton, in the city’s northern suburbs. Damian de Allende rampages forward in the 2019 World Cup against Wales (Getty Images) 7. He joined Munster in the summer of 2020. He played three matches as the 2019-20 season resumed following the Covid-enforced shutdown and then became a regular in the 2020-21 campaign in which Munster reached the final.8. He was named in the Pro14 ‘Dream Team’ after his very first full season playing for Munster. 2. Having first featured at professional level for Western Province, he made 91 appearances for Cape Town side the Stormers between 2013 and 2019.3. De Allende made his international debut for South Africa in the opening game of the 2014 Rugby Championship, starting at outside-centre against Argentina in a 13-6 win.4. His first try for the Springboks came against the USA at RWC 2015, in the same match that team-mate Bryan Habana tied Jonah Lomu’s World Cup-record 15 tries.Damian de Allende on debut in the Pretoria rain (Getty Images)5. He made more runs (65) than any other Springbok at RWC 2019 and was fourth on the overall list behind Beauden Barrett, CJ Stander and Billy Vunipola.6. After winning the 2019 World Cup, de Allende signed for the Panasonic Wild Knights on a short-term deal. Due to the coronavirus pandemic, he was forced to isolate in Tokyo with Springbok team-mate Malcolm Marx.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS 9. De Allende is a massive Liverpool fan and has spoken of his desire to cross the Irish Sea to watch matches.10. He was one of several Munster players who required treatment for burns in a fire pit accident in June 2021. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Los episcopales van a Washington para un desfile piadoso contra…

first_img Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Mar 28, 2013 Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Smithfield, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Shreveport, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Press Release Service Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Albany, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Bath, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL center_img Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Press Release Rector Belleville, IL Featured Jobs & Calls Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Tampa, FL Mariann Edgar Budde, la obispa episcopal de la Diócesis de Washington, reza en la primera estación del Via crucis en la plaza de Lafayette, Washington D.C. el 25 de marzo. Atentos junto a ella, de izquierda a derecha, James Curry e Ian Douglas, el obispo sufragáneo y el diocesano de Connecticut, respectivamente. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg para ENS.[Episcopal News Service – Washington, D.C.] Lluvia, nieve y temperaturas apenas por encima del punto de congelación no disuadieron a un grupo de unos 400 episcopales de recorrer las calles de la capital de la nación el 25 de marzo para transformar la representación tradicional de trayecto al Calvario y a la tumba de Jesús, en una procesión piadosa que se proponía desafiar lo que llamaron [sus organizadores] una cultura de la violencia.La versión moderna del antiguo ritual del Vía crucis comenzó en el exterior de la iglesia episcopal de San Juan [St. John’s Episcopal Church], en la plaza Lafayette, frente a la Casa Blanca. La liturgia móvil se desplazó desde la Casa Blanca y concluyó en la escalinata occidental del Capitolio federal aproximadamente dos horas y media después. Obispos, presbíteros y diáconos en la procesión llevaban sotanas u otros atuendos clericales, y a los participantes los encabezaba una cruz de madera mientras desfilaban desde la Casa Blanca por una de las sendas de la avenida Pensilvania que estaba cerrada al tránsito.“Ustedes salieron a caminar por Cristo en un momento en que la mayoría de la gente se habría quedado dentro [de sus casas] y habría encontrado otra cosa que hacer”, le dijo a los feligreses James Curry, obispo sufragáneo de Connecticut, una vez concluido el Via crucis.En un encuentro con los medios de información antes de que comenzara el Via crucis, Curry expresó que “el lugar de la Iglesia en nuestra sociedad es el lugar de Jesucristo que se enfrentó a la violencia y murió a consecuencia de ello”.“Sabemos que ésta es una lucha que tomará años y años, y nuestro compromiso es seguir cargando esa cruz por nuestros hijos y por nuestra sociedad”, añadió.Si bien no se mencionó en la liturgia el fácil acceso a las armas de fuego y la aflicción que causan los tiroteos, los feligreses durante sus paradas, cerca de monumentos, edificios del gobierno y obras de arte, ofrecieron sus oraciones fundamentalmente por el fin de una cultura de la violencia y por las condiciones sociales y económicas que engendran la violencia.El Via crucis  o estaciones de la Cruz, es un antiguo ritual que conmemora el sufrimiento de Jesús desde que fuera condenado por Poncio Pilato hasta su crucifixión y sepultura. Los fieles caminan metafóricamente con Jesús, deteniéndose a orar inspirados por los sucesos, algunos de ellos legendarios, que ocurrieron mientras Jesús cargaba su cruz.Laura Ahrens, obispa sufragánea de la Diócesis de Connecticut, dirige el Via crucis frente a la Casa Blanca, mientras James Curry, quien también es obispo sufragáneo de esa diócesis, la ayuda con el sistema de sonido. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg para ENS.La liturgia escrita especialmente para este Via crucis  se encuentra aquí.Curry, el diocesano de Connecticut Ian T. Douglas y la obispa sufragánea Laura J. Ahrens organizaron el servicio días después de la matanza de 28 personas, entre alumnos, maestros y empleados, en la escuela elemental “Sandy Hook” de Newtown, el 14 de diciembre de 2012. Entre los que murieron estaba Benjamin Andrew Wheeler, de 6 años, que era miembro de la iglesia episcopal de La Trinidad [Trinity Episcopal Church] en Newtown. Los obispos llevaron a cabo el proyecto en colaboración con Mariann Edgar Budde, obispa de Washington, D.C.,  y un equipo de su diócesis.Otros obispos episcopales que participaron, total o parcialmente, en el evento, fueron Wayne Wright,  de Delaware; Nedi Rivera, de Oregón Oriental; Mary Glasspool, de Los Ángeles; Larry Provenzano, de Long Island; Gayle Harris, de Massachusetts; Steven Miller, de Milwaukee; Mark Beckwith, de Newark; David Bailey, de Navajolandia; Rob Hirschfeld, de Nuevo Hampshire; Gene Robinson, (jubilado) de Nuevo Hampshire; W. Nicholas Knisely, de Rhode Island; Dorsey Henderson, de Alta Carolina del Sur; Shannon Johnston, de Virginia; Douglas Fisher, de Massachusetts Occidental y Porter Taylor, de Carolina del Norte Occidental. También participó el Rvdmo. Dinis S. Sengulane, obispo de Lebombo, Mozambique, de la Iglesia Anglicana de África del Sur, quien ayudó a ponerle fin a la guerra civil en su país e inspiró la recogida y conversión de armas de la guerra [en instrumentos] para fines pacíficos.Antes de que comenzara el Via crucis, los obispos se reunieron, en la iglesia de San Juan, con Stephanie Valencia, subdirectora de la Oficina de Compromiso Público y con Paul Monteiro, director asociado de esa oficina, a fin de discutir sobre la legislación pendiente para reducir la violencia.Muchos de los obispos forman parte de Episcopales Contra la Violencia Armada, un grupo ad hoc de obispos, clérigos y laicos episcopales que laboran, colectiva e individualmente, para reducir la violencia con armas de fuego. El grupo tiene una presencia en Facebook y está en Twitter. La etiqueta para el Via crucis es #DCWitness.Clérigos y laicos de todas las edades acudieron de todo el nordeste para asistir al Via crucis: un desfile en Washington D.C., el 25 de marzo, en desafío a una cultura de la violencia. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg para ENS.Poco después de concluido el Via crucis, la mayoría de los participantes se reunió en el Salón Montpelier del edificio James Madison Memorial, que forma parte de la Biblioteca del Congreso para unos breves comentarios de líderes de la Iglesia y del gobierno en apoyo al llamado del presidente Barack Obama a favor de una reforma de la política sobre las armas de fuego y las decisiones legislativas que están pendientes en el Congreso.Los obispos Curry y Douglas, y Sengulane de Mozambique, estuvieron entre los oradores. Hablaron también el Rep. John Larson (demócrata por Connecticut), la Rep. Eleanor Holmes Norton y la Rda. Brenda Griton-Mitchell, directora de la Oficina de Asociaciones [de organizaciones] de Carácter Religioso y Vecindarios [Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships] del Departamento de Educación de EE.UU.Holmes Norton, que fue bautizada en la Iglesia Episcopal, dijo “Nosotros en el Distrito de Columbia conocemos el lobby de las armas más que los demás”, haciendo notar los constantes esfuerzos para evitar que el Distrito imponga regulaciones más estrictas para [la adquisición] de armas de fuego.Sin embargo, afirmó ella, hay personas en todo el país que se están movilizando para reclamar la imposición de leyes que reduzcan la violencia armada “y esta vez no retrocederemos”.El 25 de marzo, cerca de 400 personas recorrieron devotamente la avenida Pensilvania en un Washington frío y lluvioso, desde la Casa Blanca hasta el Capitolio federal para hacer un llamado a ponerle fin a la violencia. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg para ENS.Griton-Mitchell, abogada y ministra bautista, dijo “Preferiría ver un sermón que oír uno cualquier día”. Ella insistió que en el Vía crucis en verdad había visto un sermón.Sengulane, que celebró el 38º. Aniversario de su ordenación y de su consagración como obispo el 25 de marzo, dijo que tener un arma en la casa como protección es como tener una serpiente venenosa por la misma razón. No hay ninguna garantía de a quién ha de morder. Un arma es también “muy mal consejero” respecto a como manejar un conflicto, apuntó.El Via crucis del 25 de marzo fue la última de una serie de medidas tomadas por episcopales a través de la Iglesia que intentan eliminar la violencia armada. Los líderes a nivel denominacional también se han pronunciado al respecto.Mary Glasspool, obispa sufragánea de Los Ángeles, capta en vídeo a Gayle Harris, obispa sufragánea de la Diócesis de Massachusetts, dirigiendo las oraciones en una de las estaciones del Via crucis. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg para ENS.A mediados de febrero, la obispa primada, Katharine Jefferts Schori, en un testimonio por escrito al Subcomité Judicial sobre la Constitución, los Derechos Civiles y los Derechos Humanos del Senado de Estados Unidos, instó a los legisladores a “presionar por una verificación completa y universal de antecedentes para [adquirir] la propiedad de un arma de fuego, independientemente de dónde y cómo se compre el arma; a prohibir el acceso de los civiles a fusiles de asalto y a cargadores de alta capacidad, y a la puesta en vigor de políticas concebidas para regular mejor la fabricación de armas”.Jefferts Schori hizo notar que la Iglesia Episcopal ha dicho continuamente durante más de 40 años “que no puede ignorarse el papel de las armas en la cultura de violencia de nuestra sociedad”. Y, si bien la Iglesia “apoya el derecho constitucional a portar armas de los ciudadanos respetuosos de las leyes”, dijo la Obispa Primada, la Iglesia “es clara en que las leyes y las actividades policiales federales, estatales y locales deben centrar sus esfuerzos en mantener las armas fuera del alcance de los menores y de aquellos que las podrían usar para la comisión de delitos violentos”.La Obispa Primada no pudo participar en el Vía crucis de Washington, D.C. porque se encontraba en Inglaterra para una reunión del Comité Permanente de la Comunión Anglicana, que siguió a la investidura del arzobispo de Cantórbery Justin Welby. Douglas, que también es miembro del Comité Permanente y que asistió a la ceremonia de investidura, estuvo presente en los primeros dos días de la reunión antes de regresar para ayudar a la conducción de este evento.Las 13ª. Y 14ª. estaciones del Via crucis fueron en el césped húmedo y lodoso del Capitolio federal. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg para ENS.A fines de febrero, el Consejo Ejecutivo de la Iglesia pidió a los episcopales que “se arrepintieran de sus propios papeles en la glorificación y trivialización de la violencia”. La resolución insta a los episcopales a laborar en pro de “respuestas sociales globales que busquen la eliminación de los ciclos de la violencia que estimulan los delitos con armas de fuego”.Pidió también que los servicios de salud mental estuvieran disponibles y fueran accesibles “sin estigma en toda una variedad de escenarios”, y que estuvieran a la disposición de “los que han sufrido traumas por haberse visto expuestos a la violencia o a medioambientes violentos”.La Resolución A&N004 instó a los funcionarios electos a hacer del tráfico de armas un delito federal y a facultar a los funcionarios de los cuerpos de orden público para investigar a intermediarios, traficantes de armas y a  la totalidad de sus redes delictivas”.E instó a los episcopales a “examinar sus propias actitudes culturales hacia la violencia, mediante campañas en congregaciones y comunidades [y] a arrepentirse de nuestros propios papeles en la glorificación y trivialización de la violencia, y a comprometernos a [obrar] de otro modo”.Inmediatamente después de la reunión del Consejo, la Rda. Gay Clark Jennings y el Hon. Byron Rushing, presidente y vicepresidente respectivamente de la Cámara de Diputados, enviaron una carta a los diputados a la Convención General en que bosquejaban la resolución del Consejo y decían que esperaban que los diputados “ayudaran a conducir a la Iglesia al cumplimiento de esta resolución”.El 22 de marzo, la Red Episcopal de Política Pública, con sede en Washington, D.C., expidió una alerta normativa aquí en que sugerían tres medidas que los episcopales podían tomar para responder a los llamados del liderazgo de la Iglesia a abogar por el fin de la violencia armada.– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Collierville, TN Featured Events Los episcopales van a Washington para un desfile piadoso contra la violencia El antiguo ritual del Via crucis va de la Casa Blanca al Capitolio Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SClast_img read more

Election Toolkit helps Episcopalians engage in nonpartisan activities

first_img Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Faith & Politics Donald Trump, Election 2016, Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Bath, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Music Morristown, NJ Comments are closed. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Tags Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Helene de Boissiere – Swanson says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Posted May 18, 2016 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Job Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit an Event Listing Doug Desper says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group May 19, 2016 at 8:39 am I am delighted that TEC is encouraging folks to vote in the ucpoming election and participate in politics. For many years now our organization has been promoting the Equal Rights Amendment. I am hoping that other Episcopalians will become more active in moving our great nation to pass the ERA. We only need three more states and resolutions at previous General Conventions have called for the renewed support for the passage of the ERA. I invite all to visit our website and facebook page to learn more.Love and Light in Christ,Helene de Boissiere, Founder Katrina’s Dreamhttp://www.katrinasdream.orgKatrina’s Dream is an Episcopal organization founded in the memory of the Rev. Katrina Swanson who was one of the “Philadelphia Eleven” The first group of women to be ordained in the Episcopal Church. The mission of Katrina’s Dream is to promote the full inclusion of women in the church and in society and other social justice issues. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs press release] The 2016 election in the United States remains the top of the news in media outlets, and it is inevitably a topic in personal conversations. To provide education about the election as well as assisting in being prepared, The Episcopal Church has developed an online toolkit with a webpage that outlines how individual Episcopalians and congregations can participate in the electoral process through a number of nonpartisan activities.Through the Episcopal Public Policy Network (EPPN), information is also available on an important initiative, the Episcopal Pledge to Vote.  The EPPN is calling on all Episcopalians to pledge that they will cast a vote in the general election. You can make your pledge to vote and find the toolkit which is designed to assist Episcopalians in being informed and engaged voters on the EPPN election webpage.“On November 8 our nation will head to the polls to decide a number of important elections, and there are many opportunities for Episcopalians to engage in this electoral process,” noted Lacy Broemel, manager for communications and operations, in the Episcopal Church Office of Government RelationsBroemel explained that the Episcopal Church policy recognizes voting and political participation as an act of Christian stewardship, calling upon congregations to engage in conversation on public policy issues, to develop voter registration and issue education campaigns, and to advocate to counteract threats to voting rights.All election engagement resources, including the downloadable Episcopal Election Engagement Toolkit, are available on the Episcopal Public Policy Network site here.Among the possible non-partisan activities offered are: engaging young adults who are eligible to vote for the first time; hosting a candidate forum; advocating for voting rights legislation; and hosting Get Out The Vote campaigns.“Engaging in elections is one way we can live out our call to care for our neighbors as ourselves,” Broemel explained. “Election engagement goes beyond simply casting a ballot, but includes engaging in civil discourse and protecting voting rights.”#EpiscopaliansVote Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Events AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis May 20, 2016 at 8:18 am The Toolkit materials give a sense that requiring a photo ID to vote is overly restrictive. I cannot disagree more. The Toolkit goes at length to suggest ways that people should prepare themselves to become both involved and informed. Most of these suggestions require time and effort, including networking with those less-involved to become more interested. The simple fact is that voter fraud has been widely practiced and obtaining a proper ID – while requiring effort – is not an obstacle to people who are truly investing themselves and educating themselves. Comments (2) Cathedral Dean Boise, ID This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Election Toolkit helps Episcopalians engage in nonpartisan activitieslast_img read more

L’Évêque Primat et d’autres dirigeants épiscopaux demandent à Donald Trump…

first_img Rector Collierville, TN Advocacy Peace & Justice, Faith & Politics, TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Tags Featured Jobs & Calls Donald Trump, Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Events Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Job Listing Submit an Event Listing The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Music Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Refugees Migration & Resettlement An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH L’Évêque Primat et d’autres dirigeants épiscopaux demandent à Donald Trump de maintenir la réinstallation des réfugiés Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Press Release Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska de Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jan 25, 2017 [Episcopal News Service] L’Évêque Primat et le directeur de l’organisme Episcopal Migration Ministries (EMM) se sont tous deux exprimés le 25 janvier pour anticiper les mesures du président Donald Trump concernant l’immigration.Le réseau Episcopal Public Policy Network a, quant à lui, publié un avis d’alerte proposant aux épiscopaliens la possibilité de devenir défenseurs de l’immigration et des réfugiés.Ces initiatives ont eu lieu le jour où Donald Trump a signé des décrets pour commencer la construction d’un mur à la frontière des États-Unis avec le Mexique et pour bloquer les subventions fédérales aux « villes sanctuaires » protégeant les immigrés. Le Washington Post a publié que Donald Trump, lors d’une visite au Département de la sécurité intérieure, a également signé la première d’une série de directives visant à appliquer de nouvelles restrictions à l’encontre de 11 millions d’immigrés estimés sans papiers aux États-Unis.Ces décrets de Donald Trump ainsi que d’autres qu’il a signés se trouvent ici.Les collaborateurs de Donald Trump ont suggéré que d’autres directives pourraient être émises plus tard cette semaine, selon le Washington Post, notamment des restrictions supplémentaires concernant les personnes provenant de pays à majorité musulmane. Le quotidien a rapporté qu’il avait eu communication de la version préliminaire d’un décret présidentiel intitulé : « comment protéger la nation contre des attaques terroristes de ressortissants étrangers » qui prévoit l’arrêt des visas aux personnes se trouvant dans des « pays particulièrement préoccupants ». Le quotidien a indiqué que le décret tiendrait une promesse de campagne de Donald Trump de contrôler les candidats à l’immigration et les visiteurs aux États-Unis, en partie sur la base de leurs opinions et idéologie et de cesser immédiatement la réinstallation des réfugiés syriens aux États-Unis.L’Évêque Primat Michael Curry, le révérend E. Mark Stevenson, directeur d’EMM (Episcopal Migration Ministries), et le réseau de politique publique se sont élevés contre les mesures annoncées.Michael Curry a déclaré que les travaux de réinstallation des réfugiés représentent un ministère qui tient à cœur à l’Église épiscopale ainsi qu’à d’autres églises et organismes confessionnels.« Le travail de l’organisme EMM est l’œuvre de Dieu et nous montrons le visage de Dieu par le biais de l’entraide et de la compassion manifestées à travers ces travaux », explique Michael Curry. « Je demande au Président Trump de continuer sans interruption le travail en profondeur de notre programme de réinstallation des réfugiés, en prenant en compte le long processus d’attente et de contrôle qui se traduit pour les réfugiés par des mois et parfois des années d’attente pour entrer dans le pays.« Nous demandons que nous continuions d’accepter autant de réfugiés que nous l’avons fait par le passé, en reconnaissant que le besoin est plus important que jamais. Nous demandons que les réfugiés de tous les pays soient pris en considération pour venir aux États-Unis et de ne pas bannir ceux qui viennent de pays nécessitant le plus notre aide ».Mark Stevenson a déclaré que toute mesure visant à suspendre le programme américain de réinstallation des réfugiés pendant une durée significative « veut dire que beaucoup de ceux qui sont les plus vulnérables, les plus en danger de violence, ceux qui ont le moins de chance d’être en mesure de pourvoir à leurs propres besoins, vont maintenant être abandonnés sans aucun espoir ».« Cette position ne reflète pas qui nous sommes en tant que nation ni en tant que croyants », a-t-il conclu.Chaque année, l’organisme EMM de l’Église épiscopale travaille en partenariat avec son réseau d’affiliés locaux de 30 membres répartis dans 26 États ainsi qu’avec des diocèses, des communautés de foi et des bénévoles, pour accueillir des réfugiés provenant des zones de conflit à travers le monde. Cette année, EMM a prévu d’accueillir aux États-Unis 5 000 réfugiés de 32 pays, notamment de la République démocratique du Congo, de Birmanie, d’Afghanistan et de Syrie.L’organisme assure un passage sûr et la prestation de services essentiels pour des milliers de familles de réfugiés à leur arrivée aux États-Unis, tels des cours de langue et d’orientation culturelle, des services d’emploi, les inscriptions pour les écoles et l’aide initiale en matière de logement et de transport. Pour chaque famille, l’objectif est l’autosuffisance et l’autodétermination.EMM est l’un des neuf organismes de réinstallation des États-Unis sous contrat avec le gouvernement fédéral pour aider à réinstaller les réfugiés autorisés à entrer aux États-Unis. La majeure partie du financement d’EMM provient de ces contrats.Selon Mark Stevenson, les restrictions que prévoit Donald Trump en ce qui concerne les réfugiés seraient considérées comme des mesures visant à rendre le pays plus sûr. « Et pourtant, nous isoler du monde ne nous met pas plus en sécurité, cela ne fait que nous isoler », poursuit-il. « Avoir peur de ceux qui sont différents de nous ne nous rend pas avisés ni même prudents ; cela ne fait que nous emprisonner dans une caisse de résonance de méfiance et de colère qui nous empêche totalement d’aimer comme le Christ a aimé ». Press Release Service Rector Albany, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Shreveport, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 last_img read more

Letter to the Episcopal Church from Presiding Bishop, President of…

first_imgLetter to the Episcopal Church from Presiding Bishop, President of House of Deputies ‘Our church must examine its history and come to a fuller understanding of how it has handled or mishandled cases of sexual harassment, exploitation and abuse through the years’ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group January 25, 2018 at 4:05 pm Michelle, understood. In the business world, lets be frank the EDUSA is in effect a business. Nothing gets their attention quicker than a law enforcement investigation and if warranted a civil law suit. The tone of the article as I read it says the church needs to understand its past sins and reconcile its policies to eliminate this kind of behavior. If the church is really serious then it would root out this kind of behavior and fire the people responsible. A slap on the wrist and a reassignment of the guilty party only serves to continue said behavior. (Isn’t there a law against retaliation for reporting sexual abuse?) Until the church is ready to step up to this issue the only way to get their attention is to hit them hard in the pocketbook. January 23, 2018 at 2:43 pm Speaking as a longtime friend of one of the victims and as someone who has witnessed firsthand the harm that this abuse has done for years, my response to this “statement” by the church is that it’s far too little, far too late. Furthermore, it was likely written by, and/or with the advice of, the church’s legal team. (I work in legal myself, so I readily recognize the “show remorse for those hurt by wrongdoing but don’t personally admit to doing it” approach.) It is classic “lip service”: “Yes, a bad thing was done. The bad thing was bad. No one should do the bad thing anymore. When we’re told the bad thing happened, we should say we’re sorry the bad thing was done. And we are.” I’ve literally earned my living typing countless settlement agreements, drafted by lawyers, that say some version of this!Is this really supposed to make the victims feel better? Aren’t they owed just a little bit more (and by a little, I mean a LOT)? Law enforcement should be investigating this kind of thing. If crime is discovered, the guilty should be punished. The Catholic church had to pay hundreds of millions in settlements (one notorious priest, Oliver O’Grady, did go to jail, but is now living a free life in his native Ireland – an injustice which damaged his victims all over again). “Repentance” will not suffice here. There exists a duty to report. NO ONE engaging in such behavior should get a free pass – except to jail! Shame on the episcopal diocese for this weak-kneed response. Clearly, the only interests it’s protecting are its own. General Convention, Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH January 27, 2018 at 9:25 am Thank you for this. With God’s Help together we can make a difference. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Job Listing January 25, 2018 at 10:27 am Mr. Louis,That’s all very well and good, but as you pointed out, the church refuses to take responsibility for the behavior of its employees. It also refuses to support its victims.That’s what we’re discussing. The courts are a completely separate issue.Thanks for the thought, though. C. A. Duncan says: Patricia Ross says: Comments (10) January 25, 2018 at 1:01 pm Dear Mr. Louis,Here’s something else for you, as well as the church, to consider: First, suggesting that the victim contact the police, then take the perp to court, doesn’t free the church from its responsibility to discipline any employee who breaks the law, and to come to the victim’s aid. Without the victim having to fear retaliation.I’d like to add that the church needs to wake up: In the “real world”, women rarely report sexual assault and such for fear of reprisal, and being re-victimized by that “real world”. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Bill Louis says: Rector Collierville, TN Tags New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Press Release Service Michelle Wright says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Pittsburgh, PA General Convention 2018, Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Comments are closed. Featured Events Submit an Event Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 January 22, 2018 at 5:27 pm The Most Rev. Michael B. Curry and The Rev. Gay Clark Jennings wrote:“[W]e must confess and repent of those times when the church, its ministers or its members have been antagonistic or unresponsive to people—women, children and men—who have been sexually exploited or abused.” Thank you. It’s about time.It’s easy to say all the right things. Now, I hope that the church will really do something, not just say that it will repent of past sexual exploitation and abuse. Prayer means little unless it’s backed up by concrete action. Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY January 22, 2018 at 7:21 pm I find this letter a bit of a vapid first, baby step. And I suppose many will wonder why I am not just rolling with gratitude for a baby step. The short answer is that I expect the Church, the Body of Christ, to act like a grown-up, a leader, an example, not a tiny child who must be taught to make proper greetings.This church has been guilty of harming thousands of women, yet the call to action in this letter is to meditate on how the church has failed. Thankfully, the writers did not call us to meditate on whether we have failed; that is an important distinction. I am troubled by the call for more consultation, in which, the victims must once again explain and persuade and teach and chart the way for the whole church to figure out how to repent of oppression, rape, domination. I ask our leaders: Please lead. Please go out on a limb for justice. Please set the example of apology and restitution. Thank you Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Church Office of Public AffairsPosted Jan 22, 2018 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Press Release Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Bill Louis says: Michelle Wright says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID January 25, 2018 at 7:11 am Michelle, report the assault to the police. Let the law handle it and deal with the perp as he should be deal with. That’s how it works in the real world. The church has proven they will only sweep it under the rug. Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Michael B. Curry and President of the House of Deputies the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings have written the following letter to the Episcopal Church.January 22, 2018Dear People of God in the Episcopal Church:In recent weeks, compelling testimony from women who have been sexually harassed and assaulted by powerful men has turned our minds to a particularly difficult passage of holy scripture:  the story of the rape of King David’s daughter Tamar by her half-brother Amnon (2 Samuel 13: 1-22). It is a passage in which a conspiracy of men plots the exploitation and rape of a young woman. She is stripped of the power to speak or act, her father ignores the crime, and the fate of the rapist, not the victim, is mourned. It is a Bible story devoid of justice.For more than two decades, African women from marginalized communities have studied this passage of scripture using a method called contextual Bible study to explore and speak about the trauma of sexual assault in their own lives. Using a manual published by the Tamar Campaign, they ask, “What can the Church do to break the silence against gender-based violence?”It is, as the old-time preachers say, a convicting question. As our societies have been forced into fresh recognition that women in all walks of life have suffered unspoken trauma at the hands of male aggressors and harassers, we have become convinced that the Episcopal Church must work even harder to create a church that is not simply safe, but holy, humane and decent. We must commit to treating every person as a child of God, deserving of dignity and respect. We must also commit to ending the systemic sexism, misogyny and misuse of power that plague the church just as they corrupt our culture, institutions and governments.Like our African siblings in faith, we must create contexts in which women can speak of their unspoken trauma, whether suffered within the church or elsewhere. And we must do more.Our church must examine its history and come to a fuller understanding of how it has handled or mishandled cases of sexual harassment, exploitation and abuse through the years. When facts dictate, we must confess and repent of those times when the church, its ministers or its members have been antagonistic or unresponsive to people—women, children and men—who have been sexually exploited or abused. And we must acknowledge that in our church and in our culture, the sexual exploitation of women is part of the same unjust system that also causes gender gaps in pay, promotion, health and empowerment.We believe that each of us has a role to play in our collective repentance. And so, today, we invite you to join us in an Ash Wednesday Day of Prayer on February 14 devoted to meditating on the ways in which we in the church have failed to stand with women and other victims of abuse and harassment and to consider, as part of our Lenten disciplines, how we can redouble our work to be communities of safety that stand against the spiritual and physical violence of sexual exploitation and abuse.Neither of us professes to have all of the wisdom necessary to change the culture of our church and the society in which it ministers, and at this summer’s General Convention, we want to hear the voice of the wider church as we determine how to proceed in both atoning for the church’s past and shaping a more just future. May we find in our deliberations opportunities to listen to one another, to be honest about our own failings and brokenness, and to discern prayerfully the ways that God is calling us to stand with Tamar in all of the places we find her—both inside the church and beyond our doors, which we have too often used to shut her out.Faithfully,The Most Rev. Michael B. Curry                            The Rev. Gay Clark JenningsPresiding Bishop                                                   President, House of Deputies Judith Atkinson says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA Advocacy Peace & Justice, January 24, 2018 at 12:11 pm My friend, Reverend Carter Heyward recently wrote a Guest Column in our local newspaper entitled, “Time to Address Patriarchal Power Relations” in which she said, “Make no mistake, systems and dynamics of patriarchal privilege, power, and control – – not a random heap of sexually confused men – – are the root cause of the sexual misconduct crisis we are facing. Unless we get at the root, there will be no lasting change.” The purpose of this letter is to suggest that we, as a church that has stood at the forefront of social justice efforts, should now step up to lead in the current movement to make gender equality a reality. TEC should undertake a comprehensive and honest look at how our lives are ”literally built on long-standing gendered assumptions about power.” Undeniably, TEC has been and to a degree remains a contributor to the perpetuation of some of those assumptions. To its credit, TEC has developed and embraced programs like Dismantling Racism and Child Protection. While it also has in place policies addressing sexual misconduct relating to priest and church staff, I am urging us to undertake a far more widespread initiative encompassing all the Church. We need to raise awareness and sensitivity to how so many of our customs and practices are permeated with gender bias. To paraphrase Dr. King, we need to strive for a world where people “will not be judged by their gender, but by the content of their character.” A number of clergy from various denominations recently signed a letter entitled, “#SilenceIsNotSpiritual – Breaking the Silence on Violence Against Women and Girls.” The letter noted, “We are experiencing a kairos moment – a window of opportunity to bring healing in the world and in the church. The rise of the recent #MeToo and #ChurchToo movements have compelled us to examine our own beliefs and actions concerning the state of women.” The letter concludes with “Called by faith, compelled by love, and committed to the promise that women will live free from the terror of violence, we, the undersigned, invite you to join this movement, an awakening of repentance and reconciliation, sparking genuine change in the very place we call our home – the local church.” From a practical prospective, in the December 20, 2017 edition of The New Yorker, Jeannie Suk Gersen’s article, “The Transformation of Sexual-Harassment Law Will Be Double-Faced” posed the question, “How will the current avalanche of sexual-harassment allegations toppling prominent men in media and government roll down to more mundane workplaces? As employers and employees across the country try to apply lessons from #MeToo into quotidian employment contexts, legal norms that govern sexual harassment may also be poised to undergo epochal transformations.” Professor Gersen concludes her article saying, “Among the imperatives of #MeToo is that employers, and, indeed, all institutions, must take care to implement orderly processes in which reports of harassment are fairly and impartially investigated, and yield results that inspire confidence – to the benefit of victims as well as the accused.” This rapid emergence of this movement has given voice to many who have long suffered in silence. The pervasiveness of the problem has interrupted long-held assumptions by many who had no clue as to the magnitude. Now is the time for TEC to step forward to bring focus and compassion to this challenge to make true and monumental change to our awareness, sensitivity and resolve to bring about gender equality. I urge the formation of a broad-based task force of clergy and lay persons that would be charged with developing a comprehensive curriculum that addresses the patriarchal roots of gender bias, that raises awareness of the myriad ways gender bias has become imbedded in our customs and practices of our churches and communities, that provides a better understanding of the various forms of sexual harassment that exist and that creates a forum for free and frank discussion of the many facets of gender equality issues. Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Michelle Wright says: Rector Tampa, FL President of the House of Deputies, Rector Smithfield, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Michelle Wright says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Michael Wainwright says: Presiding Bishop Michael Curry Rector Bath, NC January 24, 2018 at 2:34 pm With all due respect, it’s long past time for study and prayer. It’s too late for that. Repentance means that the church must act. I’m tired of empty words, no matter how noble they are. It’s time for the church to actually do something to protect future victims. I was assaulted in a church by my boss, a lay employee. When I reported it to the priest and to the diocese, nothing much happened.The only action taken was a slap on the wrist to the perpetrator, where he was required to take a safe church class. These classes aren’t a hardship. They’re routine, and indeed, are they’re required in the Roman Catholic Church. He kept his job. He called me a liar.Something must be done so that the church can take concrete action, not only when clergy go astray, but when lay employees hurt their underlings. Otherwise, future victims will never be safe, and all of the talk of repentance, love, and justice will be meaningless.last_img read more

Grant program to be developed to support congregations’ grassroots work…

first_img william dailey says: Gene Moore says: Joe Prasad says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group August 10, 2018 at 11:42 am Jordan,Thank you for your comment. You show a clear sociological understanding that others who wish to use individual evidences for their points of view do not understand. Racism is a sociological and spiritual reality, not simply an interactive and psychological one. I would like to hear more from priests of our Church, like myself, in this dialogue. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Matt Ouellette says: August 7, 2018 at 6:40 pm Doug,We do give credit where credit is due. There has been great progress in American society. However, there is always more progress to be made, more injustices to correct. For example, Do you think it right and just that the voting rights of minorities are actively being suppressed by the imposition of voter identification laws or for college students to be forced to pay poll taxes in order to vote? (They are a non-traditional minority as they are often poor and in various forms economically disadvantaged- see: https://www.laconiadailysun.com/opinion/letters_to_editor/gop-bill-targeted-liberal-voting-bloc-of-college-students/article_343da53c-86d7-11e8-86a6-b7774ad0acf7.html) We have made much progress in many forms of our civil and social rights as a country, but we still have so far to go. General Convention, Comments (53) Matt Ouellette says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Lou Schoen says: Jordan Sakal says: August 9, 2018 at 6:43 pm Seems like almost every discussion of public issues these days, including racial justice, if addressed in a broad audience, descends into a battle between “conservatives” and “liberals.” I’d love to see us progress to a point where we can exchange information, experiences and viewpoints without condemning those expressed by someone else. Without such a strategy, there’s little hope of building a Beloved Community. Robbie Johnson says: August 10, 2018 at 5:07 pm Mr. Waters,Again, if you had read my comment instead of just skimming it for select pertinent quotes and trying to “soundbyte” me, you would realise that I agreed with you (See: While you are correct that it is not you personally who is responsible for the sins of slavery or of economic injustice, or so many other social ills. We all share the responsibility as members of a people who through their own erroneous deeds and actions throughout history have caused these injustices to exist.) I absolved you of personal responsibility which you so righteously clamored for. That being said, I respectfully again hold that as part of the human race, Caucasians including myself and yourself and all others are responsible for those evils referenced previously. We did not personally do those crimes or commit those actions, but we are still responsible for the making of reparations or the healing of those social ills. We must all take actions that will help heal those divisions. How would you like to have “respectful” discourse on this issue? Would you like to just sweep it under the rug and pretend that it doesn’t exist? I’m sorry but that’s your status quo and it will not stand any longer. Not for me, not for my generation, and not for others here too. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Robbie Johnson says: Rector Albany, NY Jordan Sakal says: Racial Justice & Reconciliation Larry Waters says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Ken Taber LMSW, M Div says: Jordan Sakal says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Doug Desper says: August 6, 2018 at 2:39 pm We can talk about “privilege” in many terms if we want to be truly honest. Dare we? I’ll take the hit for saying this as someone who worked with minority youth and their families for years in social services. It was found by young people that having more children out of wedlock would get government largess which made the prospect of legitimate earning foreign. Turning down work and tuition-free education was too common. That’s privilege! I am sad to say that there were few “takers” to live self-sufficiently. There were a few radically good changes — but too few. Yes, there are examples of white privilege. Some of them are horrible and deserve exposure. But whites are not alone, and that is my point. This is the blind spot of today’s efforts of racial reconciliation. Heaping the world’s ills on one race while not addressing the privilege and lack of personal responsibility of, for example, the nearly 80% out-of-wedlock births of the African American community (and all of the setbacks, obstacles, and taxpayer burden of those choices) is just plain wrong. When did it become fashionably accepted to blame whites for the ills of America? Liberals don’t even hide it anymore. The New York Times just hired an opinion editor who was defended by them – defended – for her inflammatory hatred of whites. One of Sarah Jeong’s more tame racial zingers was “oh man it’s kind of sick how much joy I get out of being cruel to old white men”. (I wonder if it entered her mind that one of those “old white men” served in the Korean Conflict to help her nation of origin from being overrun by Communism).Talk about privilege. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit an Event Listing August 7, 2018 at 6:14 pm Robbie,Bless your poor cotton socks. “War on Southern Heritage?” Do you mean southern traditions like racism, bigotry, hatred, anti-semitism, homophobia, xenophobia, and sexism? The church is doing good works here in reaching out to other communities and trying to build bridges. We should be celebrating this endeavour, not attacking it. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Robbie Johnson says: August 10, 2018 at 3:49 pm Mr. Sakal, thanks for your reply. From your response, it is obvious that you and I do not agree on much of anything. For example, you say “…You do not know our struggles nor can you speak for them”…”. I agree and the reverse is true! We are at stalemate now with those two sentences. Where I fundamentally disagree with you is saying “…that we all historically responsible for the sins of slavery and racism…”. I am NOT responsible for those evils nor are “white” people who treat others[ black, Asian, white, Hispanic, American Indian etc.] in a respectful and decent manner. And for you Mr. Taber, I have said and will say again, that sadly, bigotry exists and will exist so long as there are humans. Mr. Sakal, as long as folks with your viewpoint continue to “blame” me and other Caucasians for the sins of others, we as a country will NEVER overcome this slavery horror. Our dialogue has to be respectful from the outset and not “blameful”. August 8, 2018 at 7:21 am Matt – oh, I see. It is perfectly ok for you to dismiss others opinions based on real and perceived beliefs because, well, you feel that your opinions are dismissed.. the ol’ “They do it too!”, “Two wrongs make a right!” “It’s ok when I do it, wrong when they do it”. It is very rich that you quote Matthew 7:5; maybe you should read it a bit more closely and ponder the meaning as it applies to you. I am done with this, but know you will reply because from previous history, you have to have the last word. Maybe you should “check your privilege”… August 8, 2018 at 8:37 am Doug, what statistics do you have that racism is not experienced by most black people in this country? Providing anecdotal evidence of your three neighbors, while interesting, is not strong evidence. There is plenty of polling and statistical evidence that racism is still a major problem in this country, and that the majority of African-Americans believe it is a problem. Here are some examples:https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/03/19/upshot/race-class-white-and-black-men.htmlhttps://www.vox.com/cards/police-brutality-shootings-us/us-police-racismhttps://www.nbcnews.com/politics/politics-news/poll-64-percent-americans-say-racism-remains-major-problem-n877536https://www.cnn.com/2017/08/16/politics/blacks-white-racism-united-states-polls/index.htmlI’d also like to see evidence that fake claims of racism are widespread and systemic in society; actual polling and studies by non-biased sources, not merely anecdotal evidence. I am fairly confident that instances of racial discrimination outweigh fake claims of racism by minorities. And where did you see the media admit to giving a pass to President Obama? It seems to me they treated him normally like every other president. There were days they were hard on him (usually when he messed up) and there were days they were easy on him (usually when he did things right). Unless you were expecting the media to follow the Fox News model and just criticize him no matter what he did, the media was perfectly fair in my opinion. James McKim says: August 7, 2018 at 6:12 pm It’s not just the past, though. It’s the present as well. There is still a lot of racism and white privilege in our society, and we as a church should do our part to combat this systematic sin in our society. August 8, 2018 at 9:26 am Robbie,Once again, you overshot my point and completely missed, so let’s try again shall we. My point was that the only flag that matters for the Confederacy is the white flag of surrender. The war is long over, the dead are resting at peace, the cause is ended. There may be modern day neo-confederates, neo-nazis, and white supremacists who fly this “flag” of a nation-state that has been wiped from history, but they do that out of a hypocritical patriotism which they do not even understand and that shames the United States. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books August 7, 2018 at 6:48 pm Matt, you have not the experience or viable true statistics to be able to make the claim that racism – true racism – is a sustained experience of a majority of African Americans. I have three African American families around my street who will tell you that you don’t know what you’re talking about. They call out their own community for exaggerating being offended. Like them I would question what is being experienced and whether it is racism or something else. When some people are questioned it is called racism. When criminals who in fact DO the crime are caught and are punished it has been called racism. The collective media recently admitted that they gave Mr. Obama lots of room and softball questions with limited scrutiny because of fear of being labeled a racist. (Now they tell us.). The race card is pulled too often. Yes, racism and hate exists and should be examined and resisted, but a grievance and entitlement orientation also muddies the water and – as the labyrinth at the opening of this article suggests – we must get to all of the truth. Joe Prasad says: David A Salmon says: August 7, 2018 at 8:25 pm Robbie,People do not “hate” the south. However, we have come to recognise that those symbols of traitors, of enemies of the United States who took up arms against her deserve no recognition or praise/honours. They deserve to be remembered in the history books or in museums but NOT in any places of honour or special recognition. The only flag for the Confederacy that matters is the white flag of surrender. Ann Raynolds says: Rector Tampa, FL August 7, 2018 at 8:22 pm I’d say conservatives like Terry and yourself often dismiss the opinions of liberals and progressives without listening, so perhaps you should heed the advice of Matthew 7:5. I’m sorry, but there is abundant evidence of white privilege and racism in society, and it’s ridiculous to dismiss it as an excuse for people to not pull themselves up by their own bootstraps. There are real obstacles in society for people of color to get ahead in society. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Jordan Sakal says: August 13, 2018 at 8:25 pm When I was a young Marine there were a lot of racial tensions in the Marine Corps. So they developed a program called “Human Relations” to get us all talking about our differences. Racial problems only got worse. Eventually they discarded that approach and started talking about what made us all Marines. You will never unify people by focusing on the differences. The Episcopal Church’s efforts towards “racial reconciliation” are bound to aggravate the problem rather than solve it. John Hobart says: Robbie Johnson says: Featured Events August 10, 2018 at 1:12 am Mr. Waters, By your very assertion that “White privilege is crap,” you are exhibiting that very self same white privilege you denigrate as not being real. You do not have the ability to speak for all peoples in marginalised communities. You do not know our struggles nor can you speak for them. (Speaking as a member of one of those marginalised communities as a gay man.) While you are correct that it is not you personally who is responsible for the sins of slavery or of economic injustice, or so many other social ills. We all share the responsibility as members of a people who through their own erroneous deeds and actions throughout history have caused these injustices to exist. We are all historically responsible for the sins of colonialism, exploitation, and greed, we are all responsible for the sins of slavery and racism. It is all of our duties to make amends for these evils and ensure that they never happen again. Doug Desper says: August 9, 2018 at 10:41 pm To see this much vitriol aimed at white folks[really Caucasians] because they are “white” is the epitome of bigotry and hate! White people did not murder those nine poor people in South Carolina, an evil, possibly insane person did. Should I blame B. Sanders for the attempted murder of Steve Scalise and his colleagues because the shooter was a Sanders’ supporter? Many of you folks on this platform are trying with all your might to blame white people for the world’s ills. Ethnicity has NOTHING to do with evil acts. Blame the people who committed the crimes and stop this hate filled rhetoric about white people. I think the Episcopal Church is no longer a religious organization but an episcopal center for bigotry and hate. I would suggest that all “white” people leave the ecfb&h! Then all these white haters using this forum can have it to themselves. August 11, 2018 at 2:50 pm Mr. Sakal, my recent reply was not allowed; too much radicalism for the EC. I did read your reply and note that while you say that L. Waters is not personally responsible for past evils, you then say that all Caucasians are responsible for past evils and that includes me as a Caucasian. As far as healing social ills and evils, I try to treat each person with dignity and respect; that’s the way I was reared and that is the Christian way too. On another topic for a moment, how should modern day German people be treated for the evils/horrors of the WW2 concentration camps? My wife does not blame the German people for the atrocities committed by Germans against Jewish ancestors only the less than human/evil people who did these heinous acts. Back to your post, I never said anything about sweeping the racism issue under the rug , as you put it. I suggested that any discussion about racism/bigotry be respectful and not “blameful”. I have already stated that slavery was a most dreadful and horrible thing and should have never occurred. I cannot conceive how one so called human could enslave another human. Finally, Mr. Sakal, what would you like me and other Caucasians, who had nothing to do with slavery, do about healing wounds? Editor’s note: This story has been updated to include information about the latest round of United Thank Offering grants, which are focused on racial reconciliation this year.[Episcopal News Service] One of the biggest developments at the 79th General Convention related to the Episcopal Church’s work on racial reconciliation was the approval of a new grant program to support grassroots efforts, building on the progress made under the church’s new Becoming Beloved Community framework.The grant program outlined in Resolution D002 marks the first time a churchwide grant program will be dedicated specifically to providing financial support for Episcopalians working toward racial healing and justice in their congregations and communities. The 2019-2021 church budget includes $750,000 for the grants, much less than the $5 million recommended by D002, but these initiatives – such as forums, workshops and informal gatherings – often don’t need a lot of money to become viable and thrive.“It is exciting to think about how $750,000 over three years could really seed some powerful work,” said Heidi Kim, the church’s staff officer for racial reconciliation, and she is hopeful that the grant process will shine a brighter light on existing efforts already making a difference. “I think people all over the church are doing amazing things that we just don’t know about.”The money will be in addition to the more than $1.2 million in United Thank Offering grants announced in July for 34 projects. This year’s round of UTO grants were focused on racial healing, reconciliation and justice.The church also is taking steps to bring people together to share their insights. Another resolution, A228, calls for the creation of a Becoming Beloved Community summit by the end of 2019 to support and inspire the leaders of such initiatives.The resolution references the church’s aspiration to create “a network of healers, justice makers, and reconcilers” who would benefit from the pool of knowledge and shared experiences. Church leaders and staff members point to the model of the Episcopal Church’s church planting network, through which the creators of new ministries receive grant money and learn from fellow church planters.“That’s when grants make a huge difference in the church, and that’s what we now have the opportunity to build around Beloved Community,” said the Rev. Stephanie Spellers, the presiding bishop’s canon for evangelism, reconciliation and creation care.General Convention in 2015 identified racial reconciliation as one of the church’s three top priorities, along with evangelism and creation care, acknowledging the church’s decades-old efforts to confront its historic complicity in the sin of racism during the eras of slavery and segregation.The labyrinth diagram showing the four parts of the Episcopal Church’s Becoming Beloved Community is colored for an Advent mailing.Becoming Beloved Community is a framework that launched just last year. It is broken into four parts that are illustrated as a labyrinth: telling the truth about our churches and race, proclaiming the dream of Beloved Community, practicing the way of love in the pattern of Jesus and repairing the breach in society.Because Becoming Beloved Community launched in the middle of the triennium, about $1 million was left from the money budgeted for implementation in 2016-2018. When the 79th General Convention met last month in Austin, Texas, it approved a new budget that applies that unused amount to continued implementation in the new triennium.A total of $10.4 million was OK’d for racial justice and reconciliation work over the next three years. That amount includes a range of expenses, from anti-poverty initiatives to ethnic ministries, as well as Becoming Beloved Community and the new grant program. The grant program was assigned to Executive Council for development and implementation. Executive Council meets next in October.The local focus of the grants will be critical, said the Rev. Edwin Johnson, a deputy from Massachusetts and chair of General Convention’s Racial Justice and Reconciliation Committee.“We’re excited because there is considerable funding available for communities to do this work in their own context,” said Johnson, who is rector of St. Mary’s Episcopal Church in Dorchester, Massachusetts. “There was overwhelming support in both houses [of General Convention] for this work and, in particular, for work that is decentralized.”Johnson points to the experience of his own congregation, which is largely Afro-Caribbean. He received a Mission Enterprise Zone grant to start a Spanish-language ministry there, and it has thrived with support from the network of Episcopal church planters.Johnson is active in the development of a similar network of racial reconciliation leaders. About 50 people testified before Johnson’s committee at General Convention about the various resolutions assigned to the committee, and afterward, he reached out to each of them to enlist them in a new community of action around racial healing.“I think we did a really good job of bringing forth and calling forth new leadership in this area,” he said. Their energy is “precisely what we’re going to need for the long haul.”Catherine Meeks, one of the pre-eminent leaders in the church’s longtime push for racial justice, echoed Johnson in emphasizing the role of congregations.“This work has to be done at the parish level ultimately. … Becoming Beloved Community is trying to make that happen,” she said. “The more informed, the more conscious people are, hopefully, the more they engage with the work.”Meeks’ work in developing and conducting anti-racism training for the Diocese of Atlanta has served as a model churchwide for such training, which was mandated for ordained and lay leaders by a 2000 resolution passed by General Convention. Implementation has been uneven.“It’s a mandate that nobody really enforces,” she said, and dioceses’ track record of implementing plans for the training continues to be a topic regularly taken up by General Convention.Last month, General Convention passed Resolution A044 attempting to clarify the criteria for such training, suggesting a structure that coincides with the four parts of Becoming Beloved Community. Another resolution, A045, acknowledges “not all dioceses have followed the spirit of the anti-racism training required,” and it calls for better documentation of participation in the training.The training is vital, Meeks said, because it provides a safe setting for Episcopalians to confront tough questions about their church and themselves while helping them open their minds and consider ways they engage in racial healing and justice.Meeks now serves as executive director of the Absalom Jones Center for Racial Healing, a ministry of the Diocese of Atlanta that offers a churchwide resource for fostering open dialogue about race and racism.At the same time, Meeks led a push this year to move away from the term “anti-racism” in favor of a greater focus on healing, justice and reconciliation. She helped Atlanta Bishop Robert Wright and others draft Resolution B004, which sought that shift in language.“To talk about our work under the rubric of healing and justice and reconciliation just has a more positive energy around it and states what we’re trying to do in the world,” Meeks said.Questions about the language of reconciliation and clarifying the mandate of the Executive Council Committee on Anti-Racism generated spirited debate during General Convention, and it ultimately ended in something of a compromise. “Anti-racism” remains in the committee’s name, but “reconciliation” was added, making it the Executive Council Committee on Anti-Racism & Reconciliation. And the approved version of B004 adjusts the church’s focus to “dismantling racism” while adding the emphasis on “racial healing, justice and reconciliation.”“What pleased me the most was the conversation we had around the issue, because I think that conversation was very healthy and very needed,” Meeks said.Many people feel strongly about these issues, whether affirming the need to maintain a focus on dismantling racism or pushing for a more theological approach to racial healing, said Kim, the staff officer for reconciliation. The value of the Becoming Beloved Community framework, she said, is that it seeks to engage all Episcopalians in that conversation, wherever they may be on their spiritual journey.“We all have room to grow in terms of how we can be reconcilers and healers,” she said.– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Terry Francis says: August 7, 2018 at 2:58 pm Doug, speaking as a black conservative I could not agree more. I think Booker T. would be disgusted at the rhetoric of our so-called black leaders and progressives in general in this country. This whole “white privilege” concept is being used as a crutch for many who want things handed to them rather than actually working to improve their lot. It gets really old after a while. Will the black community still be whining about wp 2 or 3 generations from now? Probably. August 8, 2018 at 8:33 am Mr. Salmon, In fact, Mr. Ouellette has done nothing but been kind and courteous in these discussions from what I have seen since joining them myself. You were wrong to attack his comments because as he said his point could have been made clearer and he clarified his intentions and made a valid argument. He took the time to answer your “outrage” and acquitted himself well.Maybe you should try climbing off that high horse of yours? Although I don’t think they make ladders tall enough. Matt Ouellette says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Larry Waters says: August 14, 2018 at 10:53 am It is just a matter of time until this demographic is swept out of the church! Rector Bath, NC August 7, 2018 at 7:26 pm Matt – so what you are saying is that you do not trust and will dismiss the opinions and beliefs of a person of color because those opinions do not match your own. Terry’s opinions are not trusted by you because they are opinions you consider a minority in the AfricanAmerican community? I thought this process of reconciliation was to first listen to each other and value all opinions but I guess the only ones that matter are those that match the opinions of white liberals. I cannot believe you made that statement and you cannot see your own bigotry and privilege. But I am confident you will come back and explain how your beliefs are righteous and conservative beliefs should be dismissed David A Salmon says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET August 8, 2018 at 3:18 am Regardlesswhat you haters of the south say, there are those who proudly display the flags of the CSA. Les Ferguson says: Matt Ouellette says: August 7, 2018 at 8:37 pm I did not dismiss his opinion, but rather voiced my disagreement (although perhaps I could have worded my disagreement better). I said that I agreed with the majority of African-Americans who don’t think white privilege is a concept used by people who “want things handed to them rather than actually working to improve their lot.” I didn’t know that I wasn’t allowed to disagree with someone just because they are conservative. I would also say conservatives such as Terry and yourself are often dismissive of the opinions of liberal and progressives, so you perhaps should keep that in mind when judging people of being privileged for dismissing conservative opinions (and remember Matthew 7:5). Larry Waters says: August 6, 2018 at 11:35 am I would hope that all involved wit this program would read “White Guilt” by Shelby Steele in order to better understand what is needed to make this program a success. August 7, 2018 at 6:19 pm We do recognize the progress made. But we also don’t deny that there is still progress that is needed, unlike many conservatives who deny the problem of racism in general. August 7, 2018 at 7:44 pm The war on southern heritage is the continued effort by haters of the south to remove all Confederate statues, Confederate names on buildings and streets/highways, and stained glass windows. Included in his vile attitude is the removal of the Confederate battle flag along with the three official flags of The Confederate States Of America, some of the flags on private property no less! Comments are closed. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Press Release Service General Convention 2018, Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI August 6, 2018 at 6:47 pm Another book which should be considered is entitled: “In honor of Frank T. Griswold: I Have Called You Friends.” That provides insights into fair reconciliation without placing blame. Grant program to be developed to support congregations’ grassroots work on racial healing Doug Desper says: August 6, 2018 at 6:42 pm There are liberals whom would love to see southern white males that are descendants of Confederates euthanized Matt Ouellette says: Matt Ouellette says: August 6, 2018 at 7:53 pm Bruce and Lou. I didn’t deny that white privilege exists. I remarked that whites are not the only privileged persons when you stop the abstract statements and watch actual people. Circumstances and choices affect the level of advantage. The Civil War is over. The Great Society of President Johnson, and 50 years of national advancements have opened doors for people of all backgrounds. Booker T. Washington proved over 100 years ago that people can succeed and advance themselves but that it won’t be handed and it requires change. You want a total elimination of racism, privilege, and unfairness. So do I. Give credit, however to the successes and the opportunities. Have awareness, too, that there are significant numbers of people who want advantage without personal change. Who want their choices at the expense of others. Who scapegoat whites as though they are helpless. August 9, 2018 at 11:43 pm Mr. Ouellette, please DO NOT come at me with this “white privilege” crap. Using that term , among others, is just another way to further spur discontent and divisiveness. Of course you don’t feel hated in the ec because you are one of the folks who promotes white guilt, even though in your own words, you are white. What I did not say in my earlier post is that if you are Caucasian and do not leave the ec, then in my view, you are a person who wants to see the U.S.A. follow the path of the Roman Empire to self-destruction. I do not believe that there is systemic racism in this country; and while we are “chatting”, racism [bigotry] is NOT peculiar to white folks; bigotry is, sadly, human and will be around so long as humans are here. If you ever wanted me to join you and other folks who share your views in a discussion, then I would be pleased to do so, BUT if anyone ever started this “white guilt” garbage, I would immediately leave the discussion. I am NOT responsible for anyone’s actions but my own and the bigotry against black people and American Indians are the actions of evil people; ethnicity had nothing to do with their evil. They perpetrated their bigotry because that is who they were. August 8, 2018 at 3:59 pm Many years ago, I read Dinesh D’Souza’s book – The End of Racism. I may not agree with everything that he wrote but it was the first time I became aware of the complexity of slavery. It is good to have laws and policies to help those in real need but continued welfare based on past / perceived grievances should be discouraged.Sometimes a simple gesture of apology can go a long way towards reconciliation and healing. Leaders of African nations from where people were kidnapped and sold into slavery ought to participate in this also. Jordan Sakal says: Bruce Garner says: August 10, 2018 at 7:23 pm Mr. Sakal, I did read your posting and in my response I said that not only was I not responsible for the evils perpetrated but other white folks who treated non-white people decently etc. were not responsible. It is your “we” that I object to, even though you said that L. Waters was not responsible for the evils, you then blamed “we whites” which includes me! So far as healing, I try to treat other people in a respectful and dignified manner. And the discussion to which you refer, I have never pretended that slavery did not happen. It was a horrible and unspeakable evil done to many people. Moving out of the slavery discussion for a moment, what do think that the current German people should do about the concentration camps of WW2? My wife does not blame the current German populous for atrocities perpetrated on her Jewish ancestors. She is tearful but does not place blame except on the evil, monstrous people who did these inhuman acts. So back to the main discussion, what is it that you believe that I should do to atone for evil that other people committed? Larry Waters says: Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Bruce Garner says: Jordan Sakal says: August 6, 2018 at 4:41 pm Robbie, as one who was born, raised and lived his entire life in Georgia, there are parts of my so-called Southern Heritage that do need to be the victim of “war” as you call it. I can’t change history, but I can look at it honestly and use it as a teaching tool to help future generations learn from our horrible mistakes in how we white folks treated anyone who was not white. I have known too many who made an idol out of portions of history that should never even be highlighted much less viewed favorably. We need to be ashamed of much of what we did and even in whose name we claimed to have done it. I am indeed a child of the south with all the baggage and the joys that come with that. We have work to do. Period. August 6, 2018 at 6:48 pm Do you really believe that? If so, I’m sorry. Matt Ouellette says: Larry Waters says: Robbie Johnson says: August 6, 2018 at 5:03 pm I look forward to the time when all training will adhere to the framework put forth by GC 2018-A044 and racial reconciliation certification process is tied to the framework and consistenly applied across the church for only then will the difficult conversations take place resulting in beloved community. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Robbie Johnson says: David A Salmon says: August 8, 2018 at 12:33 pm As soon as you liberals get rid of southern white hetro males age 60 and over things will get better! August 6, 2018 at 5:07 pm Doug…seriously???I am an “old white man” and I do take ownership of my white privilege and my part in creating the problems related to racism in this nation. White folks were the perpetrators of racial inequality in this nation from the beginning when we bought human beings who had been enslaved and brought over from Africa. I come from a very poor background and doubt that anyone among my family could have afforded to buy another human being. They were more likely to be indentured to someone themselves. I was born and raised in Georgia and that colony was originally founded by indentured servants.Perpetrating racial bias and prejudice by whites didn’t end when slavery allegedly ended. We are still dealing with Jim Crow laws in certain parts of the country. I can introduce you to people who will still show no qualms about using certain terms for African-Americans. I can take you places where anyone of color would not be welcomed. These are sad examples of what white privilege can create.The victims of bias and discrimination cannot resolve the problem. The resolution, the healing and the reconciliation has to begin with the admission on our part that we created the situation that still fosters racism and white privilege. Until we do that, progress toward healing and reconciliation will continue to be painfully slow. Yes, the color of your skin has brought you privilege you did not earn. August 8, 2018 at 3:13 am The last active Confederate flag to be retired was the flag aboard The CSS Shenandoah at the port of Liverpool England in November 1865. It WAS NOT the white flag of surrender! Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT August 14, 2018 at 12:07 pm Robbie,Where do you get this belief from? TEC is not sweeping anyone from the church. Jordan Sakal says: Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Les Ferguson says: Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Belleville, IL Jordan Sakal says: Submit a Press Release August 6, 2018 at 3:00 pm Robbie Johnson, this story is not about the South, nor is the grant program. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Shreveport, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem August 9, 2018 at 11:07 pm Well, I’m white and I certainly don’t feel hated in TEC or when discussing race relations. Nor have we blamed all whites for evil acts against black people. What we are doing is pointing out white privilege and forms of systemic racism that disenfranchises people of color, which are still serious problems in this country as I demonstrated with links in a previous comment. Pointing this out is not “hating white people.” That is not a serious criticism. Submit a Job Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC August 11, 2018 at 6:57 pm Mr. Waters,You are correct in that I said that you personally met absolve yourself of responsibility for the crimes of the past. However like I said as a collective we caucasians do bear a responsibility for the granting of reparations or healing of those social ills. We should do our part to make amends for the past and make sure it never happens again.Regarding your information about Germany and World War II I believe that the German people have done the correct thing in repudiating the actions of the Nazis and disowning this portion of their history. This is in direct contrast to the neo-confederates and others who in this country cling to the statues of Robert E Lee and other Confederates. As a nation we should acknowledge this part of our history in the place of museums but not directly in places of honour not on street corners or in town squares. What I would suggest doing in regarding the making of reparations or amends would be to reach out to communities that you would not normally reach out to and learn what life is like on the other side. As an example, African Americans speak frequently of being deathly afraid of being killed every time they exit their homes by police officers perhaps having a discussion and learning about this perspective will help you heal wounds August 14, 2018 at 10:50 am The Episcopal Church favors all groups EXCEPT white conservative hetrosexual southern males. August 7, 2018 at 6:35 pm I’m glad to see this program happening. Racism is one of our country’s original sins, and we still have a lot of work to do to rid the nation of it. Curate Diocese of Nebraska August 7, 2018 at 6:17 pm I would say that I trust the majority of African-Americans who point out the racism and white privilege in our society over the minority of black conservatives who deny the problem. Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA August 7, 2018 at 7:41 pm Matt – Ih, and for the record, I believe there is racism in our society that we need to continue to work against but am appalled you dismiss Terry’s opinion because he is conservative. That is a prime example of privilege… Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK David Paulsen says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 August 6, 2018 at 1:42 pm Just another fancy way of saying The War On Southern Heritage!7 Doug Desper says: August 11, 2018 at 12:55 am I have had opportunity to work with people from different countries including Britain. I have heard British colleagues speak nonchalantly about the atrocities their ancestors committed against people of various countries including their own. They proceed to tell that why should they be held responsible for crimes that their grandfathers, great-grandfathers, etc committed. There is some truth to this. It may take multiple generations before wounds especially psychological ones are finally healed. The way forward would be to have proper laws to prevent similar acts happening again keeping history in mind.When the MeToo movement gained momentum, a lady friend commented that insulting acts against women have been going on for years but it is only now that laws are properly being implemented. Wonder who decided to allow the laws to be finally implemented!The British committed many atrocities in India; racism and casteism co-existed during their rule and this was a double curse esp for the middle and the lower castes. Once the British rule ended, people realized that they had to move on with their life and stop blaming the British for all their troubles. Robbie Johnson says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Lou Schoen says: Robbie Johnson says: August 6, 2018 at 6:30 pm Thank you, Bruce! Virginia plantation owners and colonial leaders founded the racist system in America and imbedded color-based definitions of race in the law. While the South was the most visible part of the emerging country in maintaining the race-based slave system and its aftermaths, Northern states gained massive economic benefits from it and mostly supported it until Southern political leaders decided they wanted full control. After slavery, the Jim Crow system prevailed in the North, as well, albeit with fewer written laws. We still struggle with the destructive results of housing segregation, which was legally as well as economically required.The challenge of overcoming and transforming the historical impact of racism, including the social privileges distributed by our culture predominantly to people defined as “white,” is probably the number one test of our capacity to move toward anything resembling a Beloved Community – but, please, Everyone, let’s try!! Featured Jobs & Calls Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Matt Ouellette says: Tags August 6, 2018 at 5:50 pm Sorry, but I’m getting tired of reading all this racial reconciliation stuff. We can feel guilty about the state of things (or not) now, but I can’t personally help, defend, or condemn what went on in the past. In my 60 years of being an Episcopalian in the south, I’m sure there were probably some staunch racists in our fold, but they must have kept it hidden quite well, because I can’t name one from my past. I don’t have numbers or any sort of documentation, but I’m thinking that the vast majority of our parishes (small, large, rural, urban, whatever) are usually predominantly white, African American, Latino, or something else. How can we address racial issues in our Church, when generally we don’t worship together. I know there are exceptions somewhere, and there many times may be a small (very small) group of worshipers within a congregation who are of some other race or culture than that which is the majority. So, money, workshops, committees, etc. can have at it. But, if racially we are still going to be sitting in different buildings on Sunday morning, I don’t know what we gain, except that some of the activist types will probably feel better. Just my thoughts. August 7, 2018 at 10:28 am Ann, one of my favorite books is “Up From Slavery” written by someone who actually lived as a slave and then as a free person who taught others how to move forward in life. Isn’t that person the one to move to the front of the line and gain our attention? Booker T. Washington actually experienced and taught about what others write about from a distance. He proved his points and had a lot to say about race relations and how to achieve advancement. Victimhood was not in his vocabulary. One famous quote: “There is a certain class of race problem-solvers who don’t want the patient to get well, because as long as the disease holds out they have not only an easy means of making a living, but also an easy medium through which to make themselves prominent before the public.”That was written over 100 years ago. America has advanced far since then and this reality is rarely recognized by progressive liberals some of whom make their living keeping the disease alive. No one writing today can claim the same credibility as someone who actually lived through the greatest injustice in American history. The bottom line for Washington is simple: don’t expect to obtain dignity from anyone – it comes from your character and what you achieve. You are not a victim except of your own limited thinking and dependence on others and what they think of you. Advancement means personal sacrifice and will not be granted easily to you. Embracing those ideals helps the “patient get well”. August 7, 2018 at 8:52 am There are many books. My favorite is by Jim Wallis : AMERICA’S ORIGINAL SIN. Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Jordan Sakal says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Knoxville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME By David PaulsenPosted Aug 6, 2018 last_img read more

Jerusalem archbishop picks priests from US, UK for leadership positions

first_img Featured Events Rector Washington, DC Tags Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Anglican Communion, New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Middle East, Rector Collierville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK [Anglican Communion News Service] Archbishop Suheil Dawani of the Anglican Diocese in Jerusalem has appointed an American priest as his chaplain and a British priest as dean of St. George’s College. The diocese attracts thousands of visitors each year as it is home to the birthplace of Christianity. It serves Jordan, Palestine, Israel, Syria and Lebanon. The Rev. Donald Binder, currently rector of Pohick Episcopal Church near Mount Vernon in Virginia, will become Suheil’s new chaplain. The Rev. Richard Sewell, currently rector of the Barnes Team Ministry in South West London, will become dean of St. George’s College. Both will begin their appointments in October.Read the full article here. Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Press Release AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Albany, NY Rector Bath, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Press Release Service Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR People Israel-Palestine, Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Job Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS center_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Knoxville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Posted Sep 21, 2018 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Jobs & Calls Jerusalem archbishop picks priests from US, UK for leadership positions Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit an Event Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJlast_img read more

Minnesota Episcopalians’ love for Bishop Whipple is lost on federal…

first_img Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Knoxville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET A prayer vigil is held outside the Bishop Henry Whipple Federal Building in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The Interfaith Coalition on Immigration organizes the monthly vigils to show solidarity with immigrant detainees and their families who come to the building for immigration hearings. Photo: Interfaith Coalition on Immigration, via Facebook[Episcopal News Service] Bishop Henry Whipple is kind of a big deal in Minnesota.Consecrated as the Diocese of Minnesota’s first bishop in 1859, Whipple spent more than four decades establishing The Episcopal Church’s roots in the newly founded state while leading missionary work among the American Indian tribes of Minnesota, and in 1862, he successfully lobbied President Abraham Lincoln to spare most of the 303 Dakota warriors who had been sentenced to death for an uprising that year.Bishop Henry Whipple led The Episcopal Church in Minnesota from 1859 until his death in 1901. Photo: Minnesota Historical SocietyToday, his name graces the Bishop Henry Whipple Federal Building just east of the airport in Minneapolis – a rare honor for an Episcopal bishop, but one that local Episcopal leaders now say runs counter to Whipple’s legacy. They want his name removed.“All of us drive by this building all the time, but very few people actually know what’s going on in there,” said the Rev. Devon Anderson, one of the Episcopal priests organizing a campaign to rename the building.What’s going on in the Whipple building, they say, is a microcosm of the Trump administration’s crackdown on immigration violations, which The Episcopal Church has criticized for upending lives, separating families and disrupting communities. Minnesota’s Twin Cities are known as a hub for federal immigration enforcement across five states – Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, North Dakota and South Dakota – and at the center of that hub is the Whipple building, which houses an immigration court. U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE, is a constant presence.“Any immigrant who is arrested in that region, for the most part, has court in that building,” said the Rev. Daniel Romero, a United Church of Christ minister and volunteer with the Minneapolis-based Interfaith Coalition on Immigration. “The Whipple building is both their first stop and their last stop on their deportation journey.”The Interfaith Coalition on Immigration holds monthly prayer vigils outside the building to show solidarity with immigrant detainees and their families. On Oct. 29, the coalition will be joined by The Episcopal Church in Minnesota and the Minnesota Council of Churches in an expanded vigil and rally to kick off the “What Would Whipple Do?” campaign, calling for the removal of Whipple’s name or the eviction of ICE from the building.Compassionless enforcement is “not our theology. That’s not who we are as a church,” Anderson said in an interview with Episcopal News Service. She serves as rector of Trinity Episcopal Church in Excelsior, Minnesota.The Rev. Robert Two Bulls Jr. is another Episcopal priest on the team organizing the campaign. In additional to serving as missioner for the diocese’s Department of Indian Work and Multicultural Ministries, Two Bulls is vicar at All Saints Episcopal Indian Mission in Minneapolis. About a year ago, his congregation rallied to support a parishioner whose partner was picked up by ICE and eventually deported to Mexico.Two Bulls told ENS it always seemed odd that a federal building would be named after an Episcopal bishop, and with ICE conducting enforcement from the building, the association with Whipple troubles him.“Given who he was, I think he would be very much against something like that,” Two Bulls said.Whipple’s reputation isn’t immaculate. His approach to the Dakota and Ojibwe in Minnesota was that of a colonizer, seeking to assimilate Native people into white culture while spreading Christianity, Romero told ENS. But Whipple also was “a man who was trying to do the right thing by the people he encountered.”Two Bulls, who is Lakota, called Whipple “a man of his time and, in some respects, ahead of his time.” And the Rev. Letha Wilson-Barnard, rector at Holy Apostles Episcopal Church in St. Paul, noted how Whipple in 1863 ministered to the hundreds of Dakota who were held in an internment camp at Fort Snelling before the federal government forcibly relocated them to South Dakota.Minnesota Bishop Henry Whipple preaches at a Dakota internment camp at Fort Snelling in 1863. Photo: Minnesota Historical SocietyMore than a hundred years later, part of Fort Snelling would become the site for the Whipple Federal Building, built in 1969.“It’s tied to this really shameful event in Minnesota history, where he was on the side of advocacy and treating people humanely,” Wilson-Barnard said.Before joining the campaign to rename the building, Wilson-Barnard had been attending the prayer vigils at the Whipple building for about a year. Immigrants, especially Hmong, make up a large part of her congregation, and she has accompanied some of them to immigration court in the Whipple building.“Whenever I’ve gone to that Whipple building, it just slays me that his name is on that building,” she said.Whipple, who died in 1901, was not mentioned by name in the program for the June 9, 1969, dedication of the building, but Congress soon gave the building its present name based on a proposal by then-Sen. Walter Mondale, Romero said.Today, while the building houses offices of a number of federal agencies, including Veterans Affairs, it has become “the center of oppression” for immigrants in the region because of ICE’s activities, Romero said. He thanked The Episcopal Church in Minnesota for supporting efforts to raise awareness.The Episcopal Church has been outspoken on immigration issues in recent years, and in July 2018, during General Convention in Austin, Texas, more than a thousand Episcopalians gathered at a prayer service outside an immigrant detention center in rural Texas. General Convention later passed three resolutions related to immigration. One of the resolutions took a forceful stand against family separation and inhumane treatment of immigrant parents and children. Another resolution emphasized respecting the dignity of immigrants, while the third encouraged Episcopalians to seek ways to offer sanctuary or support to immigrants.One of the ultimate goals of the Interfaith Coalition on Immigration in Minnesota is to win passage of legislation making Minnesota a sanctuary state, meaning state agencies would be barred from devoting resources to federal immigration enforcement activities. That effort could be bolstered by attention generated by the “What Would Whipple Do?” campaign.The campaign’s Episcopal team expects to hold a strategy session when The Episcopal Church in Minnesota holds its diocesan convention, Sept. 13-14. The ongoing planning also coincides with a separately scheduled meeting of the House of Bishops next week in Minneapolis, though it wasn’t immediately clear whether the gathering of bishops would take up the issue while they are in town.It’s also not entirely clear what it would take to rename the Whipple Federal Building.“In each Congress, many bills are introduced to name a post office or other federal building in honor or in memory of locally esteemed individuals, deceased elected officials, fallen military personnel, and celebrities,” the Congressional Research Service says in a report on commemorations. “To name a post office or other federal building after an individual an act of Congress is required.”Presumably, Congress would need to act on renaming a building as well, though Romero said it’s possible the head of the U.S. General Services Administration can take that action without seeking approval from Congress.In the meantime, Whipple will be honored in another way this weekend at Minnesota’s diocesan convention. Each year, one Episcopalian is presented with the Whipple Cross, the diocese’s highest award.“For his time, he is seen as a real advocate” for indigenous people, Anderson said, “and someone that the church feels proud of.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Tags Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Press Release Service Featured Events Director of Music Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS By David PaulsenPosted Sep 13, 2019 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Albany, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Martinsville, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Faith & Politics, The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC center_img Featured Jobs & Calls In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Immigration, Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Pittsburgh, PA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit an Event Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Indigenous Ministries Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Belleville, IL Rector Bath, NC Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Collierville, TN Minnesota Episcopalians’ love for Bishop Whipple is lost on federal building that bears his name Rector Tampa, FL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Job Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis last_img read more